R.J. Kern on Establishing a Fine Art Career

Posted by on Tuesday January 2, 2018 | Business

R.J. Kern, who began his career in 2012 as a wedding photographer, will published his first monograph this spring featuring his exquisite pastoral portraits of sheep and goats. It is one of several personal projects he’s been working on for the past few years. As he worked on those projects, Kern was connecting with other emerging artists for peer critiques and to learn as much as he could about the art photography business. He made some connections as a user group leader for Pictage, the now-defunct online photo storage platform. He also met peers and mentors at industry conferences and portfolio reviews.

“One of my favorite things about portfolio reviews is expanding your peer group, and looking at each other’s work until 1:30 in the morning, critiquing and sequencing and editing, and sharing ideas,” Kern says. He got ideas and advice about everything from building a website and finding a publisher to landing a gallery, structuring limited editions and pricing his work. “These are things that are vital to artists’ careers that they don’t teach you in art school,” he says.

His own toughest challenge was figuring out how to write a good artist’s statement and talk about his work. His peers served as a sounding board, “and helped to fine-tune the message,” he says.

For more about how he transitioned from wedding photography to fine art, see “Career Change: R.J. Kern Moves from Weddings to Fine Art.”

Related:
On Showing Both Commercial & Fine Art Work: Emily Shur’s Advice
PhotoPlus Expo: Building a Career in Fine Art Photography
A Fine Art Approach to Photographing Animals
What I Didn’t Learn in Art School: Life Lessons from Photographers


COMMENTS

MORE POSTS

Quick Tip: How to Ask Donors to Support Your Photo Project

Posted by on Friday February 9, 2018 | Business

Few photographers are comfortable asking for donations to support their projects. Fundraising expert Dianne Debicella, program director at Community Partners in LA (and formerly senior program director at Fractured Atlas), reminds artists that they’re not begging. She explains why confidence is so important when asking potential donors for money: “You have to frame [the pitch]... More