Wildlife Photographer of the Year Award Goes to Brent Stirton for Rhino Poaching Photo

Posted by on Wednesday October 18, 2017 | Awards/Contests/Grants

HLUHLUWE UMFOLOZI GAME RESERVE, KWAZULU NATAL, SOUTH AFRICA, 17 MAY 2016: A Black Rhino Bull is seen dead, poached for its horns less than 24 hours earlier at Hluhluwe Umfolozi Game Reserve, South Africa. It is suspected that the killers came from a local community approximately 5 kilometers away, entering the park illegally, shooting the rhino at a water hole with a high-powered, silenced hunting rifle. An autopsy and postmortem carried out by members of the KZN Ezemvelo later revealed that the large calibre bullet went straight through this rhino, causing massive tissue damage. It was noted that he did not die immediately but ran a short distance, fell to his knees and a coup de grace shot was administered to the head from close range. Black Rhino are the most endangered rhino, HluHluwe Umfolozi is one of the last repositories for these animals, with less than 3000 left in the wild today. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images Reportage for National Geographic Magazine.)

South African photojournalist Brent Stirton’s grisly image of a de-horned black rhinoceros, killed by poachers in South Africa’s Hluhluwe Imfolozi Park, won him Wildlife Photographer of the Year honors in the annual competition sponsored by the Natural History Museum, London. Stirton was honored Wednesday evening in a ceremony at the Natural History Museum. His image was chosen from among nearly 50,000 entries from 92 countries.

Stirton made the image as part of his project “Rhino Wars,” an undercover investigation for National Geographic into the black market for rhino horn, which is fueled by demand in Asia. “The horn is part of an ancient Asian medical system and today is seen as a curative for everything from Cancer to Kidney stones,” Stirton writes in a statement published on his website. “Essentially keratin, a mild alkaline substance identical to fingernails, the horn is ground down in grinding bowls and mixed with water. This is then ingested by the sick and the wealthy of Vietnam and China, the imbiber hoping for miracle cures, when in fact science shows us it has a placebo effect at best. The use of horn dates back over 2000 years but the recent economic rise of countries like China and Vietnam and the subsequent wealth of the new upper class has had disastrous effects on the world’s remaining rhino population.”

Jury chair Lewis Blackwell said of Stirton’s image: “There is a horrible intimacy to the photograph: it draws us in and invites us to explore our response and responsibility.”

“This shocking picture of an animal butchered for its horns is a call to action for us all,” added Natural History Museum Director, Sir Michael Dixon, in a statement.

 

Daniël Nelson's image of a nine-year-old male gorilla eating breadfruit won him Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

Daniël Nelson’s image of a nine-year-old male gorilla eating breadfruit won him Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

Dutch photographer Daniël Nelson was named Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year for his image of a nine-year-old gorilla that lives in Odzala-Kokoua National Park, Republic of the Congo.

Now in its 27th year, the Wildlife Photographer of the Year award includes an exhibition featuring the images of the winners and finalists, as well as a catalogue of the work. The exhibition opens at the Natural History Museum, London on October 20, and will continue through May 28, 2018 before touring internationally.

Past Wildlife Photographer of the Year winners include Daniel Beltrá, Paul Nicklen, Michael “Nick” Nichols and Tim Laman.

Related:

HOW PHOTOGRAPHERS HELP SCIENTISTS SEE DIFFERENTLY

ADVICE FOR SHOOTING AND SUPPORTING WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECTS


COMMENTS

MORE POSTS

8 Photographers Win Magnum Foundation Fund Grant

Posted by on Wednesday May 30, 2018 | Awards/Contests/Grants

Sarker Protick, Magnum Foundation
Terrace and pigeon house built by a family occupying the Dubolhati Rajbari, Dubolhati, Bangladesh. © Sarker Protick

The Magnum Foundation Fund has announced the recipients of its 2018 grant. The winners will receive grants of varying amounts as well as “project development support” to explore “new models of storytelling.” The Magnum Foundation announced the news today. The eight winning projects are: “Eclipse” by Sagar Chhetri; “Orinoco Women’s Journal” by Juanita Escobar; “Santa Barbara”... More

Quick Tip: What Jurors Look for in Your Grant Application

Posted by on Thursday May 24, 2018 | Awards/Contests/Grants

Grant competition jurors reject hundreds of applications because photographers often treat them like contest entry forms, “with a project description, but little or nothing about how they’re going to execute it or distribute the work,” says Chelsea Matiash, senior editor at The New York Times and a juror for the 2017 Getty Editorial grants. “Jurors... More

Eight Photographers Win Reuters Photojournalism Grants of $5K

Posted by on Wednesday May 16, 2018 | Awards/Contests/Grants, Photojournalism

Eight photographers have won the first Reuters photojournalism grants of $5,000, the news service announced today. Reuters created the grant program to support “a diverse new generation of photojournalists” who can tell stories from new and different perspectives. Reuters launched the initiative last year at Visa pour l‘image international festival of photojournalism in Perpignan, France.... More