How Robert Shults Photographed His Own Homeless Experience

Posted by on Friday August 11, 2017 | Fine Art

From "The Small Corners of Existence" © Robert Shults

Formerly homeless photographer Robert Shults recently explained in a Q&A with PDN the ethical and esthetic challenges of photographing homeless people, and how photographers can approach the topic in ways that dignify the subjects and elicit empathy and deeper understanding on the part of viewers.

In his own photography, Shults has concentrated lately on scientific subjects. But his earlier work includes projects about his own experience with homelessness. In this video, he talks about his project called “The Small Corners of Existence,” and how he conveys what homelessness felt like for him, and for others living on the streets.

Related:
A Formerly Homeless Photographer on How to (And Not to) Photograph Homeless People
Creating a Photography Study of Decaying Corpses


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