Update: Photographer Khadija Saye Killed in London Grenfell Tower Fire

Posted by on Thursday June 15, 2017 | Fine Art

Khadija Saye at the opening of the Diversity Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2017.

Update: On Friday, June 16, the family of Khadija Saye confirmed the photographer was among those killed in the Grenfell Tower fire on June 14. 

Khadija Saye, a London photographer whose work is currently on view in the Venice Biennale, is among the people missing after a fire engulfed the Grenfell Tower apartment building in West London on June 14, the Telegraph reports.

Saye, 24, lived with her mother on the 20th floor of the apartment tower. She last posted on Facebook at 3AM on Wednesday, about two hours after the blaze broke out. She reported that she had tried to leave the building, but was stopped by smoke and flames. Since then, friends, family and former classmates have been contacting hospitals and posting public appeals for information on her whereabouts.

According to the latest police reports, 17 people died in the fire and 37 residents of the building remain in the hospital. The fire department have stopped their search of the burnt-out building until engineers can determine if it’s structurally safe.

A graduate of the University for the Creative Arts, Farnham, Saye uses photography to explore culture and identity, and has photographed communities in both England and Gambia, where her mother was born. The Diversity Pavilion, on view at the Venice Biennale, includes Saye’s tintype self-portraits in which she incorporates objects her mother uses in her spiritual practice. Artist Nicola Green, who mentored Saye, said in an appeal for information, “She is our dear friend, a beautiful soul and emerging artist.”


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