Instagram has been under fire of late for how celebrities are using the service to post sponsored content without adequately divulging the fact that it’s paid for–in contravention of FTC guidelines. In fact, a recent study found that 93 percent of the platform’s top 50 celebrities had violated the FTC’s Instagram disclosure rules.

Now the social media network is hoping to patch things up with what is essentially a new tag for sponsored posts. The tag will initially be available to Instagram users with business profiles and will prominently disclose the fact that they’re taking money.

Of course, those users can opt not to include the tag on their posts. As Wired notes, the service doesn’t yet have any reliable enforcement mechanism to police pay-for-play on the network. 

Beyond the new content tagging tool, Instagram is also rolling out an Archive feature that lets you make previously public images private.

You can archive a post by tapping on “…” at the top of the post and selecting the Archive option. You can also un-archive a post if you decide you actually do want the whole world to see it.

 


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