Photographer Mathias Depardon, who was arrested and detained by Turkish police on May 8, has begun a hunger strike to protest his detention, Reuters and other news outlets report.

Depardon, a French citizen based in Istanbul, was arrested while on assignment for National Geographic photographing in the town of Hasankeyf. An order for Depardon’s deportation was issued on May 11, but he remains in detention in a jail run by the National Department for Migration.

Reporters without Borders (RSF) reports that Depardon began his hunger strike on May 22.

RSF has called Depardon’s arrest “completely unjustified.” According to RSF, Hasankeyf police said they had arrested Depardon on suspicion of “propaganda for a terrorist organization.” His photos of members of the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), which is banned in Turkey, had been published in French media.

Erol Önderoğlu, RSF’s representative in Turkey said, “The absurd charges brought against him seem designed solely to justify his arbitrary arrest after the event. We call for nothing less than his complete release, without prosecution or expulsion.”

At the time of his arrest, Depardon was working in Hasankeyf on a story for National Geographic about how the historic town could be damaged if a proposed dam is built.

Committee to Protect Journalists calls Turkey the world’s leading jailer of journalists, with 159 journalists currently in jail.

Related Article:
Photojournalist Andy Spyra Deported from Turkey on Allegations He’s a Jihadist

Photojournalists Demand Encrypted Cameras


COMMENTS

MORE POSTS

Photographer Kamaran Najm’s Friends Break Silence on His 2014 Kidnapping

Posted by on Tuesday November 14, 2017 | Photojournalism

Three years after photojournalist Kamaran Najm, co-founder of the Iraqi photo agency Metrography, was kidnapped in Iraq, his friends and colleagues have ended their media blackout and released information on his disappearance. Kamaran was abducted by ISIS militants on June 12, 2014, shortly after he was wounded while covering the fighting between ISIS and Kurdish... More

Tuesday Tip: How to Avoid Shilling for Controversial Subjects

Posted by on Tuesday November 14, 2017 | Photojournalism

From stories about foreign wars to domestic political rifts, there is plenty of media manipulation. Partisans for various causes are eager to use photographers to get their propaganda out. Photographers discussed strategies for avoiding that in “Documenting White Supremacy,” a story in our November issue. Here is some of their advice: “If you fall into... More

Photographer Bill Frakes Loses Sexual Harassment Appeal

Posted by on Wednesday November 8, 2017 | Photojournalism

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) has rejected photographer Bill Frakes’s appeal in a sexual harassment case, because “clear and convincing evidence” showed he had violated university sexual harassment policies, according to a report in the Omaha World-Herald. Last summer, Frakes lost his position as an adjunct professor at UNL because he had “engaged in sexual... More