Dutch photojournalist Jeroen Oerlemans, 45, was killed in Sirte, Libya, on October 2 while on assignment for the Belgian magazine Knack and other publications, Al Jazeera reports.  His body was taken to Misrata, where a doctor reported that Oerlemans had been shot in the chest by a sniper for ISIS, which has been fighting for control of Sirte for a year.

Dutch foreign minister Bert Koenders said in a statement released yesterday, “Oerlemans is a journalist who kept going where others stopped, driven to put the news into pictures in the world’s hot spots. It is profoundly sad that he has now paid the ultimate price for this.”

Oerlemans, who was represented by Panos Pictures, covered conflict and humanitarian crises in Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Israel and the Occupied Territories. He had worked for TIME, The Guardian, The International Herald Tribune, and other publications around the world.  In 2012,  Oerlemans was kidnapped and wounded in Syria; he was released after a week.

He is survived by his wife and three children, according to The Guardian.

In a statement, Robert Mahoney, Deputy Executive Director of the Committee to Protect Journalists, said, “The death of Jeroen Oerlemans is a reminder that those who bring us images and video from the frontlines often pay the heaviest price.”

Related:
Suspect Arrested in Kidnapping of Photographer Jeroen Oerlemans

Michael Christopher Brown’s Journey into the Libyan Civil War


COMMENTS

MORE POSTS

Obituary: Wally McNamee, Veteran Washington Photographer

Posted by on Monday November 20, 2017 | Obituary

Photojournalist Wallace “Wally” McNamee, whose career at The Washington Post and Newsweek magazine spanned more than 40 years, died November 17 in Virginia, the White House News Photographers Association (WHNPA) has reported. McNamee was 85. The cause of his death was not given. In addition to covering major news events including the Civil Rights movement... More

Obituary: Armando Trovati, Longtime AP Skiing Photographer, 73

Posted by on Monday August 7, 2017 | Obituary

Armando Trovati, a longtime Associated Press photographer who covered the professional skiing beat, died on Sunday. According to reports, Trovati, 73, died of lung cancer at his home in Milan. Trovati started working with the AP as a teenager. Based in Milan, he began as a darkroom assistant and messenger. According to the AP, he worked... More