We live in an era where photography is so pervasive and ephemeral that apps get multi-billion dollar valuations on the promise of deleting your images.

It’s a state of affairs that would no doubt flummox Ansel Adams, who saw in photography the possibility for “endless horizons of meaning” (today, it’s endless horizons of memes).

Readers are no doubt intimately familiar with Adams’ life and work, but we still found this short video appreciation of the master enjoyable. It details Adams’ growth as a photographer, his technique and his legacy in an era of image overload.

Enjoy.

Read More:
Explore the History of Photography in Kodak’s Vault

Hidden History of the Zoom Lens

A Brief History of Long-Lens Gotchas

 


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