Ruben Espinosa says he was barred from official events in Veracruz and harassed after this photo he took of Veracruz governor Javier Duarte was published on the cover of Proceso in April, 2014. Duarte reportedly sent staff out to buy every available copy of the magazine.

Ruben Espinosa said he was barred from official events in Veracruz and harassed after this photo he took of Veracruz governor Javier Duarte was published on the cover of Proceso in April, 2014. Duarte reportedly sent staff out to newsstands to buy up every available copy of the magazine.

Mexican authorities recently announced the arrest of a known criminal for the execution-style murder of photojournalist Ruben Espinosa and four others, according to reports by The Guardian and Al Jazeera. The killings occurred July 31 in a Mexico City apartment.

Mexican prosecutor Rodolfo Rios Garza told reporters that the suspect, who reportedly has a criminal record for rape and assault, was tied to the murders by crime scene fingerprints that matched fingerprints in a criminal database. The suspect has not been named by prosecutors.

Meanwhile, authorities are still searching for two other suspects seen on a surveillance video, leaving the apartment building around the time of the murders. Prosecutors say the three men shown in the video left the scene in a car that belonged to one of the female victims, according to the press reports.

Espinosa had covered social protests in the Mexican province of Veracruz for the newspaper Proceso, Agencia Cuartoscuro and other news outlets. He had also covered the murders of journalists in Veracruz, and advocated for the administration of Governor Javier Duarte to investigate those killings. He told other journalists he felt threatened by by the Veracruz government, and he relocated to Mexico City in June after he noticed his house was being watched and he had been followed.

Murdered along with Espinosa were his friend Nadia Vera, a social activist; Yesenia Quiróz and Mile Virginia Martín, both roommates of Vera’s; and a housekeeper, Alejandra Negrete.

On August 2, journalists held a demonstration in Mexico City demanding that the government clarify that Espinosa was targeted for his journalism, and not killed in the course of a robbery, as police investigators had first suggested. Journalists told the Mexican publication SinEmbargo that Espinosa had felt threatened by the Veracruz government, which has been suspected to have played a role in the deaths of at least 12 journalists and the disappearance of others.

Related:
Mexican Photojournalist Murdered in Mexico City, after Fleeing Threats in Veracruz
Fleeing Violence against Journalists, Veracruz Photographers Seeks Asylum in US


COMMENTS

MORE POSTS

PDN Video: Natalie Keyssar on Sexism in the Photo Industry

Posted by on Monday September 18, 2017 | Photojournalism

  Photojournalist Natalie Keyssar discusses how women (and photographers of color) are denied the same opportunities as white men in the photo industry, and why that needs to change. “It robs everyone, including white men, of the ability to understand other perspectives. In such a terribly polarized country as we’re in today, lack of empathy... More

Photojournalist Covering Rohingya Crisis for GEO Detained by Bangladeshi Authorities

Posted by on Friday September 15, 2017 | Photojournalism

Photographer Minzayar Oo, who was reporting on the Rohingya crisis in Bangladesh on assignment for GEO magazine, was detained with his assistant Hkun Lat on September 7, according to Oo’s agency, Panos Pictures. The two men have been accused of espionage. Police say the journalists entered the country on tourist visas rather than journalist visas, and... More

No More Excuses: Diversify Launches Database of Photographers of Color

Posted by on Wednesday September 13, 2017 | Photojournalism, Social Media/Web

The home page of Diversify.Photo.

After five months of planning, Diversify Photo today launched a database of 340 photographers of color from around the U.S. Brent Lewis, senior photo editor at ESPN’s The Undefeated, told PDN in May that he and independent photo editor Andrea Wise had begun compiling the database to show photo editors, art buyers and other creatives... More