Google Photos Puts Dropbox, Box on Notice with Unlimited Photo Storage, Pushes Deeper into VR

Posted by on Friday May 29, 2015 | Uncategorized

slide8a_framedGoogle is rapidly pushing cloud storage into commodity territory with a new Photos app that gives users unlimited photo storage for images with a resolution of 16-megapixels and under. The app was announced at Google’s I/O developer conference.

Photographers shooting images at higher resolutions can opt to have Google automatically resize their images to stay in the free tier or to use Google’s existing paid storage plans for their digital negatives. Google plans start at $2/month for 100GB and $10/month for 1TB.

Videos can also be stored on the photos app. The free tier supports video resolutions up to 1080p. Videos recorded at a higher resolution will either be down-converted by Google to stay in the free tier, or you can opt to store the original file in Google’s fee-based storage service.

The new Photos app is largely aimed at consumers who have photos dispersed chaotically among a growing number of devices. The app will automatically and, Google claims, intelligently, organize images based on their contents. It will also synchronize images across devices.

Several photo features from Google+, like automatic image enhancement and collage creation, are also available in Photos.

Google Photos is available now for iOS and Android devices. It’s also available through web browsers. For more insights into Google Photos, check out Steven Levy’s interview with Bradley Horowitz, Google’s head of Streams, Photos and Sharing.

Google is also pushing its Cardboard virtual reality solution to Apple devices. Cardboard is an inexpensive, open-source virtual reality headset (literally made from cardboard) that uses mobile phones as the display. It’s a lower-cost alternative to high-powered gaming headsets like the Oculus Rift and Google told I/O attendees that more than 1 million Cardboard headsets were currently in consumer’s hands (or is that heads?).

To achieve an immersive effect, videos need to be played in an specialized app. Besides bringing its Cardboard-ready apps to iOS, Google said that 360-degree YouTube videos would also be playable in Cardboard headsets.

To jumpstart 360-degree video creation, Google is partnering with GoPro on a 16-camera rig called the Jump (which is different than the virtual reality rig that GoPro revealed earlier this week). Using the rig and the Jump Assembler software, videographers will be able to capture and stitch together video that can be viewable in any Google Cardboard app, including YouTube. The Jump VR rig is due in the fall.


COMMENTS

MORE POSTS

Quick Tip: How Irving Penn Made Group Portraits Look Dynamic

Posted by on Thursday July 12, 2018 | Uncategorized

©Chris Patey
Lighting Group Portraits: Chris Patey Shares His Techniques

Like other photographers who excel at shooting group portraits, celebrity photographer Christopher Patey says he owes much to the influence of legendary photographer Irving Penn. “He was one of the masters of composing group shots, and I find myself pulling references from him almost every time in a creative conversation with an editor about group... More

New Initiative Created by Jill Greenberg Seeks Gender Parity in Advertising Photography

Posted by on Wednesday June 13, 2018 | Business, Uncategorized

Photographer Jill Greenberg has launched an online directory in an effort to promote women photographers for advertising jobs, film and television key art, and magazine covers. Called Alreadymade, the platform serves as a resource for clients looking to hire experienced women photographers. To be included on the site, photographers have to have shot at least... More

Sam Nzima, Who Took Iconic Apartheid Photo, Dies at 83

Posted by on Tuesday May 15, 2018 | Obituary, Uncategorized

South African photographer Sam Nzima, whose iconic photograph (right) from a Soweto uprising in 1976 helped turn world opinion against apartheid, died Saturday in Mpumalanga province, South Africa, according to press reports. He was 83. Nzima’s famous photograph showed a distraught 18-year-old named Mbuyisa Makhubo carrying the dead body of 13-year-old Hector Pieterson, a student... More