A man arrested while photographing the police raid to shut down the Occupy L.A. encampment last Wednesday was finally released on $10,000 bail late Friday, according to press reports. Tyson Heder was charged with assault and battery on a police office and resisting arrest.

Heder, who has worked in Hollywood as a film editor and shoots concert videos for rock bands, was among a number of freelancers at the scene of the Occupy raid working without press credentials. The Los Angeles police issued a limited number of credentials, and warned those without credentials they would be subject to arrest.

This video released by CBS shows Heder angrily confronting police officers after one of them pushed him backwards down a set of stairs. “What’s your name?” he demanded several times of the officer who pushed him, before at least two officers tackled him. Several others piled on, and it took them more than two minutes to handcuff him and haul him away.

It isn’t clear from the footage what is happening in the middle of the scrum during Heder’s arrest. At one point, Heder can be heard saying, “You are beating me.” A police officer at the scene says, “Stop resisting the officers.” Heder can also be heard saying “I’m not doing anything” several times.

After his release on bail, Heder uploaded a self-portrait on Facebook showing a black eye. He said “I look like hell and my body hurts pretty much from head to toe.”

Heder thanked his family and friends for bailing him out, and said, “I look forward to proving the charges against me to be completely and thoroughly fraudulent.”

(Watch the video, and tell us what you think of the actions of both Heder and the police officers.)

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