© Danny Goldfield. Photo: Ben, Burundi.

After months of controversy, the Park51 Islamic Cultural Center  opened in lower Manhattan on September 21 with a photo exhibition that celebrates New York’s diversity. “NYChildren” is an ongoing project by photographer Danny Goldfield, who is photographing a New York City child born in every country in the world.  The hundreds of visitors and international journalists who crowded into the refurbished storefront for the opening last night got to see the 169 photos Goldfield has taken in New York City since he began the project in 2004. It’s a feel-good debut exhibition for Park51, dubbed “the Ground Zero mosque” by protesters who opposed the opening of an Islamic cultural and prayer center within a five-minute walk of the September 11 Memorial site.

The day after the opening, Goldfield was still amazed by the crowd at the event. “I don’t know how many journalists I talked to last night,” he told PDN. He noted that some in last night’s crowd may have been wary visiting the space. “My hope is that they’ll step through the threshold and be in this pristine white gallery with 169 photos and feel more comfortable.”

Goldfield, who describes himself as “a proud Jew,” says his NYChildren project was inspired by the idea that bonding with our neighbors can strengthen communities.

In 2003, Goldfield was driving to New York from Los Angeles, where he attended film school. He stopped in Mesa, Arizona, where he met Rana Sodhi, an Indian-born Sikh whose brother was killed in a hate crime four days after September 11. Sodhi told Goldfield that after the murder, rather than living in fear, he made an effort to get to know his neighbors. By the time Goldfield got home to New York, he had hatched the idea to meet his diverse neighbors by photographing a child born in every country in the world – all living in New York City.

To find his subjects, he contacts immigrant organizations, community centers, clergy, phone card stores and restaurants. “I would say there isn’t an inch of subway that I haven’t traveled,” he notes. The project has been exhibited around New York and in Denmark, and been featured in Life, the New York Daily News, on the BBC and CNN.  Last year he self-published a book, which he is selling through Amazon and his own Web site to help fund the ongoing project.

He had just received a few advanced copies of the book last summer when a friend who works with the lower Manhattan community introduced him to Sharif El-Gamal, chairman of Park51.  After looking at the book, El-Gamal immediately suggested the project should be Park51’s first exhibition. “I just as impulsively agreed,” Goldfield recalls.

The Park51 show, like all of Goldfield’s previous exhibitions, displays the criteria he uses to choose his subjects, and a list of the countries he still wants to represent.  Goldfield says he still needs to photograph kids from 25 countries, including Andorra, Benin, Qatar, Kuwait, Palau, the Maldives, and Vanuatu. (The recent formation of South Sudan, the world’s newest nation, meant he had to add one more country to his list.) Visitors are encouraged to contact friends or neighbors and suggest new subjects. “You might catch yourself participating in a community project that’s currently housed in Park51. That’s the experience I want people to have.”

If you know a parent of a child born in one of the 25 countries remaining on his list and currently residing in New York City,  you can contact Goldfield through his Web site, dannygoldfield.com/.

© Danny Goldfield. Goldfield's book, NYChildren Photography.


COMMENTS

MORE POSTS

Photoville Returns to Brooklyn Bridge Plaza

Posted by on Wednesday September 13, 2017 | Events

Located in DUMBO’s Brooklyn Bridge Park and running September 13 to 17 and 21 to 24, the Photoville photo festival is returning with more than 75 exhibitions and installations. Visitors to Photoville will find exhibitions in shipping containers and outdoor displays, talks and workshops, a beer garden, nighttime programming, community events and more. Highlighting the... More

How Lee Friedlander Edits His Photo Books

Posted by on Wednesday July 5, 2017 | Events

lee_friedlander
Lee Friedlander's Self Portraits, published in 1970.

Lee Friedlander has published 50 books in his career to date. And he’s not stopping. The legendary photographer (born 1933) and his grandson, Giancarlo T. Roma, recently revived Haywire Press, the self-publishing company Friedlander established in the 1970s. Roma interviewed his grandfather on stage at the New York Public Library on June 20. The talk,... More

Home of Pioneering Woman Photographer Named LGBTQ Historic Site

Posted by on Wednesday June 21, 2017 | Events

Photo inscribed "The Darned Club'/A.A" Collection of Historic Richmond Town/ © Staten Island Historical Society

The Alice Austen House, the home of the trailblazing woman photographer, was designated a national site of LGBTQ history by the National Park Service on June 20.  Austen (1866-1952) lived at her waterfront home on Staten Island, New York, for decades with her companion, Gertrude Tate. The house is now a museum devoted to interpreting... More