The Aftermath Project, a non-profit organization that gives grants that help photographers tell stories about countries and communities affected by war and other armed conflict, has created a special, one-time $20,000 grant for conflict photographers.

The grant will be awarded to a photographer interested in telling a personal story of how their work covering war has affected their own life. The deadline for the grant is October 1, 2011.

“The subject can be approached in any way—portraits, landscapes, reportage, collaboration with a family of someone who has been killed, anything that explores the personal aftermath of covering war, whether that be PTSD, the aftermath of sexual assault, the aftermath of being wounded,” writes Aftermath Project director Sara Terry her announcement of the grant “This is a very open and fluid call for proposals on this subject, and we welcome any and all approaches.”

The grant was initiated by Terry in response to the “incredible sense of loss” in the photography community following the deaths of Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros in Libya earlier this year.

The Aftermath Project will also award a $5,000 honorarium to a fixer who has worked with a conflict photographer and wants to tell a written or visual story about how their work has affected their life.

Photographers and fixers who apply for the grant together are eligible for the full $25,000 award.

Download the grant application here:

http://www.theaftermathproject.org/pdf/conflictgrantapplication.pdf


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