The London Mail reports that a greeting card designer has been sued for distributing a card showing a dog dressed up to look like Che Guevara in the iconic image by Cuban photographer Alberto Korda.

According to the newspaper, Korda’s daughter filed a copyright infringement claim in France against Takkoda, a British greeting card company owned by designer Kate Polyblank. Polyblank’s husband reportedly shot an image of a neighbor’s dog for the Takkoda greeting card.

The Che Guevara photograph, popular among students around the world as an iconic image of revolution, has appeared on millions of posters and t-shirts since Korda shot it in 1960. The photographer, whose real name was Alberto Diaz Gutierrez, died in 2001.

While we await word from the French courts on this claim, you be the judge. Is this illegal copyright infringement, or fair use?

Tags:

COMMENTS

MORE POSTS

Federal Court Reinstates Photographers’ Copyright Claim Against AP, NFL

Posted by on Wednesday September 12, 2018 | Copyright/Legal

A federal appeals court in New York has reinstated a long-disputed copyright infringement claim against Associated Press (AP) and the National Football League (NFL), after the seven photographers involved in the case argued that a lower court erred in dismissing their claims. The photographers—all of whom covered NFL games and other events as AP freelancers—filed... More

Appeals Court Reinstates First Amendment Claim Against Border Patrol

Posted by on Friday August 17, 2018 | Copyright/Legal

Affirming the right of citizens to photograph law enforcement activities, the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit has reinstated a claim by activists who sued the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) for stopping them from photographing CBP activities and destroying their photographs. “The First Amendment protects the right to photograph and record... More