Each year,  the non-profit Aftermath Project awards two $20,000 grants to photographers exploring the lasting effects of conflicts on civilian populations, in order to encourage conversation about the value of journalism that goes beyond the headlines to study the aftermath of war and strife.  Grant winners and two finalists  are published in a book. Applications for the 2011 grants are now available online on the web site of the Aftermath Project. Applications must be received by November 1, 2010.
Bulaj

The Aftermath Project is funded by donations from institutions and individuals, and does not charge an application fee for entry.

The 2010 winners were Polish-born, Italy-based photographer Monika Bulaj, who won for her project “Afghanistan: Not Only The War,” which explores Sufism and other minority religions in the country; and American photographer Danny Wilcox Frazier, who is working on “Wounded Knee: Generations Endure a Massacre,” a project examining the effects of both the 1890 Wounded Knee Massacre and the 1973 uprising, during which armed Native Americans reclaimed the Wounded Knee land and held it during a 71-day standoff with Federal authorities.

(Photo © Monica Bulaj)

Related stories: 

What it Takes to Win an Aftermath Grant

After the Headlines: Sara Terry on the Aftermath Project

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