Since one of its oil wells blew out in the Gulf of Mexico more than three months ago, BP has demonstrated a certain aversion to the truth about the disaster and its consequences.

Against that backdrop, The Washington Post has reported that Gawker and other blogs have so far identified at least three BP handout photos that were digitally altered. For instance, in one image from the inside of BP's Houston command center, a staff photographer pasted images onto some blank video screens. In another, a helicopter parked on the deck of a ship was made to look as if it was flying over the Gulf of Mexico.

After the altered images came to light, a BP spokesperson posted the originals for public scrutiny, explained what alterations had been made, and said BP had instructed the staff to "refrain from doing this in the future."

Caveat emptor.

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