April 24th, 2014

Tyler Hicks Wins Robert Capa Gold Medal Award

A Westgate mall visitor shelters children during an attack by Somali gunmen last September. ©Tyler Hicks/The New York Times

A Westgate mall visitor shelters children during an attack by Somali gunmen last September. ©Tyler Hicks/The New York Times

Tyler Hicks of The New York Times has won the 2013 Robert Capa Gold Medal Award for his coverage of the attack last September on the Westgate mall in Nairobi, Kenya, the Overseas Press Club (OPC) has announced.

Hicks won the Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography last week for the same story.

The Robert Capa Award is bestowed annually for the best foreign photo coverage “requiring exceptional courage and enterprise,” according to OPC. In announcing this year’s award, OPC noted that Hicks “tells the story of a terrifying and dangerous situation. The photographer is at obvious risk, yet he continues to photograph multiple scenarios and stays on the scene to document the horrors and aftermath of the attack.”

Other winners of OPC photography prizes for work completed in 2013 included Robert Nickelsberg, winner of the Olivier Rebbot Award for best foreign photo reporting in magazines and books; Jerome Delay, winner of the John Faber Award for best foreign photo reporting in newspapers and wire services; and Marcus Bleasdale, winner of the Feature Photography Award.

Photographer Steve Ringman and reporter Craig Welch of the Seattle Times shared the Whitman Bassow Award for best coverage of an international environmental issue.

Nickelsberg won the Olivier Rebbot Award for work on his book Afghanistan: A Distant War, published last October by Prestel. “The depth of his years-long reporting shows a unique perspective and helps brings a deeper understanding to a critical geopolitical topic,” OPC said of Nickelsberg in its announcement.

Delay, an Associated Press staff photographer, won the John Faber Award for his coverage of unrest last year in the Central African Republic. OPC praised the work for its “unflinching directness.”

Bleasdale won the Feature Photography Award for his story for National Geographic called “The Last of the Viking Warriors.” OPC called it “Completely original photographic storytelling executed perfectly.”

Ringman and Welch won the Whitman Bassow Award for “Sea Change: The Pacific’s Perilous Turn,”  about the effects of rising levels of carbon dioxide on the ocean.

Images and more information about the winning projects are available on the OPC website.

Related:
Josh Haner, Tyler Hicks Win 2014 Pulitzer Prizes for Photography

April 14th, 2014

Tyler Hicks, Josh Haner Win 2014 Pulitzer Prizes for Photography

The New York Times has taken both Pulitzer Prizes for photography, prize administrators at Columbia University announced today.

See the full story at PDNOnline.com.

Related:
AP, Javier Manzano Win (2013) Pulitzer Prizes for Photography (subscription required)

January 13th, 2014

Danny Lyon Criticizes Media; Says How He Would Edit National Geographic Magazine

Photojournalist Danny Lyon delivered a sharp critique of the media, explained the main goal of his career, and reminisced about his work on the civil rights movement, motorcycle gangs and Texas prisoners at a rare public appearance last week.

Lyon was the headliner at the 2014 National Geographic Photography Seminar, a day-long event held January 9 before a standing-room-only crowd at the National Geographic offices in Washington, DC.

“I took it for granted that all the magazines lied, and since I chose the media as my field I was determined to create an American media that was truthful,” Lyon said during his talk.

He also imagined himself as editor of National Geographic, and suggested story ideas that would probably rile the magazine’s audience (read on for details).

In addition to Lyon, photographers Tyler Hicks, Wayne Lawrence, David Maisel, Newsha Tavakolian, and Vince Musi lectured about their careers and past projects. Media artist Hasan Elahi also gave a talk about his surveillance project.

Following is an edited transcript of Lyon’s talk.

(more…)

March 18th, 2011

Libya Says It Will Release Times Journalists Today

Four New York Times journalists held since Tuesday by pro-Qaddafi forces in Libya will be released today, Libyan government officials have told the US State Department. The Libyan government says that the four journalists, who include photographers Lynsey Addario and Tyler Hicks, were arrested in Ajdabiya when the Libyan army swept into the rebel-controlled city.

The Times reported on Wednesday that Addario, Hicks, the Times Beirut bureau chief, Anthony Shadid, and reporter and videographer Stephen Farrell were missing, having last made contact with editors on Tuesday. The Times reports today that the four entered the rebel-controlled eastern region without visas via the Egypt-Libya border.

In an interview with CNN, Seif Islam el-Qaddafi, son of Libyan leader Colonel Muammar Qaddafi, said via a translator, “They entered the country illegally and when the army, when they liberated the city of Ajdabiya from the terrorists and they found her, they arrest her because you know, foreigners in this place.” He added, “But then they were happy because they found out she is American, not European. And thanks to that, she will be free tomorrow.”  Qaddafi was probably referring to photographer Addario, but according to the Times, Libyan officials informed the State Department on Thursday evening that all four would be released on Friday.

(Seif Islam el-Qaddafi has previously met Addario. In 2004, Addario photographed him and his father on assignment for Time magazine.)

When the Times reported the journalists were missing, Times editor Bill Keller said in a statement, “We have talked with officials of the Libyan government in Tripoli, and they tell us they are attempting to ascertain the whereabouts of our journalists.”

Related Story:
Lynsey Addario, Tyler Hicks Missing in Libya