March 11th, 2015

Tim Matsui, TIME Win Top Prizes in 2015 World Press Multimedia Contest

Time magazine has won first prize for short documentary in the World Press Photo contest for film titled Behind the Video of Eric Garner’s Deadly Confrontation With New York Police. In the long feature category, photographer Tim Matsui has won first prize for The Long Night, a documentary he produced in conjunction with MediaStorm about teenage prostitution in Seattle. Last month, Matsui won POYi’s Documentary Project of the Year for the film.

A film titled {The And}, which explores the dynamics of relationships between couples, won first prize for Interactive Documentary. It was written and directed by Topaz Adizes and Nathan Phillips

Runners up in the multimedia competition included The New York Times, which won second place in the short documentary category for a video by Ben C. Solomon about the Ebola outbreak in Monrovia. Carlos Spottorno won third prize for his video called At the Gates of Europe, about a wave of refugees from Africa since the Arab Spring uprisings. (more…)

February 23rd, 2015

Ed Kashi, Tim Matsui Win Top Multimedia Prizes at 2015 POYi

From "Syria's Lost Generation," by 2015 POYi Multimedia Photographer of the Year Ed Kashi. ©Ed Kashi

From “Syria’s Lost Generation,” by 2015 POYi Multimedia Photographer of the Year Ed Kashi. ©Ed Kashi

Ed Kashi has won Multimedia Photographer of the Year honors at the 2015 Pictures of the Year International competition for his project called Syria’s Lost Generation, while Tim Matsui won Documentary Project of the Year for The Long Night, a film he produced with MediaStorm about teenage prostitution.

Winners of other categories in POYi’s Visual Editing Division included Katie Falkenberg of the Los Angeles Times, who won first place in the Motion News Story category for a story about a Utah town torn apart by an FBI sting operation; Eugene Richards, winner of the Motion Feature Story prize for his project in the Arkansas delta called Red Ball of Sun Slipping Down; and Lisa Krantz and Jessica Belasco of the San Antonio Express-News, first place winners of the Motion Issue Reporting category for “A Life Apart: The Toll of Obesity.”

Earlier this month, during judging for POYi’s Reportage Division, Krantz won the 2015 Community Awareness Award for the obesity project.

Judging for the Visual Editing Division ended Friday. The category included a number of editing awards for magazines and newspapers.  National Geographic magazine took Best Publication honors. The Los Angeles Times won first place for Editing Portfolio-Newspaper, while Time magazine won the top prize for Editing Portfolio-Magazine.

A complete list of the 72nd annual POYi contest winners is available online. Links to galleries of the winning entries are also on the site.


Daniel Berehulak Wins Reportage Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition
Brad Vest Named Newspaper Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition
Cameron Spencer Wins POYi Sports Photographer of the Year Honors
PDN Video Pick: A Spotlight on Underage Victims of the Illegal Sex Trade

December 4th, 2014

PDN Video Pick: A Spotlight on Underage Victims of the Illegal Sex Trade

(click “Play All” option for a two-minute trailer for the web version; click “Theatrical Version” to launch a 2:45 introduction to that version.)

Seattle photographer Tim Matsui and MediaStorm have just released The Long Night, a documentary film about teenage victims of illegal sex trade in King County, Washington. Matsui has focused on stories about sexual violence and human trafficking for more than a decade, and his new film is part of his multi-pronged project called “Leaving the Life.”

“I see the film as a broad audience outreach tool; it builds awareness,” he says, with hopes that it also serves as a catalyst for community dialogue.  His ultimate goal, he says, is to facilitate “a shift in cultural and institutional norms.”

He explains, “Some of the solutions lie in harm reduction, criminal justice reform, and police training,” to treat underage prostitutes as victims rather than criminals. “Others [solutions] are more generational: Are we teaching our daughters to be strong and self confident? Are we showing our sons how to respect and value women?”

Support for The Long Night included a $25,000 Women’s Initiative Fund grant awarded to Matsui by the Alexia Foundation in 2012. The Alexia foundation also provided post-production funding to MediaStorm.

The film is available in two versions: a 70-minute “theatrical release,” and a web version that’s presented in a series of short chapters. “We felt that breaking it down into components makes it a little more usable” to viewers who often can’t or won’t sit through an hour-long video online, says MediaStorm principal Brian Storm.

Both versions are available free-of-charge through December 7. The theatrical release is available on Matsui’s website; the web version is at MediaStorm.  After December 7, MediaStorm will charge a fee for the theatrical version, which will be available only on MediaStorm’s Vimeo feed. The fee, to be determined, will help defray production costs, Storm says. The web version will continue to be available for free on MediaStorm’s website.

Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Tim Matsui on the Women’s Initiative Grant (for PDN subscribers)

July 23rd, 2014

Tim Matsui Wins $25K Fledgling Fund Grant for Sex Trafficking Project

From "Leaving the Life:" Lisa in her robe. ©Tim Matsui

From “Leaving the Life:” Lisa in her robe. ©Tim Matsui

Photographer Tim Matsui, who has focused on stories about sexual violence and human trafficking for the past decade, has won a $25,000 Fledgling Fund grant for his project called “Leaving the Life.” Matsui will use the grant to engage audiences and spur dialogue about sex trafficking of minors in the US. He plans to produce several videos, each about 15 minutes in length, tailored for different audiences.  For instance, one of the videos will examine prostitution among minors from the perspective of law enforcement, which traditionally treats minors in the sex trade as criminals rather than victims. Another short video will present the issue from the perspective of young sex workers.

“Fledgling is supporting the initial creation of this campaign which include several live screenings of the [short videos] and a basic web platform which, in the future, will be built out,” Matusi explains.

Fledgling Fund administrators did not respond to a request for comment.

Matsui won an Alexia Foundation Women’s Initiative Grant in 2012 to document new approaches by officials in Seattle to addressing the problem of the sex trafficking of minors. He will use footage he’s already shot for that project to produce the short videos for “Leaving the Life.” Separately, he has produced a longer documentary in conjunction with MediaStorm called “The Long Night.”

The Fledgling Fund, established in 2005, provides filmmakers with grants to “move audiences to action” with outreach and audience engagement initiatives. The fund has provided nearly $12 million to support 333 projects to date.

Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Tim Matsui on the Women’s Initiative Grant (for PDN subscribers)
Frames Per Second: A Corporate Story, Told by a Journalist

August 30th, 2012

Tim Matsui Wins Alexia Foundation Women’s Initiative Grant

Tim Matsui submitted the photo above, showing a young woman in Cambodia who was being sold for sex by her mother, as part of his award-winning proposal. © Tim Matsui


The first Women’s Initiative grant from Alexia Foundation was awarded to Tim Matsui, who will use the $25,000 to document the sex trafficking of minors in Seattle and King County, Washington. According to James Dooley, executive administrator of the Alexia Foundation, “Matsui’s proposal highlighted a growing and serious problem that is an issue in nearly every city large or small throughout the United States.”

The Alexia Foundation created the Women’s Initiative grant earlier this year to support a photographer documenting “abuses against women in the United States.” The Alexia Foundation Photojournalism Advisory Committee chose Matsui, Mary Calvert and Carlos Javier Ortiz as the three finalists. Judges, including Foundation board members, an administrator from the S.I. Newhouse School of Communications at Syracuse University and Brian Storm, founder of MediaStorm, reviewed all three proposals and awarded the Women’s Initiative grant to Matsui. A symposium, fundraiser and exhibition featuring work from the Women’s Initiative as well as other Alexia Foundation photographers will take place in Fall 2013. Each year the Foundation also awards grants to student and professional photographers who, through their work, “drive change in the effort to make the world a better place.”

Matsui is a documentary, editorial and commercial photographer and multimedia producer based in Seattle. Over the course of his career he’s worked on a number of projects that deal with the sexual abuse of women, including founding a non-profit organization that uses multimedia productions as a way to start discussions on sexual violence.

Related Article:

Alexia Foundation Launches Documentary Grant Focused on Violence Against Women