December 17th, 2013

How About a Holiday Gift That Supports Photography?

It’s not only the season of giving. It’s your last chance to make a tax-deductible donation to a non-profit that you can list on your 2013 tax form. That’s why many of the non-profits that support new photographic work and photographic education are currently seeking support from folks who love photography. Here is a list of some we’ve heard from this holiday season. (Feel free to suggest other deserving non-profits in the comments section.)

If you’re looking for an alternative gift this season, consider a gift that says: We love photography, so let’s support it, too.

The Alexia Foundation
The Alexia Foundation has been making grants to support documentary projects on social change for over 20 years. In 2012, they created the Women’s Initiative Grant, supporting documentary photographic work on issues facing women. The first Women’s Initiative Grant winner, Tim Matsui, has just released a film of his work about the sex trafficking of minors, and the Alexia Foundation hopes to generate support for future grants.
https://www.alexiafoundation.org/donate

Aperture Foundation
Aperture Foundation, publishers of Aperture magazine and many photo books (like the new Emmet Gowin retrospective we raved about), has anchored their winter appeal this year to the news that they’re expanding Aperture’s visual-literacy program for children and teens. Learn more about their new educational program on their Winter Appeal page: http://www.aperture.org/blog/winter-appeal/

Blue Sky Gallery
In addition to hosting 21 solo exhibitions last year, the Portland, Oregon, non-profit also regularly holds artists’ talks that are free and open to the public. If you’re a resident of Oregon, you can match your contribution with a contribution to the Oregon Cultural Trust for a tax credit.
www.blueskygallery.org/who-we-are/about-bluesky/

Light Work
Light Work, the Syracuse, New York, non-profit that supports exhibitions, an artist-in-residency program, workshops and the publication Contact Sheet, is offering Light Work tote bags to anyone who donates $100 (while supplies last). Feeling more beneficent? Light Work offers portfolios for donors giving $1200 and more. www.lightwork.org/shop/donation/

Magnum Foundation
The non-profit Magnum Foundation supports in-depth, documentary photography projects through its Emergency Fund Grant, the Inge Morath Prize to a female photographer under the age of 30, its Human Rights Fellowships at New York University, and its partnerships with human rights and humanitarian aid organizations.  magnumfoundation.org/donate.html

The Aftermath Project
Through its annual grants, The Aftermath Project funds photo projects committed to telling the other side of the story of conflict: “What it takes for individuals to learn to live again, to rebuild destroyed lives and homes” and cope with war’s aftermath. Their  current Kickstarter campaign, to publish the latest volume of their catalogue of grant winners, “War is Only Half the Story,”  has about 48 hours left on the campaign. A pledge to the campaign allows you to pick a reward from a range of prints and gifts. Or, you can simply write The Aftermath Project a check.

September 10th, 2013

Aftermath Project Accepting Applications for $20K Grant

Applications are now being accepted for the 2014 Aftermath Project Grant, an award of $20,000 that will be given to a photographer working on a project that explores the aftermath of violent conflict. The 2014 Aftermath Project Grant is supported by the Foundation to Promote Open Society.

Photojournalist Sara Terry founded the non-profit grant-making organization The Aftermath Project in 2003 with the belief that quiet stories of people rebuilding their lives after war or other conflicts have a vital role to play in how the international community understands the effects of armed conflicts on populations.

The deadline for applications is November 11, 2013, with the winner to be announced in mid-December. In addition to the grant, The Aftermath Project will also recognize four finalists, and their work will be published alongside the winners in a book, War is Only Half the Story: Vol 8.

Recent Aftermath Project grant-winners include Stanley Greene, Andrew Lichtenstein and Davide Monteleone.

For more information and to submit an application, visit: http://theaftermathproject.org/2014-Application

Related: Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application (about Lichtenstein’s Aftermath Project Grant application)
Stanley Greene Wins 2013 Aftermath Grant
$20,000 Aftermath Project Grant for 2012 Awarded to Andrew Lichtenstein

August 29th, 2012

The Aftermath Project Now Accepting 2013 Grant Applications

The Aftermath Project announced the opening of its 2013 grant cycle, which comes with a $20,000 prize. The deadline for applications is November 5, 2012.

The goal of The Aftermath Project is to support photography projects that document what happens after a conflict has ended. The conflict can be any type of fighting that affects communities, ranging from an international war or regional battle to an ethnic strife or urban riot. Also of interest are stories that are being under-reported by mainstream media. According to application guidelines, “grant proposals should reflect an understanding of this mission.”

The 2013 grant winner and four finalists will be featured in the book War is Only Half the Story, Volume Seven, the foundation’s annual publication. The Aftermath Project has received a $15,000 matching grant from the National Endowment of the Arts (NEA) for the book and will be launching a Kickstarter campaign to raise the rest of the funds in September.

A $20,000 NEA matching grant has also been received for a re-design of theaftermathproject.org. Founder and artistic director, Sara Terry, noted in a press release that the revamped Web site will offer more resources, and better feature the work of current and past grant winners and finalists. Terry also shared the news that Gretchen Landau is joining The Aftermath Project as managing director. Landau will focus on the foundation’s fundraising and outreach initiatives.

To download a grant application, visit theaftermathproject.org.

To learn more about projects that have been awarded the grant in the past, read our interviews with The Aftermath Project’s 2012 grant winner, Andrew Lichtenstein, and 2011 grant winner, David Monteleone.

 

November 1st, 2011

Eros Hoagland Wins $20k Grant for Conflict Photogs

The Aftermath Project, a grant making organization focused on funding photojournalism covering post-conflict stories, recently awarded a special $20,000 grant to photographer Eros Hoagland, who will work on a personal project that explores how photographing conflicts has affected his own life.

In the announcement of the award, Aftermath Project founder and director Sara Terry said: “Hoagland’s project, ‘The Green Room,’ stood out for his candid discussion of several themes, including emotional disconnect; the consequences of being the son of a war photographer, John Hoagland, who was killed in El Salvador at the age of 34; the impact that choices made by war photographers have on loved ones; the mythology of war photographers; and the desire to foster a public conversation on war, photography, PTSD and our understanding of these topics.”

Hoagland, who is represented by Redux, has worked in Iraq, El Salvador, Mexico and Guatemala, among other conflict-torn areas.

The special grant for conflict photographers was established in honor of Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros, who died in April while covering the uprising in Libya. Joan Morgenstern, Danny DeVito and Rhea Perlman, Chris Meledandri, Martha Kellner, Betsy Karel and Neal Baer supported the grant.

According to Terry, the proposals The Aftermath Project received for the grant were so impressive that the organization aims to repeat the grant next year if it can find funding.

The Aftermath Project also awarded a grant of $5,000 to an unnamed translator/fixer to create a story about his work. According to the announcement, the recipient is an Iraqi citizen who worked closely with photographer Andrea Bruce and other Western journalists during the war in Iraq. He will remain anonymous until he and his family complete their emigration to the United States. Photographer Elizabeth Rappaport funded the fixer/translator grant.

January 25th, 2011

Aftermath Project Offering $65,000 In Grants for Special Projects on Sahrawi People

The Aftermath Project, an organization that awards money to photographers pursuing post-conflict documentary projects, announced a special $65,000 grant cycle funded by the Howard G. Buffet Foundation. Up to three grants totaling $65,000 will be awarded to photographers to fund stories about the Sahrawi, who are indigenous to a disputed section of the Western Sahara and are struggling for independence.

According to the grant guidelines, the projects funded by the grants will address “the aftermath issues that frame [the Sahrawi’s] ongoing struggle for independence, both in refugee camps and in diaspora.”

One of the awards will be made to an African photographer.

The Howard G. Buffett Foundation, which supports global health, humanitarian and conservation initiatives among other projects, is administered by Howard Graham Buffett, the son of investor and Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett.

Grant-winners are expected to donate prints to both the Aftermath Project and the HGBF, and to provide images for educational programs developed by the two organizations.

The deadline for applications is March 25, 2011.

More information and to apply visit www.theaftermathproject.org.