December 22nd, 2015

Nina Berman Wins 2016 Aftermath Grant For Project on War’s Toxic Legacy

Nina Berman has won the 2016 Aftermath Project Grant for “Acknowledgment of Danger,” a look at the “toxic legacy of war on the American landscape.” Berman, a documentary photographer, has published two books: Purple Hearts—Back from Iraq (2004), on wounded veterans; and Homeland (2008), a look at surveillance and paranoia in post 9/11 America. Sara Terry, photographer and founder of The Aftermath Project, announced the news on social media today.

The Aftermath Project, a nonprofit, supports the production of projects on “the lingering wounds of war” and communities recovering from conflict. Past winners of the Aftermath Project Grant include Stanley Greene, Andrew Lichtenstein and Justyna Mielnikiewicz. In August 2015, Terry announced the 2016 grant would be the last the organization would offer “for the time being.” In the coming year, the organization will “concentrate on our tenth anniversary and strategize our way forward.”

In addition to naming the 2016 grant winner, the judges also chose several finalists:

Juan Arredondo for his project, “Everybody Needs a Good Neighbor,” about the challenges faced by ex-combatants transitioning back to civilian life in Colombia, as the nation prepares for a historic peace agreement between the government and FARC in March, 2016.

Bharat Choudhary for his project, “The Silence of Others,” which examines the aftermath of the war on terror and its disastrous psychological impact on young Muslims living in the West.

Paolo Marchetti for his project “FEVER: The Awakening of European Fascism,” which documents the growing racial intolerance – exacerbated by the economic crisis and by political ideologues – expressed by many young people reacting against the massive flow of immigrants to Europe.

Brian McCarty for his project, “War Toys,” a conceptual art/photography project. With the help of expressive therapists, McCarty works with the children to make narrative photographs that recreate their experiences using locally found toys.

The judges for the 2016 grants were Terry; Denise Wolff, an editor with Aperture; photographer (and former Aftermath Project board member) Jeff Jacobson; photographer Maggie Steber; and Elizabeth Rappaport, a photographer and Aftermath Project board member.

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September 10th, 2013

Aftermath Project Accepting Applications for $20K Grant

Applications are now being accepted for the 2014 Aftermath Project Grant, an award of $20,000 that will be given to a photographer working on a project that explores the aftermath of violent conflict. The 2014 Aftermath Project Grant is supported by the Foundation to Promote Open Society.

Photojournalist Sara Terry founded the non-profit grant-making organization The Aftermath Project in 2003 with the belief that quiet stories of people rebuilding their lives after war or other conflicts have a vital role to play in how the international community understands the effects of armed conflicts on populations.

The deadline for applications is November 11, 2013, with the winner to be announced in mid-December. In addition to the grant, The Aftermath Project will also recognize four finalists, and their work will be published alongside the winners in a book, War is Only Half the Story: Vol 8.

Recent Aftermath Project grant-winners include Stanley Greene, Andrew Lichtenstein and Davide Monteleone.

For more information and to submit an application, visit: http://theaftermathproject.org/2014-Application

Related: Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application (about Lichtenstein’s Aftermath Project Grant application)
Stanley Greene Wins 2013 Aftermath Grant
$20,000 Aftermath Project Grant for 2012 Awarded to Andrew Lichtenstein

December 14th, 2012

Stanley Greene Wins 2013 Aftermath Grant

Stanley Greene has won the 2013 Aftermath Grant for his proposal to create a new project, “The Rise of Islam in the Caucasus,” The Aftermath Project organization announced today. The Aftermath Grant, worth $20,000 in 2013, supports photographers whose work addresses the legacy of conflict.

In making the announcement, The Aftermath Project noted that Greene is the first “conflict photographer,” as Greene is widely known, to win an Aftermath Project grant. Greene is a member of the photographer collective NOOR Images.

Finalists for the grant include Gwenn Dubourthoumieu, who is pursuing an ongoing project about sexual violence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo; Boryana Katsarova, who is working in post-conflict Kosovo, concentrating on the city of Kosovska Mitrovia; Isabel Kiesewetter, who is working on a project that investigates how former military bases in East and West Germany are presently being utilized; and Martino Lombezzi, whose project examines the impact of the border fence between Lebanon and Israel has on local populations.

Greene’s proposal and those of the finalists were selected from 234 entries from around the world.

The first round of judging for the grant was completed by Aftermath Project Founder Sara Terry and Aperture editor Denise Wolff. Terry and photographers Nina Berman and Eros Hoagland selected the winner and finalists.

The 2013 Aftermath Project grant is supported by The Foundation to Promote Open Society.

Related: Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application
$20,000 Aftermath Project Grant for 2012 Awarded to Andrew Lichtenstein
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Eros Hoagland Wins $20K Grant for Conflict Photographers

November 30th, 2011

$20,000 Aftermath Project Grant for 2012 Awarded to Andrew Lichtenstein

Photographer Andrew Lichtenstein has received a grant of $20,000 from The Aftermath Project, an organization that supports documentary photography that tells post-conflict stories.

Lichtenstein received the grant, which is supported by the Foundation to Promote Open Society, for his work “American Memory,” a series of landscape photographs at historical sites of conflict around the United States. “The judges found Lichtenstein’s project to be a highly original take on aftermath issues, and also found his images to be sophisticated and thought-provoking,” wrote Aftermath Project founder Sara Terry in a statement.

“Among the many photos in Lichtenstein’s work-in-progress that impressed the judges,” Terry added, “was a photo of three women in Confederate-era dress seated on a bench at the exact bus stop where Rosa Parks began her historic ride in 1955, launching the American civil rights movement (the women were participants at a recent Confederate Flag rally in honor of the 150th anniversary of the inauguration of Jefferson Davies, the Confederate leader).”

Judges for this year’s grant cycle, the organization’s sixth, included Terry, VII photo agency director Stephen Mayes, and Anne Wilkes Tucker, photography curator at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Lichtenstein was selected from a pool of 183 applicants from around the world, the organization said.

The organization also recognized four finalists, whose work will be included in the 2012 Aftermath Project book. The finalists are Christopher Capozzielo, whose project “For God, Race and Country” examines the Ku Klux Klan as it exists today; Michelle Frankfurter, whose “Destino” documents the effect Central American civil wars in the 1980s had on emigration to the United States; Simon Thorpe, whose “Toy Soldiers” is a creative documentation of Sahrawi soldiers who fought for their land in the Western Sahara; and Michael Zumstein, whose “Bon Amis” addresses Ivory Coast’s reconciliation following the contested 2010 election and resulting crisis.

Related: Eros Hoagland Wins $20k Grant for Conflict Photogs

Above: Photo © Andrew Lichtenstein. At the exact bus stop where Rosa Parks boarded her famous city bus trip to fight segregation in 1955, participants in a Sons of Confederate Veterans “Confederate Heritage Rally” wait to march up Dexter Avenue in downtown Montgomery to recreate the inauguration of Jefferson Davis 150 years later.

More Awards News

August 25th, 2011

Call for Applications: $20,000 Aftermath Project Grant

In 2012 The Aftermath Project will award a $20,000 grant to a photographer exploring the lasting effects of conflicts on civilian populations. The work of the grant winners and four finalists will be published in the sixth volume of War is Only Half the Story, the book published annually by The Aftermath Project. Applications for the 2012 grants are now being accepted (click here to download a PDF of the application). Applications must be received by November 1, 2011.

In the call for applications, Aftermath Project founder Sara Terry noted that in the project’s five years of existence, “almost all the proposals we have received (with a few exceptions) have been about the dangers of post-conflict situations, full of (warranted) concerns about often depressing conditions. Those are important projects, and I’m proud that we have recognized many of them. But as we enter our sixth year of granting, I would like to add another note to the conversation. For me, from the beginning, covering the aftermath of conflict has also always included an interest in better understanding the human spirit in conditions such as these – I remember being absolutely confounded by the Bosnian Muslims I met who were determined to go back to the homes from which Bosnian Serb neighbors had chased them away (and worse) during the war. I wanted to try to understand where that spirit comes from, how it survives, and perhaps why it offers hope that humanity can rise again despite the most hateful of conflicts.”

The Aftermath Project is funded by donations from institutions and individuals, and does not charge an application fee.

Related stories:
Davide Monteleone Wins 2011 Aftermath Grant