February 3rd, 2015

Grant Deadlines: Magnum/Inge Morath, Manuel Rivera-Ortiz and Pulitzer Center

Deadlines are coming up for grants supporting women photographers, and photographers working on social issues.

The 2015 Inge Morath Award 

© Magnum Photos/Inge Morath

Inge Morath. © Magnum Photos/Inge Morath

Magnum and the Inge Morath Foundation have announced deadlines for the 14th annual Inge Morath Award: submissions must be received by April 30th, 2015.

The two foundations award $5,000 to a female photographer under the age of 30, in support of the completion of a long-term documentary project. One winner and up to two finalists are selected by a jury composed of Magnum photographers and the director of the Inge Morath Foundation.

Morath was an Austrian-born photographer who was associated with Magnum Photos for nearly 50 years. The Inge Morath Foundation was established after her death in 2002, and her colleagues at Magnum created an award in her honor.

Shannon Jensen won the last award, in 2014, for “A Long Walk.” For more information, visit ingemorath.org. All submissions must be made online at ingemorath.submittable.com/submit

The Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation for Documentary Photography & Film 2015

The Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation for Documentary Photography & Film has opened a call for submissions for its global grant; both professional and emerging photographers of all nationalities are encouraged to submit documentary photography projects on topics of human suffering and unrest, forgotten communities, exploited lands and people, on communities ravaged by war, poverty, famine, disease, and the exploitation of global resources.

The foundation awards one $5,000 grant to one documentary project based mostly on submitted proposal and a 15-image portfolio. Photographers must show a commitment to the field of reportage and documentary photography.

Submissions are judged in three rounds by a panel of professionals representing the documentary photography industry. The first round assesses entries based on submission worthiness; A pre-selection jury will selects the “Top-24” and consequently the “Top-12” portfolios during round two. The “Top 12″ shortlisted portfolios will be featured and displayed during Les Rencontres d’Arles in Arles, France.

The deadline for submissions is March 31, 2015. The selected project must be completed the calendar year following receipt of the grant. For more details, rules and submission guidelines, visit mrofoundation.org.

The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting’s $150,000 Nuclear Threat Initiative Grant

The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting is expanding its coverage of nuclear security issues, thanks to a new grant from the Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI). The Pulitzer Center plans to produce a series of stories on under-covered nuclear issues for its “Going Nuclear” gateway

The 18-month grant is worth $150,000, earmarked for nuclear security projects like “Plutonium Mountain,” a report by David Hoffman of The Washington Post and Eben Harrell of Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, which the Pulitzer Center previously funded.

The NTI is a non-partisan, nonprofit organization that has supported independent news coverage on weapons of mass destruction since its founding in 2001.

For information on Pulitzer Center reporting grants, see pulitzercenter.org/grants.

February 5th, 2014

Pulitzer Center Releases Annual Report Highlighting Photography

The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, which provides funding to journalists and news organizations, allowing them to carry out independent, in-depth reporting, released its 2013 annual report today. Several projects involving photographers were among those highlighted in the report, providing a good overview of the types of work the Center is funding, and the types of projects the media is willing to publish, given the means.

They included:

Sea Change, the multimedia story on ocean acidification created by The Seattle Times and staff photographer Steve Ringman (our story about the creation of Sea Change is here.)

A series of photo stories and reports on Japan’s collapsing social safety net, including images by Shiho Fukada. (Our story on Fukada’s project on Japan’s “disposable workers” is here.)

An issue of Poetry magazine dedicated to Afghan landau poems and women’s rights, with photographs by Seamus Murphy. (For more on Murphy’s coverage of Afghanistan, beginning in 1994, see our story on his multimedia project, “Afghanistan: A Darkness Visible.”)

Documentary photographer Larry Price’s work on child labor in Philippine gold mines.

Reporting on gun violence in Chicago featuring photography by Carlos Javier Ortiz. (Our story about Ortiz’s long-term project, “Too Young to Die,” is here.)

And reporting on the perpetual conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo that includes work by photographer and filmmaker Fiona Lloyd-Davies.

Related Article: Getting Funding from The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting (available to subscribers with login).

June 25th, 2012

Pulitzer Center Publishes First iBook with Photographer Greg Constantine

The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, a non-profit organization that provides key support to photographers and writers working on long-term investigative journalism projects, made its first foray into digital book publishing late last week with the release of “In Search of Home,” an iBook about statelessness, featuring the photography of Greg Constantine and essays by Stephanie Hanes.

The interactive, 49-page book, grew out Hanes and Constantine’s long-term reporting project on “stateless” people, who are denied the basic rights of citizenship in the countries in which they live, often for religious and ethnic reasons. The iBook focuses on three populations who have no nationality: the Rohingya from Burma, the Nubians of Kenya, and people of Haitian descent living in the Dominican Republic. It features four slideshows of Constantine’s images, an audio slideshow that provides an overview on the problems faced by people who live in legal limbo without national identity, as well as other features, like an interactive map and timeline.

“In Search of Home” is the first in a series of iBooks that will be produced by the Pulitzer Center. The project, according to a post by Jon Sawyer, director of the Pulitzer Center,  on the organization’s blog, “is part of a broader Pulitzer Center initiative, seeking out new platforms and partners to extend the work of journalists we support and to make use of the extraordinary presentation of multimedia material now possible on tablets and other mobile devices.”

Proceeds from “In Search of Home,” which is being sold for $4.99 in the iTunes store and can be viewed using the iBook 2 app for iPad and iPhone, will go to Constantine and Hanes, minus the 30 percent Apple charges to carry the book on iTunes.

“We hope to make these books the capstone for the best of our projects, giving readers an immersive, narratively rich way of engaging the issues they cover,” Sawyer said. “We believe these presentations will appeal to all audiences, and especially to the university and secondary-school students that have become a major focus of the Pulitzer Center’s work.”

Related: Q&A: Getting Funding from The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting
Picturing Non-Profit Journalism
Picture Story: An Emmy-Winning AIDS Documentary in Poetry and Pictures
Field Studies: Exploring the Complexities of War-Torn Congo