February 10th, 2015

Cameron Spencer Wins POYi Sports Photographer of the Year Honors

©Cameron Spencer

©Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

Photographer Cameron Spencer of Getty Images has been named Sports Photographer of the Year at the 2015 Pictures of the Year International competition, organizers announced today. His portfolio included a variety of dramatic sports action and feature images from a wide array of sporting events, including the 2014 Winter Olympics.

Runners up for the award were second place winner Al Bello of Getty Images and third place winner Patrick Smith.

In other sports categories, first prize for a Sports Action photo went to Al Bello of Getty Images for his dramatic shot of New York Giants receiver making a one-handed touchdown catch.

The winners of other sports categories are:

Sports Feature: Robert Sabo/Getty (1); Cameron Spencer/Getty (2); Ricky Carioti
Recreational Sports: Jacob Ehrbahn (1); Sol Neelman (2); Austin Anthony/AP (3)
Sports Action: Al Bello/Getty (1); Alex Livesey/Getty (2); Joel Marklund
Winter Olympics: Lucas Jackson/Reuters (1); Joel Marklund (2); Ezra Shaw/Getty
Sports Picture Story: Jacob Ehrbahn (1); Cristina Aldehuela (2); Yasuyoshi Chiba (3)

Judging for the POYi competition began at the University of Missouri on February 2, and will continue through February 20. Sports photo categories fall under the competition’s News Division. Judging of Reportage Division entries begins tomorrow.

Related:
Brad Vest Named Newspaper Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition

March 6th, 2014

PDN Video Pick: Making an Award-Winning Story of One Woman’s Resilience

Sensei from ora on Vimeo.

Ora DeKornfeld, a communications major at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, won first prize for her video “Sensei” in the Multimedia Feature category of the 2014 Pictures of the Year International competition. Brilliantly shot and edited, DeKornfeld’s video tells the powerful story of a rape victim’s survival, resilience and determination. DeKornfeld explains how she won her subject’s trust, found a way to portray events in the past through evocative imagery, and produced a tight, dramatic narrative.

PDN: What was this project was for? How did it get started?
Ora DeKornfeld: That project was made as a final documentary piece for a journalism class. The assignment was to make a vérité documentary. It was a challenge for us to [record] something actually happening, instead of fully relying on B-roll over interview audio. My professor [Chad Stevens] assigned the project knowing that was unrealistic, so this project deviated greatly from that initial assignment, but that’s how it started.

PDN: How did you find this subject, and how get her to open up?
OD: I went to this neighborhood in Durham (North Carolina)–a pretty dynamic low-income neighborhood, and I saw a flyer for self-defense classes and that’s something I have always been personally interested in, and I wanted to do a piece that touched on women’s issues. So I called the number and ended up talking to Brenda, the subject, and she was immediately open. She told me that the reason she got into martial arts was because she was a victim of a violent crime. I didn’t push that at the time, but it was an immediate indicator that she had a real deep experience that motivated her. So I said, would it be OK if I made a documentary about you? She was really open to it.
I went to her karate class on Tuesday and Saturday for two weeks, then I asked if I could come to her house, meet her family and start hanging out with her there. And I kind of just stayed until she said, “OK, Ora, you need to get out of my house.” But through that experience we bonded. (more…)

February 26th, 2014

Brent McDonald Named 2014 POYi Multimedia Photographer of the Year

Video journalist Brent McDonald of The New York Times has won 2014 Multimedia Photographer of the Year at the Pictures of the Year International competition, organizers have announced. He won for a portfolio that included a video called “A Deadly Dance” about a surge of heroin use in Portland, Maine; and a story about Christine Quinn’s campaign for mayor of New York.

A Deadly Dance from The New York Times – Video on Vimeo.

Documentary Project of the Year honors went to NPR’s Planet Money team for a project called “Planet Money Makes a T-Shirt.” The project also won first prize for Documentary Journalism (multimedia).

National Geographic won Best eBook (app) honors for “The Photography Issue, October 2013.”  The Best Website award went to Narratively.

Adam Panczuk won the Best Photography Book award for “Karczeby,” about the people of a region of east Poland with a strong cultural attachment to the land.

Contest organizers also announced on Monday that The New York Times won Best Newspaper honors, while National Geographic won for Best Magazine.

Judging for the competition, which began February 5, ended today. Various teams of jurors judged entries in five separate divisions: News, Sports, Reportage, Editing, and Multimedia. (Click links to see our stories on category winners in each division.)

Related:

Who’s Winning at POYi? PDN Links to First Place Entries in Editing and Multimedia Categories
Daniel Berehulak Named 2014 POYi Freelance Photographer of the Year
Barabara Davidson Named 2014 POYi Newspaper Photographer of the Year
Patrick Smith Named 2014 POYi Sports Photographer of the Year

February 24th, 2014

Who’s Winning at POYi? PDN Links to First Place Entries in Editing and Multimedia Categories

©The Denver Post/Craig F. Walker. From "Cecil & Carl," first place winner of POYi's Newspaper Feature Story Editing category.

©The Denver Post/Craig F. Walker. From “Cecil & Carl,” first place winner of POYi’s Newspaper Feature Story Editing category.

After naming Newspaper and Freelance Photographers of the Year and winners of various other categories during the past three weeks, the Pictures of the Year International competition continues to release results in other categories.

Jurors have weighed entries for the Editing and Multimedia Division categories this past week. Here’s a round-up of winners in those categories so far, with links to online versions of the stories and videos:

Editing Division:
News & Issue Story Editing (newspaper): The Washington Post, “Never the Same: Refuge Stories from the Syrian Exodus.” The entry features photography by Linda Davidson.

Feature Story Editing (newspaper): The Denver Post, “Cecil & Carl,” featuring photography by Craig F. Walker.

News & Issue Story Editing (magazine): National Geographic, “The New Oil Landscape,” featuring photography by Eugene Richards.

Feature Story Editing (magazine): TIME magazine, “A Portrait of Domestic Violence,” featuring photography by Sara Naomi Lewkowicz.

Series or Special Section: The New York Times, “The Lady Jaguars–Year 2,” featuring photography by Ruth Fremson.

Editing Portfolio (newspaper): Becky Hanger and Jeffrey Furticella, The New York Times.

Editing Portfolio (magazine): Kira Pollack, Time Magazine.

McDougall Overall in Excellence in Editing Award: The New York Times.

Best Newspaper and Best Magazine winners have yet to be named.

Multimedia Division:

Feature: “Sensei” by freelancer Ora DeKornfeld.

Sports Feature: “The Lights Go Out: the final season of Hollywood Park” by a team from the Los Angeles Times, including videographers Spencer Bakalar and Bethany Mollenkof.

News: “Spanish Bank Scandal Wipes Out Savings,” by freelancers Almudena Toral, Suzanne Daley and Rachel Chaundler.

Issue Reporting: “The Last Clinic,” by Maisie Crow (See Maisie Crow’s web site for the trailer and photographs).

Jurors will select winners of the Documentary Journalism category today. Tomorrow, jurors will select Documentary Project of the Year, Best eBook, Best Website and Multimedia Photographer of the Year.

Related:

Daniel Berehulak Named 2014 POYI Freelance Photographer of the Year

Barbara Davidson Named 2014 POYi Newspaper Photographer of the Year

Patrick Smith Named POYi’s 2014 Sports Photographer of the Year

February 18th, 2014

Daniel Berehulak Named 2014 POYi Freelance Photographer of the Year

©Daniel Berehulak from his project "Maha Kumbh Mela"

©Daniel Berehulak from his project “Maha Kumbh Mela”

Daniel Berehulak has been named Photographer of the Year–Freelance at the 2014 Pictures of the Year International Competition. Berehulak, who is based in New Delhi, India, won the honor for a portfolio that includes stories about malnutrition and drug addiction in Afghanistan, the Hindu pilgrimage Maha Kumbh Mela, and celebrations by South Africans of Nelson Mandela just after his death last December.

The prize, which was decided yesterday and announced today, were part of the Reportage Division of the POYi competition. Yesterday, POYi announced on its web site that Annalisa Natali Murri won the Community Awareness Award her project “Len’s Daughters,” about women still struggling to survive after a massive earthquake in Armenia in 1988. Robin Hammond won the World Understanding Award for his project “Condemned,” about the neglect and abuse of the mentally ill in war-torn African countries.

PDN posted a story yesterday identifying other winners of Reportage Division categories.

Jurors for the Reportage Division included Danny Wilcox Frazier, Renée C. Byer, Richard Cahan, and Lara Solt.

Judging of POYi’s Editing Division entries began today. Multimedia Division judging begins on Saturday.

Related articles:

Robin Hammond Wins 2014 POYi World Understanding Award

Robin Hammond Wins $30,000 W. Eugene Smith Fund Grant (subscription required)

National Geographic Experiments with a New Form of Digital Storytelling
(Nick Nichols’ Serengeti Lions)

Barbara Davidson Names 2014 POYi Newspaper Photographer of the Year

Patrick Smith Named POYi’s 2014 Sports Photographer of the Year

February 14th, 2014

Patrick Smith Named POYi’s 2014 Sports Photographer of the Year

©Patrick Smith

©Patrick Smith

Freelance photographer Patrick Smith has won Sports Photographer of the Year honors at the 2014 Pictures of the Year International competition (POYi). Smith won for a diverse portfolio that emphasized his NASCAR coverage, but included sports action, portraits and feature photos of athletes and fans of various sports.

National Geographic magazine has won the top prize in the Sports Story Editing category for a story titled “On the Trail with the First Skiers,” a story about skiers in a remote area of China and the clues they offer about the evolution of the sport. The story was photographed by Jonas Bendiksen.

Other categories in the 2014 POYi Sports Division contest and their first-place winners include:

Sports Action: Mark J. Terrill of Associated Press for his photograph of welterweight boxer Pablo Cesar Cano landing a punch on the face of opponent Ashley Theophane.

Sports Feature: Jabin Botsford, a student at Western Kentucky University, for an image he shot at a Kentucky high school cheerleading competition.

Recreational Sports: Alex Goodlett of the Daily Herald (Provo, Utah), for an image he shot at a high school volleyball match.

Sports Picture Story:  Daniel Ochoa De Olza for a story about bullfighting in Spain.

Judges for the Sports Division entries were James Colton, Elsa Garrison, and John McDonnell

Judging for the Reportage Division (formerly Magazine Division) entries begins tomorrow and continues through this weekend. Editing and Multimedia Division entries will be judged next week.

Related
Barbara Davidson Named 2014 POYi Newspaper Photographer of the Year

POYi Posts Winning Entries for Its Newspaper Division Contest (And PDN Names the Photographers)

February 11th, 2014

Barbara Davidson Named 2014 POYi Newspaper Photographer of the Year

Los Angeles Times photographer Barbara Davidson has won Newspaper Photographer of the Year honors in the 2014 Pictures of the Year International (POYi) competition, contest organizers announced this afternoon.

“[T]he judges noted a strong balance of powerful aesthetic with solid journalistic content” in Davidson’s portfolio, POYi organizers said in a prepared statement. Her portfolio included two picture stories: “A Healing Bond,” about a girl from Afghanistan who came to the US for medical treatment; and “LA’s Shooting Season,” about the trauma team at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center.

Runners up for Newspaper Photographer of the Year honors were James Oatway of The Sunday Times (Johannesburg) and Lacy Atkins of the San Francisco Chronicle.

Winners of all the POYi Newspaper Division categories were identified by PDN earlier today.

Meanwhile, POYi judges also selected winners in two Sports Division categories today. They include Alex Goodlett of the Daily Herald (Provo, Utah), who won first prize in the Recreational Sports category; and Daniel Ochoa De Olza won first prize for Sports Picture Story.

Related:
POYi Posts Winning Entries for Its Newspaper Division Contest (And PDN Names the Photographers)

February 11th, 2014

POYi Posts Winning Entries for Its Newspaper Division Contest (And PDN Names the Photographers)

 

©Taslima Akhter

©Taslima Akhter

Taslima Akhter of Bangladesh has won first prize in Spot News category of the Newspaper Division in the Picture of the Year International (POYi) competition, and Niclas Hammarström has won top prize for the General News category.

POYi organizers have not yet announced the names of the winners, pending completion of judging in all divisions and categories of the competition on February 25. But POYi is posting the winning entries on its web site as they are selected, enabling visitors to the site to figure out who they are. (The Newspaper Photographer of the Year entry has not been posted, however.)

Akhter and Hammarström both won prizes for heartbreaking images. Akhter’s image (shown here), called “Final Embrace,” shows two garment workers who died embracing each other in the collapse of a factory building in Dhaka, Bangladesh last April. Hammarström’s prize-winning photograph, from Aleppo, Syria, shows the badly burned face of a child.

Other categories and first prize winners for the Newspaper Division include:

Feature Pictures Story: Lacy Atkins (San Francisco Chronicle) for “100 Black Men Community Charter School.” (original story here.)
Issue Reporting Picture Story:  Lisa Krantz (San Antonio Express News) for “Twice Betrayed: Military Sexual Trauma.”
News Picture Story:  Tyler Hicks (The New York Times) for “Massacre at a Kenyan Mall.” (see Lens Blog)
Portrait Series: Sara Brincher Galbiati for “Circus Kids of Kabul.”
Portrait: Magnus Wennman (Aftonbladet) for “Merullah.” (Fourth slide in gallery here.)
Feature: John Stanmeyer for “Signal.” (lead and second image here.)
Natural Disaster: Philippe Lopez (AFP/Getty) for “Philippines Weather Typhoon.

Judging for the POYi Sports Division began yesterday. Mark J. Terrill of Associated Press won first prize for Sports Action for his photograph of welterweight boxer Pablo Cesar Cano landing a punch on the face of opponent Ashley Theophane. Jabin Botsford, a student at Western Kentucky University, won first prize in the Sports Feature for an image he shot at a Kentucky high school cheerleading competition.

Other Sports Division category winners will be selected today and tomorrow. Judging for the Reportage Division (formerly Magazine Division) entries begins on Friday and continues through this weekend. Editing and Multimedia Division entries will be judged next week.

February 27th, 2013

POYi Punts on Pellegrin Controversy

©Paolo Pellegrin

©Paolo Pellegrin

Pictures of the Year International organizers have finally weighed in on the controversy surrounding Paolo Pellegrin’s prize-winning contest entry. And they dodged the issue that is central to the debate: the legitimacy of one particular documentary-like image of a subject posing with a gun in a parking garage–at Pellegrin’s request. (The subject told PDN that the image “put him in a bad light.”)

Instead, POYi addresses only the less complicated issues about the sloppiness of Pellegrin’s captions for the story.

POYi’s statement about entry, posted in the POYi Winners Gallery below Pellegrin’s story, reads as follows:

“The spirit of Pictures of the Year International is to honor photojournalists and celebrate their outstanding documentary photography. We do not probe for reasons to disqualify work. POY understands that errors may occur in captions submitted by photographers. We are happy to make corrections and acknowledge the errors. Story summaries and captions are ‘published’ when posted on the POY website. Any misunderstanding regarding self-authorship for ‘published’ captions or story summaries will be corrected by the photographer. POY affirms the awards.”

That response to the controversy is even more tepid than that of the organizers of World Press Photo, which at least addressed the guy-with-gun image directly when they issued their statement about it yesterday:

“The jury is of the opinion that although a more complete and accurate introduction and captions should have been made available by the photographer, the jury was not fundamentally mislead by the picture in the story or the caption that was included with it.”

Asked what safeguards they have in place to vet winning entries for manipulation, World Press Photo told PDN today that they reserve the right “to ask for raw files or untoned scans and consult an external photo expert to advise on possible manipulation. This analysis focuses only on technical facts.”

Rick Shaw, director of POYi, did not immediately respond to PDN’s request for an interview about the POYi statement.

But what the POYi and WPP statements about the Pellegrin entry suggest is that the photo contests are equipped by their rules to deal perfectly well with black and white issues, and less well-equipped to deal with any ethical gray areas.

It is, after all, easier to come up with guidelines about technical questions of how much image manipulation is too much, than it is to make rules about what kinds of actions on the part of a photographer might be misleading or damaging to the subject.

But until the contests are willing to take on such ethical gray areas when they arise, they’re leaving photographers a lot of room to “make things happen,” as long as it doesn’t happen in Photoshop, and as long as the captions pass a basic smell test.

Related:
World Press Hits Pellegrin with Wet Noodle (And Other Contest Scandals)

Paolo Pellegrin and His Subject at Odds Over Photograph

February 25th, 2013

POYi Update: The New York Times and The Denver Post Excel

©The Denver Post

©The Denver Post

The New York Times and The Denver Post have both won two top prizes so far in the Multimedia Division of the Pictures of the Year International competition. Multimedia judging began on Friday. It is the final division for the competition, which ends tomorrow.

The New York Times won first prize in both the News Multimedia Story and the Feature Multimedia categories. The winning news multimedia entry, about Syrian rebel fighters, was shot by freelance video journalist Ben Solomon. The feature multimedia entry, about a couple’s struggle with the husband’s dementia, was part of the paper’s series called The Vanishing Mind, and included photographs by freelancer Béatrice de Géa.

Last week, the Times won top prize in for Best Newspaper, a POYi Editing Division category. Runners up for Best Newspaper were The Los Angeles Times and The Washington Post, respectively.

The Denver Post, meanwhile, won the MacDougall Overall Excellence in Editing Award (also part of the Editing Division categories judged last week), as well as first prize in the Issue Reporting Multimedia Story and Sports Multimedia Story categories.

The issue reporting prize was for a project by Mahala Gaylord, Joe Amon, Meghan Lyden, and Tim Rasmussen about two heroin addicts struggling to get by on the streets of Denver. (Still photos from the project also won second prize in the Issue Reporting Picture Story category during the first week of the competition.)

The paper won the Sports Multimedia Story prize for a  project by Mahala Gaylord titled “Trey’s Team,” about a high school football player’s recovery from a head injury.

In the Campaign 2012 Multimedia Story category, Jason Reed and Larry Downing of Reuters won first prize for their story titled “Chasing Obama.”

Among other POYi prize winners in recent days was National Geographic, which won first place for Best Magazine, a POYi Editing Division category.  Runners up for the prize were New York magazine and GEOthema, which took second and third prize, respectively.

TIME magazine won first prize in the Editing Portfolio–Magazine category for its Person of the Year feature about Barack Obama, photographed by Nadav Kander.

POYi Jurors will weigh Documentary Project of the Year entries today. The POYi judging ends tomorrow with the selection of winners in Best eBook & eProject, Best Website, and Multimedia Photographer of the Year categories.