February 8th, 2013

Associated Press Wins Top Portrait Prizes at POYi

POYi Portrait winner ©Associate Press/Daniel Ochoa de Olza

POYi Portrait winner ©Associate Press/Daniel Ochoa de Olza

Associated Press has picked up two first prize awards in the Portrait and Portrait Series categories of the 70th annual POYi competition. The wire service now has 5 first prize awards after three days of POYI judging.

AP photographer Daniel Ochoa de Olza won top prize in the Portrait category for a very pirate-like image of Spanish bullfighter Juan Jose Padilla, made just before the matador’s ritual entrance to the bullring in Brihuega, Spain last April. Second prize went to freelance photographer Louie Palu. PDN has not yet been able to identify the third place winner. (POYi posts winning images, but does not announce the photographers’ names until all judging is completed at the end of February.)

AP photographer Oded Balilty won first prize in the Portrait Series category for his photographs of Palestinian stone throwers–men who use slingshots against Israeli soldiers. Balilty, who is based in Tel Aviv, was able to get the images because of his extensive knowledge of the region, and network of local contacts.

Second and third prize in the Portrait Series category went to photographer Magnus Wennman, a staff photographer at the Aftonbladet newspaper in Sweden, and Polish freelance photographer Maciek Nabrdalik, respectively.

Earlier this week, AP won top prizes in the Spot News, Campaign 2012, and Feature image categories.

All contest categories, with links to winning entries so far, are on the POYi Web site.

Related:
POYi Announces Campaign, Spot News, and Feature Category Winners

December 30th, 2010

Photographer Platon Describes How He Evaded Burma’s Secret Police

TIME magazine’s new cover story looks at the life of Nobel Prize-winner Aung Sang Suu Kyi since Burma’s military regime released her from house arrest in November. TIME.com has a video interview with photographer Platon, who describes the lengths he and reporter Hannah Beech had to go to in order to meet with their subject inside Burma, where most foreign journalists have been banned.  His tale involves disguises, a car chase, and a meeting with a woman who is revered as a heroine both inside her country and around the world.

Also on TIME.com you can see some of Platon’s color and black-and-white portraits of Suu Kyi.