October 15th, 2014

Attention Photojournalists: Upcoming Grant and Prize Deadlines

Looking for support for your visual journalism? Take note of these calls for entries.

Tim Hetherington Grant
A joint initiative of World Press Photo and Human Rights Watch, the Tim Hetherington Grant is a 20,000 euro prize awarded annually to a visual journalist. The grant is intended to help photographers and filmmakers finish ongoing projects on a human rights theme. The deadline to enter is October 31. The grant was created in memory of Tim Hetherington, who was killed in April 2011 while covering fighting in Misrata, Libya. Past winners of this juried prize have included Olivier Jobard and Fernando Moleres.
www.worldpressphoto.org/tim-hetherington-grant

Photo Philanthropy Activist Awards
PhotoPhilanthropy, which connects photographers with nonprofits to drive action for social change, is now accepting entries in its 2014 Activist Awards, open to all professional and emerging photographers who have collaborated with a nonprofit organization on a photo project. The grand prize for a professional photographer is $15,000. A prize of $5,000 will be awarded to an emerging photographer. The deadline is December 3, 2014. The jury will be announced later this month.
photophilanthropy.org/award/

Open Society Moving Walls
Open Society Foundations is now accepting proposals for Moving Walls 2015, an exhibition which will open June 2015 at the Open Society Foundations’ offices in New York City. The application deadline is November 18. Moving Walls highlights long-term photo-based documentary projects addressing human rights or social justice issues in an area where Open Society is active. Open Society covers the cost of printing, travel to attend the opening, and return shipment of photos, and provides a $2,500 participation fee.
www.opensocietyfoundations.org/grants/moving-walls

Related Articles

Olivier Jobard Wins 2013 Tim Hetherington Grant
Liz Hingley Wins PhotoPhilanthropy Prize

September 27th, 2013

Russian Photographer Detained After Greenpeace Ship Boarded

Denis Sinyakov, a freelance photographer based in Moscow and represented by Redux Pictures, was among the 30 people detained by Russian authorities after they seized the Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise. According to The New York Times, Russia’s Federal Security Service boarded the ship on Thursday, September 19, after two activists climbed an oil rig as part of a protest near the Prirazlomnaya platform in the Pechora Sea. The Arctic Sunrise was then towed to the Russian port city of Murmansk.

Greenpeace released a statement earlier today condemning the ruling of Russian courts to remand 22 of the detained people, including Sinyakov, for up to two months “pending an investigation into piracy charges.” The remaining eight people will be held for three days while they wait for a new hearing. In the same statement, Greenpeace called the piracy charges “unjustified,” and noted the protest was peaceful, in international waters and meant to raise awareness of the oil industry’s environmental exploitation of the Arctic. They have dubbed the detained activists the “Arctic 30.”

Reporters Without Borders noted that a judge ruled on Thursday to detain Sinyakov for two months because he travels abroad frequently and therefore “might try to elude authorities.”

Greenpeace has been posting frequent updates on the situation on its website, greenpeace.org, and many American and international news organizations are reporting on the story.

June 11th, 2013

Photographer Injured in Istanbul Protests

On Sunday, June 2, photojournalist Antonio Bolfo of Reportage by Getty was injured in Istanbul after police forces fired tear gas canisters into a crowd of protesters and press. Bolfo was in the Besiktas neighborhood, covering demonstrations, when one of the tear gas canisters struck and broke his leg.

Bolfo says he and photojournalist Nicole Tung had been covering the protests for two days and that during that time they “had numerous close calls of getting shot with gas canisters.” He adds, “The police were not always lobbing them at the 45 degrees as they are supposed to, they were shooting line drives at us. They were aiming at people and using the canisters as a weapon.”

Tung had already left the demonstration to file her images when Bolfo was struck. However, photographer Patrick Tombola, one of several photographers and reporters covering the event, had stayed behind with Bolfo and helped him to a triage station at a local mosque. Bolfo and Tung later flew back to New York City for his recovery.

Bolfo happened to arrive in Istanbul on Friday, May 31, the same day that police began violently cracking down on demonstrations. The protests had begun in Istanbul a week earlier, sparked by an announcement that a public park in Taksim Square was being turned into a shopping mall. The movement has now grown into civil unrest focusing on the Turkish government.

Prior to arriving in Istanbul, Bolfo had been covering the civil war in Syria for several weeks, and hoped to use the visit to Turkey for rest. Instead, he and Tung spent two days covering the demonstrations.

There have been reports of police targeting members of the press during the protests, which Bolfo found was the case on the ground. Bolfo, who is familiar with police force tactics after documenting the New York City Police Department in his series “NYPD: Operation Impact 1” and “NYPD: Operation Impact 2,” says that police are often following orders from higher level government officials. “I think officials in the U.S. are more willing to let peaceful protests run their course,” Bolfo explains. “They understand, from history, that using force against a peaceful demonstration usually causes trouble for any government … Once violence is unleashed, it is very hard to cap. In this case, I think the police violence towards a peaceful sit-in is wrong. But I also understand that the police then need to react aggressively towards violent protesters to protect themselves and people’s property. It becomes a vicious cycle that is very hard to end.”

His advice to photographers planning on covering the protests in Turkey: “Once projectiles start flying, get to cover. It sucks being taken out of a story because of injury, or worse.”

*Update: Reporters Without Borders reports that photographer Mathias Depardon was injured in Istanbul on June 11 while covering police attempts to clear Taksim Square of protesters. Depardon said a projectile fired by police (he said he was unsure what the projectile was) struck his mask.

Related Articles from the PDN Archive:

What To Expect If You’re Injured on Assignment
Low-Cost Insurance For Photojournalists Working Abroad
2012 Marty Forscher Fellowship Fund Professional Winner: Antonio Bolfo
2013 PDN‘s 30 Photographer: Nicole Tung

March 22nd, 2013

Upcoming Deadlines for Grants, Fellowships Up to $10,000

It’s officially spring. Deadlines for some big grants are approaching.

Inge Morath Award
Administered by the Magnum Foundation, the Inge Morath Award of $5,000 is given annually to a female photojournalist under the age of 30. The Award supports the completion of a long-term documentary project, and is juried by Magnum photographers and the director of the Inge Morath Foundation.
Deadline: April 30.
www.ingemorath.org/index.php/2013/01/the-inge-morath-award-2013-guidelines/

Getty Grants for Editorial Photography
Starting April 1, Getty will be accepting applications for its 2013 Grants for Editorial Photography. Five grants of $10,000 each will be awarded to photojournalists “pursuing projects of personal and journalistic significance.” Deadline: May 1.
imagery.gettyimages.com/getty_images_grants/overview.aspx

The Aaron Siskind Foundation
The Aaron Siskind Foundation offers grants of up to $10,000 each to individual photographers, selected by a panel of judges. The entry fee is $10.  Applications are open to US citizens and legal permanent residents 21 years of age and older, and there is no requirement regarding subject matter, genre or process, except that the work must involve photography (no video).  Deadline: May 24.
aaronsiskind.org/grant.html

W. Eugene Smith Grant for Humanistic Photography
Each year the W. Eugene Smith Fund awards a grant (in 2012, the award was $30,000) to a photographer whose past work and proposed project follow the tradition of W. Eugene Smith’s concerned photography and dedicated compassion. The board of trustees of the W. Eugene Smith Fund appoints a three-member jury to evaluate written proposals and photos. There is a $50 application fee. Deadine: End of May.
smithfund.org/eugene-smith-grant

February 15th, 2013

Paul Hansen Wins 2012 World Press Photo of the Year

© Paul Hansen, Sweden, Dagens Nyheter

© Paul Hansen, Sweden, Dagens Nyheter

Swedish photographer Paul Hansen won the 2012 World Press Photo of the Year for an image that shows a group of men carrying the bodies of two dead children in Gaza City, Palestine. The World Press Organization announced the winners of the 56th annual contest at a press conference February 15 in Amsterdam.

Hansen, who is a photographer for the Swedish newspaper Dagens Nyheter, shot the winning photograph last November after an Israeli missile attack destroyed the family’s home. This year’s chair of the jury was Santiago Lyon, vice president and director of photography at The Associated Press. In an announcement released by World Press Photo, fellow juror member Mayu Mohanna, a photographer and curator based in Peru, said about Hansen’s winning photo: “The strength of the pictures lies in the way it contrasts the anger and sorrow of the adults with the innocence of the children. It’s a picture I will not forget.”

Hansen will receive a 10,000 Euro award and other prizes at a ceremony to be held in Amsterdam in April.

The World Press Photo Contest honors outstanding photojournalism, both single pictures and photo stories, in several categories, including Spot News, General News, People in the News, Sports, Contemporary Issues, Daily Life, Arts and Entertainment, Portraits, and Nature.

Hansen’s winning image also placed first in the Spot News Singles category. Coverage of the Syria took many of the other top news prizes. Rodrigo Abd, an Associated Press photographer, won first in the General News/Singles  category for his photo of a woman injured by shelling in Syria. Alessio Romenzi’s coverage of the war in Syria won first in General News/Stories.

Other first place winners include Paul Nicklen, who won first place in Nature Stories for images on Emperor penguins. Nadav Kander won first in Staged Portraits for a black-and-white photo of actor Daniel Kaluuya. Jan Grarup’s story on a women’s basketball team in Mogadishu, Somalia won first place in Sports Features.

Related Article:
Paul Hansen of Dagens Nyheter Wins POYi Newspaper Photographer of the Year

February 1st, 2013

Sinclair, Dimmock Win World Press Multimedia Contest

Too-Young-to-Wed

A still from “Too Young to Wed,” by Stephanie Sinclair and Jessica Dimmock, both of VII Photo.

Stephanie Sinclair and Jessica Dimmock won first place in the Online Feature category of the 2013 World Press Photo Multimedia Contest for “Too Young to Wed.” The documentary multimedia project was produced for the Web and featured Sinclair’s images with motion work by Dimmock. It explores the cultural practice of allowing older men to marry girls under the age of 18 in countries like Ethiopia, Yemen and Afghanistan.

The World Press Photo organization announced its multimedia awards in three categories today in Amsterdam. All first-place winners for the 2013 Multimedia Contest will receive a cash award of 1,500 euros. Second and third place winners will receive a Golden Eye Award and a diploma.

The Too Young to Wed website is a partnership between the United Nations Population Fund and VII Photo. Other winners in the Online Feature category were Liz O. Baylen of the Los Angeles Times for “Dying for Relief: Bitter Pills,” which focuses on overcoming addiction to prescription pills; and Yang Enze of Southern Metropolis Daily for “Dreams on Freewheels” about seven members of China’s Disabled Track Cycling Team, who competed in the 2012 London Paralympic Games.

World Press Photo awarded Pep Bonet of Noor Images first place in the Online Short category for “Into the Shadows.” The online film focuses on the struggles of immigrants living in Johannesburg. Second place in this category went to Arkasha Stevenson of the Los Angeles Times for “Living with a Secret,” which explores gender identity in children. Jérôme Sessini of Magnum Photos won third place for his online short “Aleppo Battleground” about members of the Free Syria Army.

The third category of the World Press Photo Multimedia Contest was Interactive Documentary, which recognizes interactive online projects that feature a “combination of photography and/or film, with animation, graphics, illustrations, sound or text.” First place was awarded to Miquel Dewever-Plana and Isabelle Fougère for “Alma, a Tale of Violence” about gang violence in Guatemala. Jeremy Mendes and Leanne Allison won second place for “Bear 71” about a female grizzly bear; and Claire O’Neill, photo editor at National Public Radio (NPR) won third place for “Lost and Found: Discover a Black-and-White Era in Full Color” about a photo historian who found a collection of photos taken in the 1930s in the trash. An honorable mention in this category went to Jake Price for “UnknownSpring,” which chronicles a Japanese community recovering from the tsunami.

The jury members for this year’s World Press Photo Multimedia Contest were Keith W. Jenkins of NPR, photojournalists Samuel Bollendorff and Susan Meiselas, Kang Kyung-ran of Frontline News Service, writer and poet Patrick Mudekereza, Bjarke Myrthu of Storyplanet.com, Caspar Sonnen of IDFA DocLab and Alan Stoga of Zemi Communications.

This is the third year that World Press Photo, a non-profit which supports visual journalism through educational programs, grants and awards, has honored multimedia storytelling. Michiel Munneke, managing director of World Press Photo, noted that “with the multimedia competition we are trying to do justice to what we see happening in the field. Our ambition is to inspire photographers to move forward and explore new territories.”

To see a complete list of winners and to view the winning projects, visit www.worldpressphoto.org.

Related Articles:

Samuel Aranda Wins 2012 World Press Photo of the Year

World Press Photo Multimedia Winners Announced

January 31st, 2013

NPPA Honors Storm, Estrin, Harrity and Dimick

The National Press Photographers Association (NPPA) has awarded its annual Clifton C. Edom Award to Brian Storm, founder of multimedia production company MediaStorm, the photojournalists’ organization announced today. The award, named for the first head of the photojournalism program at the University of Missouri at Columbia and the founder of the awards now known as Pictures of the Year International, recognizes an individual who inspires and motivates members of the photojournalism community.

NPPA also announced several other awards.

The Joseph A. Sprague Memorial Award was awarded to two recipients:  photographer Charles W. “Chick” Harrity, a former contributor to US News & World Report, and Dennis Dimick, executive environment editor and interim director of photography at National Geographic Magazine.

Jim Estrin, senior photographer at The New York Times and editor of the LENS blog will receive the Kenneth P. McLaughlin Award of Merit, given to those who render “continuing outstanding service in the interests of news photography.” John Harrington, photographer and writer on business issues, received the J. Winton Lemen Fellowship Award for service in the interests of press photography.

A full list of winners and honors can be found on the website NPPA.org.

October 30th, 2012

PPE 2012: Ed Kashi and Julie Winokur on Cross-Platform Storytelling

For the PhotoPlus seminar “How to Evolve Projects Across Media Platforms,” partners and spouses Ed Kashi and Julie Winokur took the audience through some of the multimedia projects they’ve worked on together. Kashi, a photojournalist with VII, and Winokur, a writer and filmmaker, first collaborated on magazine articles. But as they noted numerous times throughout the discussion, it’s important to think about all of the different outlets where you can show your work, and focusing just on print is not sustainable because commissions from magazines are dwindling. They added that being a single skillset photographer is an idea that is starting to fade away.

Winokur began the seminar by taking us through “Bring It To The Table,” her current project. This personal documentary video follows Winokur around the country as she asks people to literally “sit at her table” to discuss politics. She started the project by raising $30,000 on Kickstarter, which Winokur said helped build an audience of about 280 people who are now invested in its success. She has since recorded a number of conversations between herself and different people on the political spectrum. She is now at the point where she’s trying to find distribution for the Web-based series. Social media has played a crucial role in getting the word out: Winokur has been posting short clips of footage on Facebook and Twitter in order to draw people back to the site bringit2thetable.org. Her strategy is to repurpose the material and post it where people are already interacting with content. The challenges remaining are figuring how to get people to see the series and how to monetize it. Winokur noted that “Bring It To The Table” has received a lot of “earned media” with many publications writing about the project itself, but no media outlets have been willing to show the final Web series in its entirety.

So how did Winokur evolve from a print journalist to a filmmaker? We discovered the answer when she and Kashi took us through their first multimedia project, “Aging in America.” The series, which they began around 17 years ago, was initially conceived as a book and exhibition. They financed the first four years of the project themselves, and later got assignments and commissions for the work; they also licensed some of the images and received grants. About halfway through the seven-year project, they met Brian Storm, who was then working at MSNBC. He offered to do a multimedia piece about the series, which consisted of stills and audio. This sparked the idea of recording Winokur’s interviews with their subjects on video. This resulted in over 100 hours of footage, which also included some b-roll. They turned all of the material into a one-hour documentary, which aired on PBS and is still used at universities across the country as a teaching tool in programs like nursing, medicine and psychology.

The Sandwich Generation,” which focused on Winokur’s father, who was suffering from dementia, was a natural next step for the duo. They partnered with Storm again, who by this time had formed MediaStorm. It would be the first time that Kashi and Winokur turned the camera on themselves as they documented caring for the elderly man. It was also the first time Kashi would shoot still and moving imagery with a cross-platform project in mind. The final result was a multimedia work consisting of still photos, video and audio.

Other projects discussed during the seminar were “Curse of the Black Gold,” a stills and audio project about oil in the Niger Delta; “India’s Fast Lane to the Future,” a stills, video and audio project done as a five-part series while on assignment for National Geographic; “The Leaves Keep Falling,” a project about the effects of Agent Orange in Vietnam that consists of stills, video and audio, and was done on commission for an NGO; and “Three” and “Photojournalisms,” which are multimedia extensions for two books that Kashi published.

Some of the tips given by Kashi and Winokur about multimedia work were:

• Always think about the end goal when shooting stills and moving imagery for multimedia work. They recommend being aware of the narrative you’re trying to tell when capturing both.
• As print resources continue to shrink, consider partnering with NGOs and other organizations as a way to disseminate work you are passionate about.
• Consider how publications want to extend printed articles via their websites and tablet editions when pitching ideas.
• Conduct your audio interviews first in order to get to know your subjects and establish the narrative that the multimedia component will follow. It’s also the fastest way to get educated about the topic.
• Don’t try to shoot all of the video and still imagery yourself. Kashi noted, for example, that on the National Geographic assignment he focused on the still images while his fixer recorded the video footage.

Related Article:

Ed Kashi and Julie Winokur on the Work-Home Balance

October 17th, 2012

Aris Messinis Wins the Photo Trophy at the Bayeux-Calvados Awards

A rebel fighter plays guitar during a gunfight in Syrte, Libya. © 2011 – Libya – AFP / Aris Messinis

AFP photographer Aris Messinis won the Photo Trophy at this year’s Prix Bayeux-Calvados des Correspondants de Guerre, a festival held in Bayeux, France, that focuses on war reporting. The 7,000-euro prize, sponsored by Nikon, was awarded to Messinis last week for his coverage of the Battle of Sirte in Libya.

Messinis has been with the AFP since 2003, and is currently the chief photographer for the agency’s photo department in Athens. He covered the Arab Spring in Libya and Egypt and exhibited work in the 2012 Visa pour l’Image International Festival of Photojournalism.

Other photographers honored during the week-long event were Ed Ou of Reportage by Getty Images, who won the Young Reporter Prize for his work on the Egyptian revolution; and Manu Brabo of the Associated Press, who won The Public Prize for his images of the Libyan revolution. They each received a 3,000-euro prize; CAPA Television sponsored Ou’s prize and the Town of Bayeux sponsored Brabo’s.

The Bayeux-Calvados Award of War Correspondents, which began in 1994, awarded a total of ten prizes to journalists reporting on “a conflict situation or its impact on civilians, or news stories involving the defense of freedom and democracy.” Award categories included print, television, radio, photographic and online reporting. This year, 54 reports were submitted for consideration. Magnum photographer Gilles Peress served as the president of the 46-person jury. Notable jurors included photographers Karim Ben Khelifa, Jérôme Delay (AP) and Laurent Van der Stockt (Getty Images); Régis Le Sommier of Paris Match; Patrick Baz of AFP; Philippe le Barillier of La Presse de la Manche; and Thierry Oberle of Le Figaro.

May 11th, 2012

Want to Shoot Like Ben Lowy? There’s a New Lens for That.

In a post on The New York Times Lens blog, photojournalist Ben Lowy discusses collaborating with Hipstamatic on a “lens” and “film” combination for the popular photo app. Lowy’s series “iLibya,” shot during the Arab Spring, was made using his iPhone and the photographer is a proponent of using his mobile device on assignment as well as for personal work. His decision to create a Hipstamatic option that’s less stylized than most speaks to the growing concern that using the app for photojournalism is somewhat misleading due to the effects that it can impart. Many critics argue that using a lens or filter on Hipstamatic is similar to editing an image in Photoshop.

Lowy says he contacted Hipstamatic about creating an option in the app that better adheres to newspaper standards for photojournalists when he returned from Libya. He describes the Ben Lowy Lens as being “pure and fairly straightforward” and “slightly desaturated, clarity is up, it’s contrasty.”

Now that there’s soon to be a Ben Lowy Lens, we started to think about what Hipstamatic lenses named for other photographers might look like. If you had your own Hipstamatic lens, what would it do?