April 28th, 2016

Bassam Khabieh Wins Robert Capa Gold Medal for Syria Coverage

The body of a dead man is seen next to blood stains at a field hospital, after what activists said were air and missile strikes, in the Douma neighborhood of Damascus, Syria December 13, 2015. Douma in Syria, an area controlled by rebels fighting to topple President Bashar al-Assad, has been shelled continuously for the past three years. The injured are taken to basements and shelters transformed into field hospitals run by medical staff who have stayed in the battered neighborhood of Damascus.

The body of a dead man is seen next to blood stains at a field hospital, after what activists said were air and missile strikes, in the Douma neighborhood of Damascus, Syria December 13, 2015. © Bassam Khabieh / Reuters

At an event this evening in New York City, The Overseas Press Club of America (OPC) will award the 2015 Robert Capa Gold Medal for photography to Reuters photographer Bassam Khabieh for his coverage of the Syrian civil war, the organization has announced. The award is given for “photographic reporting from abroad requiring exceptional courage and enterprise.” In grisly images that depict dead and injured men, and wounded children, in a makeshift field hospital in Damascus, Khabieh’s images show the brutal reality of the war in Syria, now in its fifth year.

The Overseas Press Club statement about the story, “Field Hospital Damascus,” notes the danger of living and working in Syria as a journalist. A Syria native who left an information technology career to photograph the war, Khabieh began working for Reuters in 2013. “Further setting this entry apart from the others was the courage and enterprise required not only to cover but live day in and day out in one of the most hostile and unpredictable environments on the planet,” the OPC said in a statement. More than 100 journalists have been killed in Syria since the start of the civil war in March, 2011.

Stephen Dupont will receive The Olivier Rebbot Award, which honors “photographic reporting from abroad in magazines or books,” for Generation AK: The Afghanistan Wars, 1993-2012 (Steidl, 2015).

The John Faber Award, which recognizes “reporting from abroad in newspapers or news services,” will go to Mauricio Lima, Sergey Ponomarev, Tyler Hicks and Daniel Etter for their coverage of the migrant crisis for The New York Times. The photographers recently won a Breaking News Photography Pulitzer Prize for the same work.

Another New York Times-published story, Daniel Berehulak’s “High in the Himalayas, A Search After the Nepal Earthquake Yields Grim Results,” will receive The Feature Photography Award for “photography published in any medium on an international theme.”

The OPC will livestream the awards event here beginning at 7:30 EST.

Related:
Marcus Bleasdale Wins 2014 Robert Capa Gold Medal
Tyler Hicks Wins Robert Capa Gold Medal Award

April 24th, 2014

Tyler Hicks Wins Robert Capa Gold Medal Award

A Westgate mall visitor shelters children during an attack by Somali gunmen last September. ©Tyler Hicks/The New York Times

A Westgate mall visitor shelters children during an attack by Somali gunmen last September. ©Tyler Hicks/The New York Times

Tyler Hicks of The New York Times has won the 2013 Robert Capa Gold Medal Award for his coverage of the attack last September on the Westgate mall in Nairobi, Kenya, the Overseas Press Club (OPC) has announced.

Continue reading at PDNonline.com.

Related:
Josh Haner, Tyler Hicks Win 2014 Pulitzer Prizes for Photography

April 24th, 2013

Fabio Bucciarelli Wins Robert Capa Gold Medal Award

©Fabio Bucciarelli

©Fabio Bucciarelli

Fabio Bucciarelli, who has covered the civil war in Syria for Agence France-Presse, has won the Robert Capa Gold Medal Award, the Overseas Press Club (OPC) has announced. Bucciarelli won the award for a portfolio of images titled “Battle to Death,” showing Free Syrian Army soldiers battling intensely against government forces in the streets of Aleppo.

In announcing the award, OPC said, “The images from this portfolio put you ‘in the moment’ and have a palatable sense of urgency. There is a consistency to the images that helps the viewer identify with the subjects and the perils they are encountering.”

The award, given annually by the OPC, recognizes photographers who have shown exceptional enterprise and courage while covering world news events.

In other OPC award categories, freelance photographer Samuel James won the Olivier Rebbot Award for  best photographic reporting from abroad in magazines and books. James won for “The Water of My Land,” a story about oil production and its consequence in the Niger Delta. The story was published in Harper’s magazine.

Bernat Armangue of The Associated Press won the OPC’s John Faber Award for feature photography. Armangue won for his portfolio of images about the conflict in Gaza.

Oded Balilty, also of The Associated Press, also won a feature photography award for his story about an ultra-orthodox wedding near Tel Aviv.

An awards ceremony will be held tonight in New York City. A complete list of award recipients is available on the OPC Web site.