October 15th, 2014

Attention Photojournalists: Upcoming Grant and Prize Deadlines

Looking for support for your visual journalism? Take note of these calls for entries.

Tim Hetherington Grant
A joint initiative of World Press Photo and Human Rights Watch, the Tim Hetherington Grant is a 20,000 euro prize awarded annually to a visual journalist. The grant is intended to help photographers and filmmakers finish ongoing projects on a human rights theme. The deadline to enter is October 31. The grant was created in memory of Tim Hetherington, who was killed in April 2011 while covering fighting in Misrata, Libya. Past winners of this juried prize have included Olivier Jobard and Fernando Moleres.
www.worldpressphoto.org/tim-hetherington-grant

Photo Philanthropy Activist Awards
PhotoPhilanthropy, which connects photographers with nonprofits to drive action for social change, is now accepting entries in its 2014 Activist Awards, open to all professional and emerging photographers who have collaborated with a nonprofit organization on a photo project. The grand prize for a professional photographer is $15,000. A prize of $5,000 will be awarded to an emerging photographer. The deadline is December 3, 2014. The jury will be announced later this month.
photophilanthropy.org/award/

Open Society Moving Walls
Open Society Foundations is now accepting proposals for Moving Walls 2015, an exhibition which will open June 2015 at the Open Society Foundations’ offices in New York City. The application deadline is November 18. Moving Walls highlights long-term photo-based documentary projects addressing human rights or social justice issues in an area where Open Society is active. Open Society covers the cost of printing, travel to attend the opening, and return shipment of photos, and provides a $2,500 participation fee.
www.opensocietyfoundations.org/grants/moving-walls

Related Articles

Olivier Jobard Wins 2013 Tim Hetherington Grant
Liz Hingley Wins PhotoPhilanthropy Prize

October 7th, 2014

Founders of Everyday Feeds Launch @EverydayEverywhere, “Family of Man for the Modern Age”

everydayTwo years after photographer Peter DiCampo and writer Austin Merrill launched Everyday Africa to share images that defy stereotypes about the continent, the popular Instagram feed has spawned multiple imitations, including Everyday Asia, Everyday Middle East, Everyday Iran, Everyday Sri Lanka, and Everyday USA. Now photographers behind 11 of the feeds have launched @EverydayEverywhere
and have invited photographers around the world to contribute by posting images to Instagram with the hashtag #everydayeverywhere.

The central feed will share a common mission: To disseminate images that promote greater understanding of the world. “We hope that when you put this body of work together, it’s a ‘Family of Man’ in the modern age,” DiCampo says, referring to the ambitious 1955 exhibition which featured 273 photographers, “celebrating commonalities, and fighting stereotypes in each region.”

He adds that the loose roster of photographers contributing the feeds are not a photo agency or a collective. “We’re happy this has become a promotional device for [photographers] but we don’t want them participating because of that. We want them to be excited about the project.”

DiCampo says that one or two images a day will be posted to @everydayeverywhere. Guest curators, working on the feed for two weeks at a time, will select the images that appear on @everydayeverywhere. For now, current contributors to Everyday feeds will serve as curators, but the contributors plan to invite an international group of curators to participate. DiCampo explains, “We want a variety of people: photo editors, artists, scholars, thinkers, musicians.”  Since the launch of Everyday Everywhere, Grant Slater and Austin Merrill have been the first and second guest curators, selecting images that had been posted on Everyday Eastern Europe, Everyday Bangladesh, Everyday Black America, Everyday Iran and Everyday NBNJ, which shows images from New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Contributors to Everyday decided to create a centralized Everyday feed during three days of meetings at the Open Society Foundations in New York City. The meetings, held during the Photoville photo festival, where an exhibition of work from 11 feeds was hosted by Instagram, gathered more than 30 contributors from around the world, says DiCampo. Though many had previously shared advice and ideas via Skype or email, few of the contributors had met in person.

“We’ve been talking for a long time about how to organize all this, how to encourage the Everyday concept to continue spreading while at the same time having some central structure,” DiCampo says in the press release the group issued on September 30.

To support the expansion of the Everyday project, the contributors who met in New York City also formed committees to address concerns common to all the feeds. “There’s now an events committee, an educational committee, a technical committee to help,” says DiCampo, who along with Merrill has used Everyday Africa imagery to conduct a visual literacy class in the Bronx where students can contribute to Everyday Bronx. He adds that a book of images posted to Everyday Africa is also in the works.

Related Article
Picture Story: Everyday Africa on Instagram

June 17th, 2014

What We’re Following on Instagram This Week

Here’s what the @pdnonline folks are checking out this week on Instagram.

© Cengiz Yar (@hfwh)

© Cengiz Yar (@hfwh)

Cengiz Yar, Jr @burndiary
Burn, the online magazine for emerging photographers founded by David Alan Harvey, has been using Instagram to post photo essays: one photographer sharing photos from somewhere in the world for seven days. This week: Cengiz Yar, Jr., (@hfwh) posting from Syria, mainly the Kurdish-controlled region, and from a refugee camp for Syrians in Lebanon.

 

© Patricia Lay Dorsey (@patricialaydorsey)

© Patricia Lay Dorsey (@patricialaydorsey)

@socphotogallery
Thanks to PDN’s 30 photographer Zun Lee (@zunleephoto), whose work we featured last week on PDN Photo of the Day and on the @pdnonline Instagram feed, for introducing us to this one. Social Photography is using Instagram as a virtual gallery and online forum in connection with its physical gallery exhibition this month at Indy India Art Gallery in Indianapolis. Social Photography is fostering a dialogue about how social media and the sharing of images is changing both photography and how we view our daily lives. In addition to Zun Lee, contributing photographers have included Samantha Box, Lauren Bohn and Patricia Lay Dorsey.

© Daro Sulakauri (@darosulakauri)

© Daro Sulakauri (@darosulakauri)

Daro Sulakauri for @opensocietyfoundations
Daro Sulakauri (@darosulakauri) is taking over the IG feed of Open Society Foundations, posting from Tchiatura, a manganese-mining town in the Republic of Georgia. The story is brutal, the images beautiful.

© Carl De Keyzer/Magnum Photos (@carldekeyzer of @magnumphotos)

© Carl De Keyzer/Magnum Photos (@carldekeyzer of @magnumphotos)

Carl De Keyzer for @newyorkerphoto
Magnum photographer Carl De Keyzer (@carldekeyzer) is taking followers of the New Yorker Photo Booth to an exotic locale called his backyard. All week he’s posting from his home and garden. De Keyzer lives in a restored castle “somewhere between Ghent and Brussels in Belgium.” This proves, yet again, that you don’t have to venture too far to make great photos, especially if you live in a restored castle and have a garden with peacocks and geese and a big white dog.

May 20th, 2014

Open Society, Smith Memorial Fund, Burn Magazine, Boulat Association Calling for Grant Applications

The W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund,  Open Society Foundations, Association Pierre et Alexandra Boulat, and Burn Magazine are all soliciting applications for major photojournalism grants. Deadlines are fast approaching.

The W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund has issued its last call for entries for its $30,000 Grant in Humanistic Photography. There is a $50 application fee, and the deadline for entries is May 31.

The grant is awarded annually to a photographer whose past work and proposed project follows the documentary tradition of legendary photojournalist W. Eugene Smith. Recent winners include Robin Hammond, Peter van Agtmael, and Krisanne Johnson.

The W. Eugene Smith Memorial fund is also calling for entries for the $5,000 Howard Chapnick Grant, which is awarded for education, research, or special projects undertaken in support of the field of photojournalism. Applications for that grant are due July 15, and there is no application fee. See smithfund.org for full details.

The Association Pierre et Alexandra Boulat, based in Paris, has put out a call for entries for the 8,000 euro (about $11,000) Pierre & Alexandra Boulat Grant for photojournalism. The grant is given “in order to allow the winner to produce a story that has never been told but that the photographer cannot find support for within the media,” the association says on its web site. Past winners include Arnau Bach, Maciek Nabrdalik, and Lizzie Saadin.

Applications are due by June 7. There is no application fee. See the association’s web site for an application and guidelines.

The Open Society Foundations Documentary Photography Project is soliciting proposals for its 2014 Audience Engagement Grant program. The grants, in varying amounts, are designed to help documentary photographers and photo-based artists use their work to affect change by engaging with NGO partners to reach targeted audiences. The deadline for applications is July 8, 2014.

For the first time, OSF is awarding Audience Engagement Grants for training workshops, to help applicants develop their projects, as well as grants for project implementation. See the OSF web site for additional details and application guidelines.

Burn Magazine has announced a call for entries for its $10,000 Emerging Photographer Fund grant. There is a $25 application fee, and the deadline for entries is July 31. The grant, initiated in 2008 by Burn magazine founder David Alan Harvey, is intended to support the continuation of the winners’ personal projects. Past winners have included Diana Markosian, Matt Lutton, and Davide Monteleone. More information is available on the Burn magazine web site.

Related:

Open Society Announces 2013 Audience Engagement Grant Winners
Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Joseph Rodriguez on the Audience Engagement Grant (PDN subscription required)
Robin Hammond Wins $30,000 W. Eugene Smith Fund Grant

April 2nd, 2014

Alexia Foundation, Open Society Calling for Submissions

The Alexia Foundation and the Open Society Foundations separately announced calls for submissions from photographers yesterday.

The Alexia Foundation issued a call for entries for its 2014 Women’s Initiative Grant, which will provide a $25,000 grant for the production of a project “on a significant issue involving and affecting women,” the foundation said in its announcement.

“Unlike the first Women’s Initiative grant, which specifically focused on abuse of women in the United States, this call for entries is intended to permit the photographer to propose a serious documentary photographic or multimedia project encompassing any issue involving women anywhere in the world,” the foundation says.

The deadline for grant applications is June 30, 2014. More details are available at the Alexia Foundation website.

Meanwhile, The Open Society Documentary Photography Project is calling for photo projects for an upcoming group exhibition on surveillance. The exhibition will include the work of five or six photographers, according to Open Society Foundations (OSF).

The deadline for applications is May 1, 2014.

“We are seeking photo-based projects that explore surveillance-related issues from a variety of perspectives. We encourage applicants to interpret the theme broadly,” OSF said in the announcement.

Called Moving Walls 22: Watching You, Watching Me: Photography in an Age of Surveillance, the exhibition is scheduled to run from October 29, 2014, to May 2015 at Open Society Foundations–New York. See the OSF website for complete application information.

February 28th, 2014

Facebook’s Teru Kuwayama on How To Use Social Media for Documentary Storytelling

Long before he went to work for Facebook as the social media giant’s liaison to the photo community, photographer Teru Kuwuyama saw social media as a tool for photographers “to eliminate the gatekeepers and the editors, and to be our own operators,” he told a standing-room-only crowd at the Aperture Gallery in New York on Tuesday.  Old media models formed in “an analogue era” no longer exist, but he said many photographers who have been “adaptable” to social platforms are using them to reach and engage audiences.

Kuwayama spoke along with Lev Manovich of the Software Studies Initiative at “Documentary, Expanded: Interventions in Social Media,” a panel moderated by photographer Susan Meiselas, executive director and board member of the Magnum Foundation, which organized the talk as part of its Photography, Expanded program. Photography, Expanded held its first conference, in collaboration with the Open Society Foundations Documentary Photography Project, in April 2013, Meiselas said, to encourage photographers to expand their storytelling beyond the still image at a time when “we all felt the ground shifting beneath our feet” due to a shortage of assignments and production budgets from traditional media. Kuwayama shared work by photographers who are using Instagram to connect with audiences — though not, in most cases, to make money with their images.

He began by showing his own social-media-based project, Basetrack. After having worked in Afghanistan as an embedded photojournalist, Kuwayama won a James S. Knight Fellowship at Stanford, where he came up with a plan to gather a small group of embedded photographers who would post images and information about a Marine battalion in Afghanistan for their families back home. Launched in 2010, Basetrack was “basically a tricked out blog,” he said, with a map and a countdown clock to the end of the Marines’ deployment, but equally important was the Basetrack Facebook page, which “became a rallying point for the community.” Basetrack was never intended to reach more than about 1,000 viewers. “Who cares about this 20-year-old Marine who was 8 when this war started? It was clear it was his mom, his sister,” Kuwayama explained.
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