November 13th, 2013

Open Society Announces 2013 Audience Engagement Grant Winners

The Open Society Foundations (OSF) has announced the winners of its 2013 Audience Engagement Grants. The annual grants, which vary in dollar amounts, supports projects that provide ways for audiences to take a more direct role in making change happen. The grantees partner with organizations to present the work. Most grantees collaborate with the communities they’ve covered to create and share the work.

The winners are:

Jason DaSilva in partnership with AXS Lab
Filmmaker Jason DaSilva, who has multiple sclerosis, and AXS Lab have created an online tool, AXS Map, which allows users to review and rate businesses’ accessibility. A new feature on their platform enables users to upload photographs when sharing feedback.

Elyor Nematov in partnership with Central Asia on the Move
Elyor Nematov, who has documented life in foreign cities for fellow Kyrgyz, is working with Central Asia on the Move to help Kyrgyz youth to understand their rights before leaving Kyrgyzstan. Nematov will exhibit his photographs in the southern cities of Batken, Jalalabad, and Osh while distributing resource guides on the legal, medical, and social services in Russia.

Peter DiCampo in partnership with Austin Merrill, the Learning About Multimedia Project, the Bronx Documentary Center, and Unchartered Digital
Photographer Peter DiCampo and his partners are creating a curriculum for New York City students using images from Everyday Africa, an online collection of cellphone images taken by photographers based in Africa. Students will learn how to document their own neighborhoods, families, and culture as they are taught media literacy, and will be able to upload images to an interactive website.

John Willis in partnership with Lakota Circle Village, Lakota Peace Making Court, and KILI Radio Voice of the Lakota Nation
Photographer John Willis and his partners are working to counter the negative effects of outsider representations of Lakota people and culture on Lakota youth. They will use images from Willis’s Views from the Reservation as a catalyst for intergenerational dialogue on what Lakota values are missing from mainstream narratives. Through community forums and storytelling workshops, youth will use elders’ knowledge of Lakota history, language, and traditions to help guide them in creating their own narratives of what it means to be Lakota today. These projects will be exhibited at community centers throughout Pine Ridge Reservation; participants will share their experiences on KILI Radio.

More information can be found on the Open Society Foundations website.

Related articles:
Open Society Announces 2012 Audience Engagement Grant Winners

September 10th, 2013

Aftermath Project Accepting Applications for $20K Grant

Applications are now being accepted for the 2014 Aftermath Project Grant, an award of $20,000 that will be given to a photographer working on a project that explores the aftermath of violent conflict. The 2014 Aftermath Project Grant is supported by the Foundation to Promote Open Society.

Photojournalist Sara Terry founded the non-profit grant-making organization The Aftermath Project in 2003 with the belief that quiet stories of people rebuilding their lives after war or other conflicts have a vital role to play in how the international community understands the effects of armed conflicts on populations.

The deadline for applications is November 11, 2013, with the winner to be announced in mid-December. In addition to the grant, The Aftermath Project will also recognize four finalists, and their work will be published alongside the winners in a book, War is Only Half the Story: Vol 8.

Recent Aftermath Project grant-winners include Stanley Greene, Andrew Lichtenstein and Davide Monteleone.

For more information and to submit an application, visit: http://theaftermathproject.org/2014-Application

Related: Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application (about Lichtenstein’s Aftermath Project Grant application)
Stanley Greene Wins 2013 Aftermath Grant
$20,000 Aftermath Project Grant for 2012 Awarded to Andrew Lichtenstein

December 14th, 2012

Stanley Greene Wins 2013 Aftermath Grant

Stanley Greene has won the 2013 Aftermath Grant for his proposal to create a new project, “The Rise of Islam in the Caucasus,” The Aftermath Project organization announced today. The Aftermath Grant, worth $20,000 in 2013, supports photographers whose work addresses the legacy of conflict.

In making the announcement, The Aftermath Project noted that Greene is the first “conflict photographer,” as Greene is widely known, to win an Aftermath Project grant. Greene is a member of the photographer collective NOOR Images.

Finalists for the grant include Gwenn Dubourthoumieu, who is pursuing an ongoing project about sexual violence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo; Boryana Katsarova, who is working in post-conflict Kosovo, concentrating on the city of Kosovska Mitrovia; Isabel Kiesewetter, who is working on a project that investigates how former military bases in East and West Germany are presently being utilized; and Martino Lombezzi, whose project examines the impact of the border fence between Lebanon and Israel has on local populations.

Greene’s proposal and those of the finalists were selected from 234 entries from around the world.

The first round of judging for the grant was completed by Aftermath Project Founder Sara Terry and Aperture editor Denise Wolff. Terry and photographers Nina Berman and Eros Hoagland selected the winner and finalists.

The 2013 Aftermath Project grant is supported by The Foundation to Promote Open Society.

Related: Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application
$20,000 Aftermath Project Grant for 2012 Awarded to Andrew Lichtenstein
Look3 Report: Stanley Greene on Luck, Film and Supporting Young Photographers
Eros Hoagland Wins $20K Grant for Conflict Photographers

December 14th, 2012

Open Society Announces 2012 Audience Engagement Grant Winners

The Open Society Foundations (OSF) has announced the winners of its 2012 Audience Engagement Grants. The annual grants, which vary in dollar amounts, support documentary projects that propose to go beyond using photography to raise awareness of issues, and “take a more direct role in making change happen.” Each photographer partners with an organization to present the work to new audiences and engagement them in effecting political or social change. For the first time in the history of the grant, all the projects are located in the United States.

The 2012 winners are:

Emily Schiffer, in partnership with the Center for Urban Transformation and Magnum Foundation:
“See Potential” (Chicago, Illinois)
“See Potential,” profiled in PDN’s Community issue (see “Helping Communities Speak for Themselves: See Potential”) uses banners created using documentary photographs captured in South Side neighborhoods to promote four urban revitalization projects in the Englewood and Bronzeville neighborhoods. Neighbors are asked to show their support for the projects via text message.

Robin Bowman, in partnership with The American Teenager Project: “The American Teenager Project” (Richmond, California)
Robin Bowman will work with local arts organizations, high schools, and advocacy groups in Richmond, California—such as Community Leaders Organizing Undocumented Dreamers (CLOUD) to create an exhibition, curriculum and storytelling workshops, and a program to train youth and teachers to be ambassadors for the program who will stimulate youth engagement on civil and human rights issues.

Joseph Rodriguez, in partnership with New America Media: “Re-entry Stories” (Richmond and San Jose, California)
Joseph Rodriguez will train journalism students and youth reporters fro Santa Clara University and the University of California, Berkeley, as well as reporters from New America Media’s youth media hubs to sensitively and accurately document the stories of people re-entering society after incarceration and create multimedia presentations. Their work will be featured alongside Rodriguez’s “Re-entry in Los Angeles” and shown at forums to strengthen advocacy for criminal justice reforms in California.

Jon Lowenstein, in partnership with Trans-Border Institute: “Escondido en Escondido” (Escondido, California)
Jon Lowenstein will provide faith leaders and religious youth groups in Escondido, California, with tools and training to document and address immigration issues and promote community integration. The resulting images will be combined with Lowenstein’s “Shadow Lives USA” and distributed in Escondido as a newsprint handout; additional content will be available to readers using an augmented reality browser, Junaio.

The winning proposals were selected this year by Claudine Brown (former Director of the Arts and Culture Program, Nathan Cummings Foundation and currently Assistant Secretary for Education and Access, Smithsonian Institution); Stephen Ferry (photographer and past Audience Engagement Grant recipient); and Wendy Levy (co-founder, Sparkwise and Senior Strategist, Tomorrow Partners). Fred Ritchin (Professor, Photography & Imaging, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University).

Related Articles:

Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Jon Lowenstein’s Guggenheim Fellowship

AmericanPoverty.org: Addressing America’s Invisible Problem (founded by Steve Liss and Jon Lowenstein)

Helping Communities Speak for Themselves: See Potential

November 19th, 2010

Open Society Announces 2010 Audience Engagement Grant Winners

The Open Society Documentary Photography Project yesterday announced the winners of this year’s Audience Engagement Grants. Founded in 2005 with the name “the Distribution Grant,” the grant seeks to engage communities and decision makers in human rights and social justice issues. Each year, five to eight grants ranging from $5,000 to $30,000 are awarded to photographers who have partnered with individuals or organizations to disseminate their finished photography projects to the public.

This year,  eight grantees were selected:

Andrew Agaba will partner with Africa Leadership Institute (www.aflia.org) on KALISOLISO: The People are Watching, a newspaper supplement, poster campaign, touring exhibition, and blog designed to prevent pre- and post-election violence in Uganda in the February 2011 general elections.

Alit Ambara will partner with Institut Sejarah Sosial Indonesia (ISSI) to present photographs of the victims of the 1965–66 violence in an interactive, multimedia teaching module to be used in Indonesian high school history classes.

Donna De Cesare will partner with Universidad Centroamericana in San Salvador and the The Mesoamerica Center in Antiqua, Guatemala, to combine photography, theater, and skills-based media workshops for youth to address the complex ways that gang violence and migration impact the human rights of young people in Central America.

Kunda Dixit will partner with Madan Puraskar Pustakalaya, the principal archive of books in the Nepali language, to produce Shanti Sangralaya, an educational curriculum and permanent exhibition of photographs, texts, maps, and graphics about the 1996–2006 insurgency in Nepal.

Stephen Ferry will partner with Consejo de Redación in Bogota to create Violentología: Un manual del conflicto colombiano, a visual resource that will be distributed to journalists, editors, and archivists to to instruct and encourage the photographic coverage of Colombia’s human rights crisis.

FIERCE, a membership-based organization in New York City, will partner with Marvin Taylor on Queer Pier: 40 Years, an exhibition and community archiving project that will serve as a tool for FIERCE’s ongoing grassroots organizing and leadership development programs for LGBTQ youth of color in New York City.

Lorena Ros will partner with La Fundación Vicki Bernadet in Barcelona to use Unspoken—a book and multimedia project on adult survivors of child sexual abuse—to create an experiential workshop designed to raise awareness and reach out to women survivors in the Spanish prison system.

Jean-Marie Simon will partner with Oficina de Derechos Humanos del Arzobispado de Guatemala and Estudio A2 (www.a2foto.com) to create a newspaper supplement and a multi-lingual DVD based on her book Guatemala: Eternal Spring, Eternal Tyranny, which documents the height of Guatemala’s civil war in the 1980s.

Information on the grants and application guidelines can be found on the Soros Foundation web site.