February 25th, 2013

Obituary: Sports and Portrait Photographer Ozzie Sweet, 94

Ozzie Sweet, whose photographs have appeared on approximately 1,800 magazine covers, died on Wednesday, February 20, according to an obituary in The New York Times. He was 94 years old.

Sweet started taking photographs after joining the Air Force at the start of World War II, and his “war-time” images frequently landed on the cover of Newsweek—despite the fact that some of them were staged. A 2001 interview with SeacoastOnline noted that Sweet “hate[s] to use the word ‘faked,’” when describing his images and instead said that his shots are “carefully planned and staged.”

After the war, the self-described “photo illustrator” photographed a number of notable subjects including Albert Einstein, Grace Kelly, Joe DiMaggio, John Wayne, Mickey Mantle and Ernest Hemingway, for publications like TIME, Sport, Saturday Evening Post, Ebony, Cosmopolitan, Sports Illustrated and Look. He later became known for his sports photography and co-authored two books on baseball: Mickey Mantle: The Yankee Years: The Classic Photography of Ozzie Sweet and The Boys of Spring. In 2005 he won a Lucie Award for Outstanding Achievement in Sports Photography.

Read his full obituary at www.nytimes.com.

January 23rd, 2013

Obituary: Architectural Photographer Philip Beaurline, 59

Philip Beaurline, an architectural photographer based in Charlottesville, Virginia, died January 18 from complications from the flu. He was 59, his obituary in the Charlottesville Daily Progress reports.

Born in Davenport, Iowa, Beaurline graduated from Grinnell College. He held a variety of jobs –as carpenter, blacksmith and bricklayer, among other occupations–before he took his first photography assignment in 1987, shooting for a high school friend who created custom millwork for architects and builders. A self-taught photographer, Beaurline began shooting for his friend’s architectural clients, and his career was launched. He opened Beaurline Photography in Charlottesville, and was a long-time member of the Central Virginia chapter of the American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP).

His images of architecture in Oaxaca, Mexico, were the subject of a solo exhibition at the Virginia Society of the American Institutes of Architects in Richmond in 1997 and his work was included in the 2003 “Green Architecture” exhibition at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC. He also exhibited his work on the landscapes and historic architecture of Mexico locally.

He is survived by his wife, Marie; his son, Anders; and his sister Erica Mikula of Florida. Information on memorials can be found here.

July 18th, 2012

Horse Racing Photographer Tony Leonard Dies at 89

Tony Leonard, a well-known and respected equestrian photographer, died on July 14, reports the Thoroughbred Times. He was 89 years old. Leonard was considered a pioneer in the field, and is credited with creating the industry standard for conformation photos, which are used to show a horse’s build as well as confirm its breed. Known for documenting what is considered the “Golden Age” of Thoroughbred horse racing, he famously photographed the Triple Crown winner Secretariat over the course of many years.

According to BloodHorse.com, Leonard and his wife of 66 years, Adelle, were “made wards of the state” in 2009 due to medical and financial issues. The photographer later won a May 2010 court case to retain control of his negatives from the state of Kentucky.

He is survived by his wife; his sister and brother-in-law, Mary Lou and Richard Horn; and numerous nieces and nephews as well as grand nieces and nephews.

 

July 10th, 2012

Portrait Photographer Ann Marsden Dies at 55

Portrait and fine-art photographer Ann Marsden died on Sunday, July 9, after a two-year battle with cervical cancer, reports Minnesota Public Radio. She was 55. Marsden was born and raised in St. Paul, and remained in the Twin Cities all her life, where she was a well-known member of the arts scene. Her clients included Fortune 500 companies, like Target and Best Buy, publications and various local theaters, where she made headshots of the actors as well as images of stage performances. Marsden also taught photography and exhibited her fine-art work in the area. According to an obituary in the StarTribune, she is survived by her partner, Ann Prim; her mother, Mary Marsden; her sister, Betsy McConnell; and her brothers, Brian and Craig Marsden.

 

May 7th, 2012

Music Photographer Jim McCrary Dies at 72

Jim McCrary, the former A&M Records staff photographer who shot the cover of Carole King’s Tapestry and other rock-and-roll albums, died on April 29, 2012, “of complications from a chronic nervous system disorder,” the Los Angeles Times reports. He was 72 years old.

McCrary was born and raised in Los Angeles. He was a self-taught photographer who eventually studied at Pasadena City College and Art Center College of Design. McCrary began his career as a staff photographer at various portrait studios and in the photography department of Rockwell International, a manufacturing company involved in the aircraft, space and consumer electronics industries, amongst others.

In 1967 he became the chief photographer for A&M Records and ended up photographing over 300 album covers during the seven years he worked there. Some of his most famous covers include Carole King’s Tapestry, the Carpenters’ Ticket to Ride and Joe Crocker’s Mad Dogs and Englishmen. He also shot related publicity and advertising work for Gram Parsons, the Flying Burrito Brothers, Cat Stevens, Peter Frampton, Herb Alpert and other musicians.

After leaving the label, he owned his own studio in Hollywood until 1990. He then co-founded Pix Inc., a professional camera store in Los Angeles.

McCrary is survived by his son, Jason McCrary, and his brothers Wylee Dale McCrary and Doug McCrary.