March 26th, 2014

Tlumacki, Proctor Win Photojournalist of the Year Honors at BOP

John Tlumacki of The Boston Globe has won Photojournalist of the Year (Large Markets) at the 2013 Best of Photojournalism competition, while Sean Proctor of Michigan’s Midland Daily News has won Photojournalist of the Year (Small Markets).

The National Press Photographers’ Association, which sponsors the competition, announced the complete results on March 24.

Tlumacki won largely on the strength of his coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings in April, 2013. He was at the scene when the bombs exploded. “While others ran away,” NPPA said, “Tlumacki ran toward the scene.”

He spent months documenting the recovery of victims he photographed at the scene.

Proctor, meanwhile, is relatively new to photojournalism, having graduated from Central Michigan University in 2011. He held internships before joining the Midland Daily News just over a year ago, according to NPPA.

In other categories, Patrick Smith won Sports Photojournalist of the Year for the second year in a row. Last month, Smith was named 2014 POYi Sports Photographer of the Year by the Pictures of the Year International Competition.

Jim Gehrz of the Minneapolis Star Tribune won the Cliff Edom “New America” Award for a story about the oil boom in North Dakota and its impact on traditional life there.

Rick Loomis of the Los Angeles Times won the Returning Veterans Coming Home award.

NPPA has posted a complete list of winners on its web site. (Scroll way down.)

Judges for BOP’s still photography competition were photojournalists Cheryl Diaz Meyer and Bill Luster; Kenneth Irby of The Poynter Institute, and NPPA president Mark Dolan. The judging took place at Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication.

February 24th, 2014

White House Shuts Out Photographers Again. So Now What?

No photographers allowed: White House released this photo of President Obama's meeting with the Dalai Lama on February 21.

The White House released this photo of President Obama and the Dalai Lama on Feb. 21, after barring press photographers from the meeting.

Now that it is evident that the White House is deaf to complaints from photographers and their employers about being shut out of some of President Obama’s official meetings, the question is, What can the media do about it?

On Friday, the White House  closed a meeting between the President and the Dalai Lama, and then angered photographers, their employers, and photo trade groups by by releasing an official photo on Twitter by White House photographer Pete Souza.

Reuters and the Associated Press (AP) refused to distribute the official photo, according to a report by the National Press Photographers Association.

The White House News Photographers Association (WHNPA) issued a statement urging other news organizations not to publish the photo, describing it as “a visual press release of a news worthy event.”

WHNPA also said in their statement, “We are disappointed the White House has reverted to their old strategy of announcing a closed press event and then later releasing their own photo.”

Last November, more than three dozen news organizations signed a joint letter protesting limits on photographers’ access to some of Obama’s official meetings.

A few weeks later, The New York Times published an op-ed piece by AP director of photography Santiago Lyon, who called the White House handout photos “propaganda.”

Around the same time, journalists confronted White House press secretary Jay Carney at a White House press briefing about the issue. Carney told the journalists in so many words that The White House no longer needs photographers like it once did, because it can distribute its own pictures directly to the public on the internet.

“You don’t have to buy that newspaper or subscribe to that wire service to see that photograph,” Carney said at the time.

Nevertheless, he pledged “to work with the press and with the photographers to try to address some of their concerns.” About a week later, on December 17, he met with representatives of the National Press Photographers Association (NPPA), the WHNPA, and other media organizations.

Afterwards, NPPA general counsel Mickey Osterreicher said in a report published by NPPA, “We remain cautiously optimistic that the White House will follow through on its earlier commitment to transparency.”

That was then. On Friday, after photographers were shut out of Obama’s meeting with the Dalai Lama, White House News Photographers Association president Ron Sachs said in another NPPA report, “I think the White House grand strategy is to talk us to death and do nothing.”

Osterreicher tells PDN, “We (media groups) should be having a meeting soon” to discuss what to do next.

Undoubtedly they’ll be looking for new angles of diplomacy or attack (or both) to regain the access that White House press corps photographers once enjoyed. In the meantime, we ask PDN readers: What would you advise media organizations and photographers covering the White House to do now?

Related:

Media Protests White House Limits on Photographers
White House Press Secretary to Photographers: We Respect You, But We Don’t Need You
AP Photo Chief Appeals to Public About White House Access. Will It Help?

February 20th, 2014

PDN Video: A Photographer’s Guide to the First Amendment and Dealing with Police Intimidation

Since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, news photographers have been subject to police intimidation and arrest, as if photography is a crime. But federal law protects photography and photographers, as Mickey Osterreicher, general counsel to the National Press Photographers Association, explains in this video. The challenge for photographers is knowing how to assert your rights in tense situations, without getting arrested. Osterreicher offers practical tips for staying out of trouble while getting the pictures you need. And for photographers unfortunate enough to get arrested, he suggests places to call for legal help.

Related:

Police Intimidation Watch: New Haven Police Sued for Arresting Photographer, Erasing iPhone Video

Police Intimidation Watch: Detroit Police Apologize After Video Shows Them Violating Photographer’s Rights

Police Intimidation Watch: Cop Charged with Lying About a Photographer’s Arrest

August 26th, 2013

Reuters Phasing Out Use of Freelance Sports Photographers in North America

Reuters is phasing out its use of contract freelance sports photographers in North America and will instead rely on USA Today Sports Images, a wire service, for sideline coverage of major professional sports and some college games. “I can confirm that we are expanding our ongoing relationship with USA Today Sports and will be adding a subset of their North American Sports photography to our file,” a Reuters spokesperson told PDN.

NPPA first reported this change at Reuters on Friday. The NPPA report quotes an unnamed source at Sports Illustrated and a freelance photographer in Toronto, Jon Blacker. Blacker told NPPA that he spoke with Peter Jones, the North American Sports Photo Editor at Thomson Reuters on Friday morning, as he was making calls to inform their freelance sports photographers of the change. “He said it was purely a business decision, and that their business plan calls for using the money that Reuters saves on covering sports to re-invest in photo covering more news,” Blacker said.

USATSI is owned by Gannett, which purchased the company in August 2011.

(via NPPA)

June 10th, 2013

PDN Video Pick: Open Lanes

In his short video “Open Lanes,” photographer Stephen M. Keller captures an honest, revealing portrait of a bowling alley owner struggling to keep his business alive. The video, with audio and visuals that are equally compelling, was one of several noteworthy projects by participants at the 2013 NPPA Multimedia Immersion workshop at Syracuse University last month. The five-day workshop was a hands-on course in multimedia story telling and production. Participants were given names of subjects and contact information, then turned loose to figure out the subject’s story, and gather the audio and video required to tell it. Coaches with experience in multimedia production helped the workshop participants shape and edit their stories. (PDN editor David Walker participated in the workshop at the invitation of organizers).

 

Stephen Keller – Open Lanes – NPPA Immersion 2013 from Multimedia Immersion on Vimeo.

PDN: What was the assignment you got at the workshop?
Stephen Keller: It wasn’t detailed at all. It just said, Solvay Recreation Alleys and it gave a phone number. I called and talked to the [owner] for 20 or 30 minutes about the bowling alley, and what was going on with it. He seemed like a good guy who loved bowling, and the bowling industry, but he was also in tough times and I thought [the bowling alley] might be in some financial trouble. But he was a normal guy who you want to see succeed.

PDN: How in-depth was your pre-production interview?
SK: I was trying to get as much information as I could, to get an idea where I wanted to go with the story. I wanted to have idea what I might want to look for, what I might want to shoot, what I might want to ask in the interview. I like to preview [stories], to see if they will be worthwhile. It’s also a way to build rapport and get [the subject] familiar with me, even before the camera is there.

PDN: Were you concerned he might tell you the whole story in the pre-production interview, and then be less enthusiastic about telling it on tape because he’d already told you his story?
SK: Not really, because he was a guy who seemed like he liked to talk. I think pre-production interviews are a good thing. I usually do the regular [recorded] interview after all the footage is shot. So I’m familiar with the subject and the story, and I’m going to ask the same questions multiple times in different parts of the interview so I get it clean.

PDN: Did you have a clear idea of the story narrative in your head before you got there, and if so, what was it?
SK: A little bit–it was kind of like an economy story. I wanted to go in that direction because everyone can kind of relate to that. When I got there, it looked pretty much the way I imagined, but I was wondering: how do I shoot an empty bowling alley? That’s boring, so how do I make it visually interesting?

During the pre-production interview I got information about when there were likely to be customers, but when I arrived there was just nobody there. For the three hours that I was there, there has nothing happening, so I went back the next day to [film] some actual customers. I ended up shooting with people there, and without people there, and I tried to get the same angles, somewhat. I should have put marks on the floor to put the tripod in the same spot, to make jump cuts between those shots [with and without people]. I [also] showed that the clientele is [disappearing] by filming the senior citizens who bowl there.

PDN: Did you do the interview after all the shooting was finished?
SK: We did the interview at the end of the first day [after] nobody came in. We were in the same room together for three or four hours, just us. [Your subject] kind of gets familiar with the camera that way.

PDN: What were the biggest challenges you had?
SK: With this piece, because I’m more experienced shooter, I wanted to focus on the parts of my skill set that aren’t the best. My main thing was to focus on getting best interview I’ve ever gotten.

PDN: Your subject’s struggle and sense of resignation comes across so well in the interview. How did you get him to let his guard down?
SK: It was just being around each other. It was being up front, and building that rapport. He opened up, and was the kind of guy who wouldn’t hide anything [anyway]. I also noted his responses to the questions, and returned to some of them to get him to elaborate more.
[Workshop coach] Evan [Vucci's] “dumb dog” technique really helped. When the subject finished up a sentence, I would give him the “dumb dog” look and he would keep going, and elaborate further without [my] even having to [ask a follow-up question]. [Editor's note: With the "dumb dog" technique, an interviewer tilts his head and raises his eyebrows inquisitively as soon as the subject finishes responding to a question. The key is to make the gesture without saying a word. The purpose is to prompt the subject to continue talking, and it often leads the subject to give an unguarded response to the question at hand.]

PDN: Was it a challenge to edit the story?
SK:  There were so may great quotes. The hardest part was cutting [them]. As Evan said to me, “You have to kill your babies” [i.e., the quotes that you love the most] to tell a great story about this guy. One thing [the subject] said that didn’t make it into the film was that he was an avid bowler, but he’s had a knee injury and hasn’t been able to bowl for a few years.

(See all the 2013 Multimedia Immersion videos here, and more videos by Keller here)

Related story:
PDN Video Pick: Our Own Little World

May 30th, 2013

PDN Video Pick: Our Own Little World

Photographer Lori Waselchuk‘s three-minute video titled Our Own Little World was one of several noteworthy projects produced by participants at the 2013 NPPA Multimedia Immersion workshop at Syracuse University earlier this month. The five-day workshop, which was attended by a PDN editor David Walker at the invitation of the organizers, started with a crash course in multimedia storytelling and production, and quickly moved on to hands-on training in one-man-band video production. Workshop participants drew assignments out of a hat, then hit the streets to shoot the stories. Back at the Newhouse School of Public Communications, where the workshop was held, coaches helped participants shape and edit their stories.

Lori Waselchuk – Our Own Little World – NPPA Immersion 2013.mov.

We asked Waselchuk to tell us a little about her project, and how she pulled it together.

PDN: What was the assignment you got?
Lori Waselchuk: It said, “Keith (Traub) and Theresa (Daddona-Traub) are making furniture from recycled farm materials” and then it gave the name of their business (Unite Two Design) their address and contact info. It was very brief.

PDN: How did you conceive and construct the story from that?
LW: The workshop helped me walk into the story. Bruce Strong‘s lecture on story telling helped me take the basics–who, what, when, where and why– and develop a story arc that has commonality and universality for an audience. Keith and Theresa’s story came out in the interview. I interviewed Theresa first. She was really open. When I asked, ‘how did you start to make furniture?’, she was able to talk honestly and authentically about their journey.

PDN: Did you do the interviews before you started shooting? How did the interview inform what and how you shot?
LW: As a photographer, I get my visual cues from interviews. That was a natural process for me. I needed to know more about who these people were. As they were telling their story, I was able to figure out the important aspects. Theresa spoke about their journey and lessons learned. Keith was shyer about their journey. Working with the farm materials is what gives him his creative oxygen, so I had him talk about the craft, the artwork. He talked about collecting materials, and building relationships with farmers whose farms are no longer in use. He goes out to farms to collect stuff. So I asked if we could go out on one of his scavenging hunts. He made it happen the second day. I drove to Keith and Theresa’s place half an hour before they arrived so I could get the sunrise shots. I wanted to show the texture around their place in early morning light. Keith rolled in, then we went out to the farm, collected, then I spent the rest of the day shooting them at work.

PDN: Why was texture around their place important? What did it contribute to the story?
LW: it was a phenomenal space visually, so I needed to capitalize on that. I wanted to get the quietness, the peacefulness of the place. it’s a bit of a treasured space for them, so I wanted to be able to describe that color and texture.

PDN: What was the biggest challenge you had producing this story?
LW: Shooting felt quite natural. I felt good about photography. It was the sound that I would not have known how to handle. The challenge is to creature texture in editing between sound and visuals. McKenna Ewen (one of the workshop coaches) helped me create those complex mixtures of sound and visuals in the editing. The way he layers those things is something I would never have been able to do. The biggest challenging for me is the editing.

PDN: What were the biggest lessons you learned, about story telling or production?
LW: I loved the intensity of the workshop. It made me feel the way I used to when I was a photographer for a daily newspaper. I’m super excited about the demands of video, and the learning curve ahead. I needed that inspiration.

(Other videos from the workshop are posted on Vimeo. Search “NPPA immersion 2013″)

April 24th, 2013

Sangosti, Weatherwax Win BOP Photojournalist of the Year Honors

RJ Sangosti of The Denver Post and David Weatherwax of The Herald in Jasper, Indiana were named Photojournalists of the Year in the Best of Photojournalism (BOP) competition, the National Press Photographers Association (NPPA) has announced.

There are two winners because NPPA recognizes a winner for both larger and smaller markets. Sangosti won in the larger market division. Runners up were Damon Winter and Tyler Hicks, both of The New York Times.

Weatherwax won the Photojournalist of the Year title for the smaller market division for the second year in a row. (The Herald has a circulation of 11,300). Runners up this year were Tom Kelly IV (Daily Local News, Westchester, PA) and Gerry Melendez (The State, Columbia, South Carolina).

Patrick Smith, a freelancer for Getty Images, won the Sports Photojournalist of the Year title. Runners-up were Quinn Rooney (Getty Images) and Bill Frakes (Sports Illustrated).

Aaron Huey, shooting for National Geographic Magazine, is the winner of Cliff Edom’s “New America Award” for his photographic essay, “In The Shadow Of Wounded Knee.”

In the competition’s editing division, Mark Edelson of The Palm Beach Post won Newspaper Picture Editor of the Year, and Jamie Wellford of Newsweek was named Magazine Picture Editor of the Year.

Judges for the BOP still photo competition were photographers Amy Sancetta of the Associated Press and Jack Gruber of USA Today; and Boyzell Hosey, the director of photography and multimedia for the St. Petersburg Times. More details about the still photo competition are posted on the NPPA site at this link.

Judges for the BOP photo editing awards were picture editor Molly Roberts of Smithsonian magazine, photographer Matt Moyer, and Bert Fox, photography director of The Charlotte Observer. More information about the photo editing awards are posted on the NPPA site at this link.

Related:
Paolo Pellegrin Named POYi Freelance Photographer of the Year
Paul Hansen Wins POYi Newspaper Photographer of the Year

April 18th, 2013

Man Infringes Copyright to Profit from Boston Bombing

Intent on making a quick buck from the Boston Marathon bombing, a self-publisher allegedly offered an e-book full of stolen news photos for sale on Amazon.com, titled “The Boston Bombings First Photos.”

The NPPA reported yesterday that the book, published by a man identified as Steve Goldstein, included more than 60 images used without permission from The Associated Press, Getty Images and The New York Times. Goldstein was charging $7.99 per download.

Amazon has removed the book, apparently in response to Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) take-down notices from copyright holders.

According to the NPPA report, a New York Times attorney sent a cease-and-desist letter to Goldstein. In his response, Goldstein wrote, “We will stop using the photos that you mention. Sorry for the use without permission.”

For more details, see the NPPA report.

April 15th, 2013

APA, NPPA Join Copyright Suit Against Google

American Photographic Artists (APA) and the National Press Photographers Association (NPPA) announced today that they are joining an ongoing class action lawsuit against Google, alleging that the Google Books Search program is a violation of the copyrights of photographers and other visual artists.

Under the Google Books Search program, Google has been working with several libraries to scan books and periodicals and make the content available through search engine results. But a group of plaintiffs–including photographers and photo trade associations–filed a class action lawsuit in 2010 to stop Google from copying, scanning or displaying copyrighted photos and other visuals in printed publications without permission.

“I feel it is the NPPA’s responsibility to protect that principle of ownership, and not allow companies like Google to infringe upon our rights uncontested,” NPPA president Mike Borland said in a statement issued today by NPPA.

The lawsuit was spearheaded by American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP). Other lead plaintiffs include the Graphic Artists Guild, Picture Archive Council of America (PACA), Professional Photographers of America (PPA), the North American Nature Photography Association (NANPA), and a number of individual photographers.

ASMP said when it filed the lawsuit that the goal is to make sure photographers are “fairly and reasonably compensated” when their works are distributed through Google search results.

In joining the lawsuit, APA national president Theresa Raffetto said in a prepared statement: “Holding Google Books responsible for their flagrant copyright infringement is something APA has been working on and we’re pleased to continue this fight in conjunction with the other plaintiffs.”

April 10th, 2013

Suspect Arrested in Shooting of Oakland Photographer

A suspect has been charged with murder in the killing of a freelance photographer who was shot April 6 while driving home in Oakland, California, the Oakland Tribune reports. Lionel Fluker, a former contributor to the Oakland Tribune, was killed by a stray bullet fired in a fist fight that escalated into a gun fight, according to the Alamada Country District Attorney’s office. The suspect, who was arraigned April 9, was also charged with possession of a gun by a felon, carrying a concealed weapon and carrying a loaded firearm.

A memorial service for Fluker will be held on April 13, the NPPA reports. (Details on location is available on the NPPA site.)

As PDN Pulse recently noted, several photographers and TV reporters have been robbed at gunpoint in Oakland this year.

Related article
Photojournalists Stripped of Gear at Gunpoint in Oakland