June 5th, 2012

Nan Goldin Awarded the Edward MacDowell Medal

Nan Goldin

Nan Goldin. Photo courtesy of The MacDowell Colony.

The MacDowell Colony, a non-profit artist residency program in New Hampshire, has named Nan Goldin as the 2012 Edward MacDowell Medal recipient.

Each year The MacDowell Colony honors “an individual artist who has made outstanding contribution to his/her field.” Past winners include Robert Frank, Edward Hopper, Joan Didion, Thornton Wilder and I.M. Pei. On August 12, 2012, Goldin will receive the prestigious award.

Goldin, 58, is best known for her gritty self-portraits and documentary photographs of fringe subcultures in New York City during the Seventies and Eighties. The images often depicted drug use, violence, domestic abuse and sexual situations, and are collectively known as “The Ballad of Sexual Dependency.” Goldin has been the subject of two major exhibitions, one at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1996 and the other at the Centre Pompidou in 2001.

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May 9th, 2012

Jeff Wall Photograph Fetches Artist Record $3.6 Million at Auction

"Dead Troops Talk (A vision after an ambush of a Red Army patrol, near Moqor, Afghanistan, winter 1986," © Jeff Wall.

A 1992 photograph by Jeff Wall sold for $3,666,500 yesterday evening during a Post-War and Contemporary art auction at Christie’s in New York City. The previous record sale for a work by Jeff Wall was $1.1 million.

The work “Dead Troops Talk (A vision after an ambush of a Red Army patrol, near Moqor, Afghanistan, winter 1986″ depicts a grisly scene in which Soviet Red Army soldiers killed by the Afghan mujahideen have come back to life and are conversing with one another.

The photograph, framed in a light box, was the first in an edition of two, with one artist’s print. The photograph has been in the collection of David and Geraldine Pincus, who acquired it from Marian Goodman Gallery in New York. The Pincus’s substantial collection formed a major part of the sale, which set a record for a Post-War and Contemporary art sale at $388.5 million, according to Christie’s.

The high lot in the sale was Mark Rothko’s “Orange, Red, Yellow,” which sold for $86.9 million, another record for a work from the Post-War period.

Three other photographs were included in the sale. A Richard Prince work that appropriated a Marlboro advertisement, “Untitled (Cowboys),” sold for $602,500. Cindy Sherman’s “Untitled #122″ sold for $206,500. And Nan Goldin’s “Ballad Triptych” sold for $218,500.

Related: Eggleston’s First-Ever Large Pigment Prints Earn 5.9 Million at Auction