April 10th, 2014

11 Photographers Among Winners of 2014 Guggenheim Fellowships

The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation announced the recipients of their 2014 fellowships today. Eleven photographers are among the 178 recipients.

They are (links direct to their bios and image galleries on the Guggenheim site):

Robert Dawson
LaToya Frazier
Jason Fulford
Phyllis Galembo
Gregory Halpern
Brenda Kenneally
Andrew Moore
Lori Nix
Matthew Pillsbury
Mark Ruwedel
Rachel Sussman

Guggenheim Fellows receive a grant to pursue a project; the Foundation does not disclose the amount of money they receive.

Founded in 1922, the prestigious Fellowship program is intended to “add to the educational, literary, artistic, and scientific power of this country, and also to provide for the cause of better international understanding.” The Fellowship supports individuals in mid-career‚ “who have already demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts.”

Past recipients of Guggenheim Fellowships include photographers Robert Frank, Diane Arbus, Lewis Baltz, Robert Adams, Brian Ulrich, Richard Mosse, Alec Soth, Christian Patterson and Penelope Umbrico.

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PDN Video Pick: LaToya Ruby Frazier at The Whitney Biennial

March 14th, 2012

PDN Video Picks: Sushi’s Source, A Tale Told in Miniatures


The ingenuity and craftsmanship that go into photographer Lori Nix‘s images of carefully crafted dioramas and miniature models always elicit a smile, even when the subject is dark or ominous. This past fall, Nix and her partner and collaborator Kathleen Gerber were asked by producer and writer Joe Sabia to help make a video on a serious topic:  the overfishing of the world’s oceans. The idea was to inspire people to consider this environmental issue by explaining where sushi comes from.

Directed by Vincent Peone, “The Story of Sushi” begins in a sushi bar then moves to a fishing trawler to a warehouse and back to a restaurant. Each location is actually one of Nix and Gerber’s sets. It’s at once realistic and playful, thanks to all the props and models, including toy sharks and billowing fog –all sourced, assembled or handcrafted by Nix and Gerber.
Gerber describes the seven-month project on the Lori Nix blog.

“The Story of Sushi” can be viewed on Vimeo.