August 8th, 2012

At Least 70 Journalists Killed on the Job in 2012

At least 70 journalists and media workers were killed while covering the news  between January and June of this year; 15 of them died in Syria alone, according to a report released today by the International News Safety Institute (INSI) and conducted by the Cardiff School of Journalism. The number may be higher, as INSI reports that an additional 30 media workers were killed, but the organization was unable to confirm that their deaths were related to their work. By comparison, 56 journalists died on the job in the first seven months of last year, and a total of 124 died in the whole of 2011.

INSI, a coalition of new organizations, journalist support groups and individuals, is a non-profit dedicated to promoting the safety and security of journalists around the world.

INSI reports on all issues of safety for journalists, and not only the targeting of journalists by enemies of a free press. However, INSI Director Rodney Pinder says of today’s report, “Journalists are more than ever in the cross-hairs of the enemies of freedom.” Most of the journalists killed this year were shot or bombed. “Despite some encouraging international political moves to halt the murder, the gun and the bomb remain the favored method of censorship in far too many countries.”

INSI also notes that of the more than 1,000 journalists and media workers killed on the job in the past decade, “The great majority were born and raised in the land where they were killed. Foreign correspondents are the high profile casualties, but most victims are local.”

The full report is available on the INSI web site, www.newssafety.org.

(Via the Guardian and Committee to Protect Journalists.)

Related articles:

Your Cellphone is Not Your Friend and Other Security Tips for Conflict Zones

Columbia J-School to Offer Safety Course for Journalists

Were Journalists in Homs Targeted for Bombing?

March 23rd, 2011

Oslo Photo Festival: On Photojournalism and Survival

The 5th annual Oslo Photo Festival, which took place from March 16 to 20 in Norway’s capital, hosted talks by photojournalists and documentary photographers Carolyn Drake, Stephanie Sinclair, Pieter Ten Hoopen, Thomas Lekfeldt, Andrea Star Reese, Justyna Mielnikiewicz and Eugene Richards. Speakers offered insights into how they win the trust of subjects, what it takes to develop a strong personal project, and advice on surviving under difficult conditions and in an increasingly demanding profession.

Many photographers and photo students who attended sought advice on what it takes to be a successful photojournalist. Others, like festival attendee Chris Harrison, came to meet colleagues from the Norwegian photo community. “We all live in our own little worlds most of the time so it’s good to get out socially and chew the fat,” Harrison said. “All in all it’s kind of like getting a vitamin shot—going to these things you realize you aren’t alone and in some ways you’re quite privileged and its good to be reminded how fantastic photography is.”

Here are notes from some of the Festival’s presentations.

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