February 8th, 2016

Instagram Now Supports Multiple Accounts from a Single Login

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Managing multiple Instagram accounts is no longer a major hassle. The service announced today that it would allow users to access up to five different accounts from a single login.

To enable account switching, you’ll need to download the latest version of Instagram’s mobile app (v. 7.15), which is live in both the Android and Apple apps stores.

 To add multiple Instagram accounts:

  1. Go to your profile and tap or in the top right
  2. Scroll down and tap Add Account
  3. Enter the username and password of the account you’d like to add

To switch between accounts you’ve added:

  1. Go to your profile
  2. Tap your username at the top of the screen
  3. Tap the account you’d like to switch to

You will receive push notifications from any account that has the function enabled.

Read More:

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February 5th, 2016

Great Weekend Reads in Photography and Filmmaking

Jon Westra | Flickr

Jon Westra | Flickr

 

“People say that life is the thing, but I prefer reading.” ― Logan Pearsall Smith

How Photography Became a Modern ArtChristies

10 Myths About the Rule of ThirdsIPox Studios

How the NY Times Is Using Old Images to Tell Stories It MissedPoynter

Shooting and Editing a Huge Indian Wedding Using Just an iPhone – Rangefinder

The FAA’s Drone Registry Is a Privacy NightmareEngadget

11 Reasons Why Virtual Reality Still Stinks Mashable

Famed War Photographer Don McCullin on Risk, War & GuiltGlobe & Mail

One of the Most Radical, Daring Photo Expositions Ever Feature Shoot

The Putin of Chechnya’s Flair for InstagramNew Yorker

Craft Guild Nominations vs. the OscarsVariety

Want more links? Check out past Weekend Reads here.

January 4th, 2016

Photographer Sues Richard Prince Over Instagram Rip-offs… At Last

"Rastafarian Smoking a Joint" ©Donald Graham

“Rastafarian Smoking a Joint” ©Donald Graham

Photographer Donald Graham has sued appropriation artist Richard Prince and his gallerist Lawrence Gagosian for copyright infringement of a photo that appeared without Graham’s authorization on Instagram, and then in a gallery exhibition of Prince’s appropriation work.

Prince drew public complaints and vitriol last year for unauthorized reproduction, display and sale of a series of 67 x 55-inch inkjet prints of Instagram “screen saves” of images by other artists and photographers. But Graham is the first to sue.

The Los Angeles-based photographer filed suit in federal court in New York on December 30, alleging unauthorized use of a 1996 photograph (shown here) of a Rastafarian man lighting a joint. Graham alleges in his claim that a third party posted his photograph on Instagram without permission, and that Prince copied and enlarged that unauthorized photo and displayed it as part of his 2014 “New Portraits” exhibition.

Graham’s complaint calls Prince out for “his blatant disregard for copyright law” and goes on to say that “Mr. Prince consistently and repeatedly has incorporated others’ works” into his own works, without permission, credit or compensation. (more…)

December 29th, 2015

Find Your Most-Liked Instagram Photos of the Year [Update: Maybe Not]

Screen Shot 2015-12-29 at 10.02.15 AM

[Update: A few readers have pointed out that the site is returning spam links or attempting to download malware. We didn’t experience any malware warnings on our Mac and didn’t find the site in BadWare clearing house–though it’s very new and may not yet be listed. We also sent it through VirusTotal, a site that runs URL scans through a number of different malware detectors from a variety of services. Their results found only one service returning a malware warning and over 25 claiming it was clean. Either way, we’ve sent the site to a few malware researchers to learn more. If you’re dying to know your top Instagram posts, maybe you do have to do it the old fashion way…. ]

As the year winds down, thoughts naturally turn to making lists and meticulously cataloging the year that was.

Avid Instagrammers could take the time to scroll through a year’s worth of posts, but this being the 21st Century, far better to let algorithms do it for you. A new site — 2015bestnine — digs through your year in posts and generates a collage of your nine most-liked images.

You simply enter in your Instagram user name and wait for the results (while you wait, you can peruse the site’s interesting grammatical choices). The images will be ordered by rank, with your most-liked appearing in the upper left hand corner.

Here’s an example of what it looks like from Instagram’s most followed personality.

Screen Shot 2015-12-29 at 10.02.31 AM

Read More:

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How Photographers With Huge Followings Grew Their Social Networks

This Is the Most Liked Photo on Instagram

December 22nd, 2015

PDN Pulse: Top Photo News Stories of 2015

From photographer contract restrictions to instagram apps, and from copyright infringements to a changing code of ethics, this year’s list of the most-read articles on PDNPulse capture some of the highs and lows of the photography business this year.

A photo posted by SuicideGirls ? (@suicidegirls) on

1“SuicideGirls” Deliver Cleverest Response to Richard Prince’s Instagram Appropriation 

The band was cheered for their response to artist Richard Price’s appropriation of their images from Instagram. The brand’s founder, Missy Suicide (also known as Selena Mooney) announced the band would sell for $90 the same images Price and his gallery, Gagosian, are alleged to have copied and then sold for $90,000. Price sold the images at the Frieze Art Fair in New York and at Gagosian’s Beverly Hills gallery.

2 & 3– Photographer Calls Out Taylor Swift for Apple Hypocrisy and Swift Agrees to Change Contract 

Taylor Swift headlines raked in clicks all across the internet this year, but it was the fine print in her contract with freelance concert photographers that drew readers to PDN. In late June, the singer’s management company, Firefly Entertainment, Inc., released a contract that limited photographers from running their photographs more than once, even for news purposes. In July, the management company revised the contract, removing and revising some of elements that photographers had found objectionable.

4– Controversial World Press Photo Winner Under New Scrutiny Today

In March, questions about the authenticity of photographer Giovanni Trolio’s series, “The Dark Heart of the Europe,” winner of a 1st prize in the 2015 World Press Photo competition, generated buzz when another photographer claimed that the images may have been staged. Ultimately, World Press Photo withdrew the award on the grounds that the story was not captioned in compliance with the entry rules. In November, World Press announced that the 2016 World Press Photo contest will be carried out with a new code of ethics to reflect an effort at reform and transparency in the wake of the scandal.

5– How to Kill Restrictive Concert Photography Contracts

In the wake of the backlash against Taylor Swift’s management company for its contract restricting photographers’ image usage (see 2 & 3), Norwegian photographer Jarle Moe wrote a blog post posing a solution: Photographers could end restrictive contracts if they identified themselves  “journalists,” not “concert photographers.”

6– If You’re Using This Instagram App, Delete It 

When the popular Instagram app InstaAgent was reported to be storing Instagram users’ passwords and usernames and sending them in plain text to a remote server, PDN encouraged readers using the app to delete it.

7– Ilford Offers Glimpse into the Mind of the 21st Century Film Photographer

Think film is dead? Black-and-white film supplier Ilford released findings from a study of of film-users showing that film is still a viable – and resurging – medium in the photography world. The company surveyed “thousands” of film users across 70 countries to understand who uses film and why. Notable in the findings was that 30 percent of respondents were under the age of 35, and that 60 percent of them said they had picked up film photography over the past five years.

8How Photographers With Huge Followings Grew Their Social Networks

October’s PhotoPlus Expo #Trending panel consisted of four photographers—Sue Bryce, Vincent Laforet, Jeremy Cowart and Chase Jarvis—with sizable social media followings. The panelists offered their advice, suggestions and experiences on how photographers can build and maintain their social network, such as making posts that are honest, positive, and have something of value to share with the world.

9NYT Mag Hires Male Photographer for Sexism in Hollywood Cover Story

In November, The New York Times Magazine ran a cover story discussing the challenges women face working in the male-dominated world of Hollywood. However, to shoot the cover, which featured portraits of 60 female actors, directors and executives, The New York Times Magazine hired a male photographer.  That irony inspired in an outpouring of social media posts from women photographers expressing their disappointment. Director of photography for The New York Times Magazine Kathy Ryan told PDN that women photographers shouldn’t “think that somehow there aren’t opportunities [at the magazine], because I feel very passionately that there are, and that’s important to us: To have women’s points of view, that diversity, that range in our pages is important.”

10 – Why TIME Chose an Amateur Photographer’s Image for Its Cover 

The May 11 issue of TIME Magazine had a cover bearing an image of protests in Baltimore taken by a 26-year-old amateur photographer, Devin Allen, who had only two years of experience under his belt. This marks the third time in the magazine’s history that it has used an amateur’s image on the cover. In explaining the decision to use Allen’s image, TIME deputy director of photography Paul Moakley noted that Allen is a Baltimore native, and, “He was being really thoughtful and was capturing both sides of what was happening.”

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PDN Pulse: Top Gear Stories of 2015
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December 2nd, 2015

Parents Are Naming Their Children After Instagram Filters

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Many photographers take a dim view of Instagram filters. Many parents, evidently, don’t.

According to Baby Center, parents naming their children after Instagram filters is a thing. Names such as Lux, Juno, Reyes, Ludwig, Amaro, Valencia, Willow are trending:

The Instagram-inspired name Lux is up 75 percent on our list of baby boy names, and it’s slightly up on our list of baby girl names too. (Though technically not a filter, the photo-editing tool balances exposure, adds brightness, and makes images pop.)

One newer filter, Ludwig, jumped 42 percent on our boys’ name list. Other popular filter names for boys include Amaro (up 26 percent), Reyes (up 10 percent), Hudson (up 4 percent), and Kelvin (up 3 percent).

For baby girls, the name Juno leaped 30 percent in popularity. (The Juno filter, introduced in 2015, makes outdoor photos especially gorgeous.) Valencia, which gives pictures a soft, warm glow, rose 26 percent on our girls’ name list. Willow gained 13 percent.

Far be it from us to bemoan a parent’s right to choose their child’s name and there are certainly worse baby names floating around out there. And it’s heartening to see that photography is seeping so profoundly into our culture… right?

Read More:

How Many Hashtags Should You Use on Instagram?

Using This Instagram App? Delete It

How Photographers With Huge Followings Grew Their Social Networks

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November 24th, 2015

How Many Hashtags Should You Use on Instagram?

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Three.

That, according to social media analytics firm Locowise, is the optimum number of hashtags an Instagram post should have to earn the most engagement.

Locowise derived that figure by examining over 1,500 active Instagram accounts that posted 135,000+ posts in the 3-month period and had 300+ million followers combined. Of those, nearly 14 percent of all posts had no hashtags, while those with three had the highest level of engagement. However, those with no hashtags had just a slightly lower engagement rate than those with three.

Indeed, Locowise finds engagement rates decline as you tack on additional hashtags above three.

On Twitter, the firm found that tweets with no hashtags outperformed those with hashtags. This despite the fact that we have Twitter to thank for hash-tagging in the first place.

The moral of the story? A hashtag or three will help you attract eyeballs on Instagram, but not Twitter.

Read More:

Using This Instagram App? Delete It

How Photographers With Huge Followings Grew Their Social Networks

This Is the Most Liked Photo on Instagram

November 12th, 2015

If You’re Using This Instagram App, Delete It

InstaAgent is a popular app that helps Instagram users track who’s visiting their Instagram account. It’s also, according to a investigation by a developer at Peppersoft, malware.

Evidently, InstaAgent is storing Instagram users’ passwords and usernames and sending them in plain text to a remote server. As MacRumors Julie Clover reports, the app is “also using the credentials to log into accounts and post unauthorized images. Instagram does not permit third-party apps to upload photos to user accounts.”

Since the revelation, InstaAgent has been pulled from both the iOS and Google Play app stores. If it’s on your mobile device, you should delete it ASAP and change your Instagram password.

Read More:

How Photographers With Huge Followings Grew Their Social Networks

This Is the Most Liked Photo on Instagram

October 7th, 2015

This Is the Most-Liked Photo on Instagram

The first images of Pluto’s surface? A selfie with a world leader? A stunning landscape? A dramatic piece of photojournalism? An adorable cat? Nope. It’s this.

 

A photo posted by Kendall Jenner (@kendalljenner) on

To celebrate Instagram’s five-year anniversary, Time’s Olivia Waxman collected the top five most liked photos.

The Kardashians and relatives take three of the top five spots, while Taylor Swift captures the other two spots.

Draw what conclusions you will.

Beyond our evident obsession with celebrity, Instagram has grown into a formidable social network since its launch five years ago. The service now boasts 400 million users and its global expansion has been impressive. According to the social network, a full 75 percent of its users reside outside of the U.S.

September 10th, 2015

Getty and Instagram Announce Winners of $10K Grants For Underreported Stories

getty-instagram-grant-adriana-Zehbrauskas

An image by Adriana Zehbrauskas, one of the winners of the inaugural Getty Images Instagram Grant, which recognizes photographers using the social media platform to tell underreported stories. Here, a woman holds her daughter before her baptism at Mexico City’s Basílica de Guadalupe.

Getty Images, in partnership with Instagram, have announced three winners of the first annual Getty Images Instagram Grant, which recognizes photographers who’ve used the social media platform to tell underreported stories around the world. The winners, all of whom are experienced professional photographers, have documented communities in Bangladesh, Latin America and Russia. They will each receive $10,000 and mentorship from Getty photojournalists, and their work will be part of an exhibit which opens today at Photoville in Brooklyn, New York.

Brazilian-born photojournalist Adriana Zehbrauskas (@adrianazehbrauskas), who lives in Mexico City and whose clients include The New York Times, Wall Street Journal and The Sunday Times, was recognized for her photographs covering climate change and the everyday lives of Latin Americans. Zehbruskas, who worked as a staff photographer at a Brazilian newspaper for 11 years before moving to Mexico, says she began publishing her work on Instagram “naturally” and that her feed evolved from a place where she shared personal images to a space for professional work. “The fact that you could share something in real time appealed to me, maybe because of my newspaper background,” she told PDN via email. She says Instagram allowed her to “post images that were true to my vision and style” without having to conform to the wishes of a publication. It also allowed her to “build a story over time, in just one place.”

Ismael Ferdous received a grant in recognition of his project telling stories of the survivors of the 2013 Rana Plaza garment factory collapse.

Ismael Ferdous received a grant in recognition of his project telling stories of the survivors of the 2013 Rana Plaza garment factory collapse. This image depicts the prosthetic leg of Raihan Kabir, who lost his right leg after a machine smashed it during the collapse, trapping him for 14.5 hours in the wreckage.

Documentary photographer Ismail Ferdous won for his project “After Rana Plaza,” which documents the lives of the survivors of the 2013 collapse of the Rana Plaza garment factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Ferdous created the @afterranaplaza Instagram feed to share those stories. Ferdous has an unusual way of sharing his stories on Instagram, publishing still images with audio commentary from his subjects.

getty-instagram-grant-dmitry-markov

An image of a child with Russian Airborne troops, from Dmitry Markov’s Instagram feed, where he often depicts orphaned and underprivileged children.

Dmitry Markov (@dcim.ru) of Pskov, Russia, has used Instagram to share his photographs of orphaned children and highlight the work of charities for which he volunteers, such as the Russian Children’s Fund.

The three recipients were chosen from more than 1,200 photographers in 109 countries, Getty Images said in a statement. Judges for the grants were National Geographic photographer David Guttenfelder; TIME director of photography Kira Pollack; photographers Maggie Steber and Malin Fezehai; and photographer and @everydayiran co-founder Ramin Talaie.

The three recipients “could not better exemplify the original aim of this grant: to document and share stories of underrepresented communities that otherwise rarely come into focus,” said Elodie Mailliet, Getty Images’ Senior Director of Content Partnerships.

Zehbrauskas plans to use the grant money to start a new project creating portraits of the families of 43 students who disappeared from the Ayotzinapa Rural Teachers School last year. Family portraits are important as “a proof of existence, [and in] perpetuating memory and hopefully saving [the missing students] from the fate of being forever forgotten,” Zehbrauskas says.

Beyond the financial award, the recognition for her work “means a great deal,” she adds. “It means that someone is listening to what you have to say, that it is worth it to keep doing it and believing in it.”

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