February 11th, 2014

POYi Posts Winning Entries for Its Newspaper Division Contest (And PDN Names the Photographers)

 

©Taslima Akhter

©Taslima Akhter

Taslima Akhter of Bangladesh has won first prize in Spot News category of the Newspaper Division in the Picture of the Year International (POYi) competition, and Niclas Hammarström has won top prize for the General News category.

POYi organizers have not yet announced the names of the winners, pending completion of judging in all divisions and categories of the competition on February 25. But POYi is posting the winning entries on its web site as they are selected, enabling visitors to the site to figure out who they are. (The Newspaper Photographer of the Year entry has not been posted, however.)

Akhter and Hammarström both won prizes for heartbreaking images. Akhter’s image (shown here), called “Final Embrace,” shows two garment workers who died embracing each other in the collapse of a factory building in Dhaka, Bangladesh last April. Hammarström’s prize-winning photograph, from Aleppo, Syria, shows the badly burned face of a child.

Other categories and first prize winners for the Newspaper Division include:

Feature Pictures Story: Lacy Atkins (San Francisco Chronicle) for “100 Black Men Community Charter School.” (original story here.)
Issue Reporting Picture Story:  Lisa Krantz (San Antonio Express News) for “Twice Betrayed: Military Sexual Trauma.”
News Picture Story:  Tyler Hicks (The New York Times) for “Massacre at a Kenyan Mall.” (see Lens Blog)
Portrait Series: Sara Brincher Galbiati for “Circus Kids of Kabul.”
Portrait: Magnus Wennman (Aftonbladet) for “Merullah.” (Fourth slide in gallery here.)
Feature: John Stanmeyer for “Signal.” (lead and second image here.)
Natural Disaster: Philippe Lopez (AFP/Getty) for “Philippines Weather Typhoon.

Judging for the POYi Sports Division began yesterday. Mark J. Terrill of Associated Press won first prize for Sports Action for his photograph of welterweight boxer Pablo Cesar Cano landing a punch on the face of opponent Ashley Theophane. Jabin Botsford, a student at Western Kentucky University, won first prize in the Sports Feature for an image he shot at a Kentucky high school cheerleading competition.

Other Sports Division category winners will be selected today and tomorrow. Judging for the Reportage Division (formerly Magazine Division) entries begins on Friday and continues through this weekend. Editing and Multimedia Division entries will be judged next week.

March 21st, 2011

Getty, AFP Photogs Missing in Libya; 4 Times Journalists Released

Two photojournalists, Joe Raedle of Getty Images and Roberto Schmidt of Agence France-Presse, and reporter Dave Clark of AFP have been missing in Libya since Saturday, AFP reported Sunday. Clark and Schmidt told editors via email they were working with Raedle in the eastern Libyan city of Tobruk and were planning to meet with opponents of Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi and refugees fleeing the fighting. They were last heard from Saturday.

Today The New York Times reports that four of its journalists missing since Tuesday, including photographers Lynsey Addario and Tyler Hicks, have been released by Libyan authorities.  The four Times journalists, who had entered the country without visas, were arrested while covering the fighting in the eastern Libyan city of Ajdabiya. In a memo to staff, Times editor Bill Keller said the paper waited until the four journalists were safely out of Libya before announcing the news. In today’s   statement, The New York Times says, “We are grateful that our journalists have been released, and we are working to reunite them with their families.  We have been told they are in good health and are in the process of confirming that.”

Several other journalists, however, are believed be held in Libyan custody.  On Saturday,  four journalists with the Al Jazeeera network were detained by Libyan government. A TV cameraperson for the network was killed over the weekend amidst heavy fighting near the rebel-controlled city of Benghazi.

Senior Libyan officials have warned US diplomats that foreign journalists entering the country without visas to cover the rebellion would be considered Al Qaeda collaborators, the AP reports. The US State Department has advised media organizations against sending more journalists into Libya.

Related Stories:
Libya Says It Will Release Times Journalists Today

Lynsey Addario, Tyler Hicks Missing in Libya