March 26th, 2014

Magnum Foundation Awards 10 Emergency Fund Grants

© Oscar B. Castillo

© Oscar B. Castillo

The non-profit Magnum Foundation today announced the winners of its 2014 Emergency Fund Grants, which help photographers investigate and complete stories on critical but under-reported issues. This year’s winners will look at a variety of social and political topics in nine countries. The 2014 EF Grantees and their stories are:
Oscar B. Castillo: “Our War, Our Pain,” Venezuela
Qinggang Chen: “Patients at Muli County,” China
Edmund Clark: “Unseen Spaces of the Global War on Terror,” USA/Afghanistan
Carolyn Drake (with Ashley Cleek):  “Invisible Bus,” USA
Zann Huizhen Huang: “Remember Shatila,” Lebanon
Kai Löffelbein: “Death Metals, Indonesia
Laura Morton: “Wild West Tech,” USA
Ed Ou: “North,” Canada
Alessandro Penso: “Refugees in Bulgaria,” Bulgaria
Christian Werner: “Depleted Uranium – The Silent Genocide,” Kosovo

Magnum Foundation has also announced its newest Human Rights Fellows. The fellowships allow photographers from non-Western countries to participate in the six-week photography and human rights program organized by Magnum Foundation and the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, a program designed to focus students on strategies for visual storytelling in their own countries.

The 2014 Fellows are:
Mohammed Elshamy, 19, Egypt
Abbas Hajimohammadisaniabadi, 30, Iran
Yuyang Liu, 22, China
Loubna Mrie, 22, Syria
Pedro Silveira, 29, Brazil
Sumeja Tulic, 28, Bosnia & Herzegovina

Related articles:
Magnum Foundation Announces 2012 Emergency Fund Grantees

PDN Photo of the Day: Laura Morton: Society Galas in San Francisco

June 24th, 2013

Aaron Siskind Foundation Announces 6 Winners of 2013 Grants

The Aaron Siskind Foundation has announced the winners of its 2013 Individual Photographer’s Fellowship (IPF) grants. The six recipients are documentary photographer Michelle Frankfurter of Takoma Park, Maryland; portrait photographer Wayne Lawrence of Brooklyn, New York; conceptual photographer Joshua Lutz of Katonah, New York; documentary photographer Justin Maxon of Eureka, California; fine-art photographer Jenny Riffle of Seattle; and fine-art photographer Sasha Rudensky of New Haven, Connecticut. The LightBox blog, which posted an interview with Foundation President Charles Traub today, noted that each photographer won an $8,000 prize.

The judges for this year’s competition were TIME Senior Photo Editor Natalie Matutschovsky, photographer Andrew Moore and curator Tim Wride.

The IPF program was started in 1991, the same year that the Foundation was created, in keeping with photographer Aaron Siskind’s request that upon his death his estate be used to support and inspire contemporary photography. The grants are open to photographers of all levels who reside in the U.S. and are 21 years of age or older, as long as their work is “based on the idea of the lens-based image,” according to the Foundation’s website. Awards of up to $10,000 have been given every year since the IPF’s inception—with the exception of 1999, 2002, 2003 and 2006. Past recipients have included Gregory Crewdson, Matt Eich, Lisa Elmaleh, Ashley Gilbertson, Ron Jude, Deana Lawson, Simone Lueck and Lori Waselchuk.

Related Articles:

Wayne Lawrence Wins 2013 Arnold Newman Prize
Justin Maxon Wins $15,000 Alexia Foundation Grant

August 30th, 2012

Tim Matsui Wins Alexia Foundation Women’s Initiative Grant

Tim Matsui submitted the photo above, showing a young woman in Cambodia who was being sold for sex by her mother, as part of his award-winning proposal. © Tim Matsui

 

The first Women’s Initiative grant from Alexia Foundation was awarded to Tim Matsui, who will use the $25,000 to document the sex trafficking of minors in Seattle and King County, Washington. According to James Dooley, executive administrator of the Alexia Foundation, “Matsui’s proposal highlighted a growing and serious problem that is an issue in nearly every city large or small throughout the United States.”

The Alexia Foundation created the Women’s Initiative grant earlier this year to support a photographer documenting “abuses against women in the United States.” The Alexia Foundation Photojournalism Advisory Committee chose Matsui, Mary Calvert and Carlos Javier Ortiz as the three finalists. Judges, including Foundation board members, an administrator from the S.I. Newhouse School of Communications at Syracuse University and Brian Storm, founder of MediaStorm, reviewed all three proposals and awarded the Women’s Initiative grant to Matsui. A symposium, fundraiser and exhibition featuring work from the Women’s Initiative as well as other Alexia Foundation photographers will take place in Fall 2013. Each year the Foundation also awards grants to student and professional photographers who, through their work, “drive change in the effort to make the world a better place.”

Matsui is a documentary, editorial and commercial photographer and multimedia producer based in Seattle. Over the course of his career he’s worked on a number of projects that deal with the sexual abuse of women, including founding a non-profit organization that uses multimedia productions as a way to start discussions on sexual violence.

Related Article:

Alexia Foundation Launches Documentary Grant Focused on Violence Against Women

August 29th, 2012

The Aftermath Project Now Accepting 2013 Grant Applications

The Aftermath Project announced the opening of its 2013 grant cycle, which comes with a $20,000 prize. The deadline for applications is November 5, 2012.

The goal of The Aftermath Project is to support photography projects that document what happens after a conflict has ended. The conflict can be any type of fighting that affects communities, ranging from an international war or regional battle to an ethnic strife or urban riot. Also of interest are stories that are being under-reported by mainstream media. According to application guidelines, “grant proposals should reflect an understanding of this mission.”

The 2013 grant winner and four finalists will be featured in the book War is Only Half the Story, Volume Seven, the foundation’s annual publication. The Aftermath Project has received a $15,000 matching grant from the National Endowment of the Arts (NEA) for the book and will be launching a Kickstarter campaign to raise the rest of the funds in September.

A $20,000 NEA matching grant has also been received for a re-design of theaftermathproject.org. Founder and artistic director, Sara Terry, noted in a press release that the revamped Web site will offer more resources, and better feature the work of current and past grant winners and finalists. Terry also shared the news that Gretchen Landau is joining The Aftermath Project as managing director. Landau will focus on the foundation’s fundraising and outreach initiatives.

To download a grant application, visit theaftermathproject.org.

To learn more about projects that have been awarded the grant in the past, read our interviews with The Aftermath Project’s 2012 grant winner, Andrew Lichtenstein, and 2011 grant winner, David Monteleone.

 

November 19th, 2010

Open Society Announces 2010 Audience Engagement Grant Winners

The Open Society Documentary Photography Project yesterday announced the winners of this year’s Audience Engagement Grants. Founded in 2005 with the name “the Distribution Grant,” the grant seeks to engage communities and decision makers in human rights and social justice issues. Each year, five to eight grants ranging from $5,000 to $30,000 are awarded to photographers who have partnered with individuals or organizations to disseminate their finished photography projects to the public.

This year,  eight grantees were selected:

Andrew Agaba will partner with Africa Leadership Institute (www.aflia.org) on KALISOLISO: The People are Watching, a newspaper supplement, poster campaign, touring exhibition, and blog designed to prevent pre- and post-election violence in Uganda in the February 2011 general elections.

Alit Ambara will partner with Institut Sejarah Sosial Indonesia (ISSI) to present photographs of the victims of the 1965–66 violence in an interactive, multimedia teaching module to be used in Indonesian high school history classes.

Donna De Cesare will partner with Universidad Centroamericana in San Salvador and the The Mesoamerica Center in Antiqua, Guatemala, to combine photography, theater, and skills-based media workshops for youth to address the complex ways that gang violence and migration impact the human rights of young people in Central America.

Kunda Dixit will partner with Madan Puraskar Pustakalaya, the principal archive of books in the Nepali language, to produce Shanti Sangralaya, an educational curriculum and permanent exhibition of photographs, texts, maps, and graphics about the 1996–2006 insurgency in Nepal.

Stephen Ferry will partner with Consejo de Redación in Bogota to create Violentología: Un manual del conflicto colombiano, a visual resource that will be distributed to journalists, editors, and archivists to to instruct and encourage the photographic coverage of Colombia’s human rights crisis.

FIERCE, a membership-based organization in New York City, will partner with Marvin Taylor on Queer Pier: 40 Years, an exhibition and community archiving project that will serve as a tool for FIERCE’s ongoing grassroots organizing and leadership development programs for LGBTQ youth of color in New York City.

Lorena Ros will partner with La Fundación Vicki Bernadet in Barcelona to use Unspoken—a book and multimedia project on adult survivors of child sexual abuse—to create an experiential workshop designed to raise awareness and reach out to women survivors in the Spanish prison system.

Jean-Marie Simon will partner with Oficina de Derechos Humanos del Arzobispado de Guatemala and Estudio A2 (www.a2foto.com) to create a newspaper supplement and a multi-lingual DVD based on her book Guatemala: Eternal Spring, Eternal Tyranny, which documents the height of Guatemala’s civil war in the 1980s.

Information on the grants and application guidelines can be found on the Soros Foundation web site.