October 28th, 2015

PhotoPlus Expo 2015: The State of Editorial Photography

The directors of photography at Women’s Health, Bloomberg BusinessWeek, Garden & Gun, People and GQ shared stories behind shoots and offered insights into how they work with the photographers they hire in a panel discussion hosted by veteran editorial photographer Art Streiber at PhotoPlus Expo this past week. In “The State of Editorial Photography,” panelists spoke about budgets, cover shoots, how video is factoring into their work and how photographers should market to them.

Video

People’s Catriona Ni Aolain noted that TIME, Inc. is positioning itself as a video-first company and said that the People staff discuss whether or not to create video for each story the magazine does, but she also said much of the video produced during shoots with celebrities is created not by photographers but by a separate video team. GQ’s Krista Prestek said the same was true at her magazine, and Streiber noted that he’s being asked for video on only 25 percent of his editorial assignments. When magazines first introduced iPad apps, he was asked to shoot video more frequently, he said.

On shooting covers

Women’s Health’s Sarah Rozen said that her photographers usually get eight hours with their cover models and need to shoot four to five setups. GQ’s Prestek said she saw a trend of getting less and less time with celebrities because “magazines are less essential to celebrities” for getting exposure. Often celebrities will book a string of media appointments in a single day, which leaves editors “jockeying for priority so you don’t get them at the end of the day.” GQ will spend anywhere from $30,000–$100,000 on cover shoots, Prestek said. (more…)

July 15th, 2014

Hey GQ: Do You Like Cedric the Entertainer & Elton Anderson’s Promo?

© Elton Anderson

Cedric the Entertainer © Elton Anderson

Having landed some of his first assignments on the strength of personal work, photographer Elton Anderson has been working on a personal project featuring his favorite celebrities and entertainers to attract the notice of more clients.  Anderson and actor/comedian Cedric Antonio Kyles (aka Cedric the Entertainer) share a common goal–to be featured in GQ–so they recently collaborated on a photo shoot they called “The Road to GQ” to get the magazine’s attention.

© Elton Anderson

Cedric the Entertainer © Elton Anderson

Anderson explains that he was able to approach Cedric by enlisting the help of a friend who was working on digital marketing for Cedric’s TV Land sitcom. Cedric and his team, along with stylist Apuje Kalu and Anderson, strategized ways of incorporating three things that are important to the comedian – fashion, comedy and family – into the shoot. It took place in April 2014. Box Eight Studio in Los Angeles provided a mix of outdoor and indoor locations, and Anderson’s wardrobe stylist brought in a ton of props. Anderson says they were able to shoot six looks in about four hours. “Cedric was funny (of course) but most of all he anticipated what I needed from him as a subject,” says Anderson.

© Elton Anderson

Cedric the Entertainer © Elton Anderson

Though the shoot has yet to lead to an assignment for GQ, Anderson says the results are encouraging. A few GQ editors gave Cedric some social media shout-outs, and Anderson says Cedric has had a few email exchanges with the magazine. “If anything,” Anderson says, “the images have strengthened my portfolio by leaps and bounds and allowed me to set up meetings” with other potential clients, including TV Land, BET, BONOBOS, Essence, Walmart, and Capitol Records.

© Elton Anderson

Cedric the Entertainer © Elton Anderson

Anderson, who would like to shoot more musicians for editorial and commercial clients, also recently photographed his favorite rapper, Kendrick Lamar. Anderson had only five minutes with Lamar, but says, “It’s really fun to take a celebrity and bring them into your world for a minute. I end up making really cool friends along with great imagery.”

© Elton Anderson

Cedric the Entertainer © Elton Anderson

And it’s a a good way to move your career forward. “Personal work is the fuel that keeps me growing creatively and professionally,” says Anderson, a former pharmaceutical sales rep who moved to Los Angeles to pursue photography full time in 2012. “Potential clients tend to gravitate heavily to the work I cooked up in my brain and executed versus something I got paid to do. I actually booked my first big jobs with Disney, Monster Headphones and Walmart because of my personal work so I’m motivated to shoot for myself on a more continuous basis.”

© Elton Anderson

Cedric the Entertainer © Elton Anderson

March 26th, 2014

How Should Clients React to Sexual Coercion Allegations Against Terry Richardson?

Now that another model has come forward with allegations of sexual misconduct against photographer Terry Richardson, his clients face a difficult question: What ethical obligations, if any, do they have to take a stand?

Over the past several years, reports have periodically flared up that Richardson has manipulated some models to engage with him in unwanted sexual contact during photo shoots at his studio. The models have described the incidents as casting couch situations that occurred when they were students or aspiring models, not established models working on set for ad campaigns or editorial shoots.

The allegations surfaced again in recent weeks after former model Charlotte Waters published a graphic account of a shoot with Richardson that spiraled out of her control. “I was completely a sex puppet,” she recounted anonymously in a post on a Reddit thread. The post has since been removed, but after her story was widely circulated, Waters identified herself as the author.

She has spoken to New York City police, according to Styleite.com, but she reportedly never said “no” to Richardson’s advances, and she isn’t pressing any charges.

In the hot seat of bad publicity once again, Richardson issued an angry denial to all the allegations in a letter to the Huffington Post, calling them “hate filled, libelous tales.” In the letter, he painted himself as the victim of a “witch hunt.”

Richardson says in the letter, “I collaborated with consenting adult women who were fully aware of the nature of the work.” Overlooking the disparity in power between himself and the models, he adds, “I have never used an offer of work or a threat of rebuke to coerce someone into something that they did not want to do.” (more…)