December 14th, 2012

Stanley Greene Wins 2013 Aftermath Grant

Stanley Greene has won the 2013 Aftermath Grant for his proposal to create a new project, “The Rise of Islam in the Caucasus,” The Aftermath Project organization announced today. The Aftermath Grant, worth $20,000 in 2013, supports photographers whose work addresses the legacy of conflict.

In making the announcement, The Aftermath Project noted that Greene is the first “conflict photographer,” as Greene is widely known, to win an Aftermath Project grant. Greene is a member of the photographer collective NOOR Images.

Finalists for the grant include Gwenn Dubourthoumieu, who is pursuing an ongoing project about sexual violence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo; Boryana Katsarova, who is working in post-conflict Kosovo, concentrating on the city of Kosovska Mitrovia; Isabel Kiesewetter, who is working on a project that investigates how former military bases in East and West Germany are presently being utilized; and Martino Lombezzi, whose project examines the impact of the border fence between Lebanon and Israel has on local populations.

Greene’s proposal and those of the finalists were selected from 234 entries from around the world.

The first round of judging for the grant was completed by Aftermath Project Founder Sara Terry and Aperture editor Denise Wolff. Terry and photographers Nina Berman and Eros Hoagland selected the winner and finalists.

The 2013 Aftermath Project grant is supported by The Foundation to Promote Open Society.

Related: Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application
$20,000 Aftermath Project Grant for 2012 Awarded to Andrew Lichtenstein
Look3 Report: Stanley Greene on Luck, Film and Supporting Young Photographers
Eros Hoagland Wins $20K Grant for Conflict Photographers

November 1st, 2011

Eros Hoagland Wins $20k Grant for Conflict Photogs

The Aftermath Project, a grant making organization focused on funding photojournalism covering post-conflict stories, recently awarded a special $20,000 grant to photographer Eros Hoagland, who will work on a personal project that explores how photographing conflicts has affected his own life.

In the announcement of the award, Aftermath Project founder and director Sara Terry said: “Hoagland’s project, ‘The Green Room,’ stood out for his candid discussion of several themes, including emotional disconnect; the consequences of being the son of a war photographer, John Hoagland, who was killed in El Salvador at the age of 34; the impact that choices made by war photographers have on loved ones; the mythology of war photographers; and the desire to foster a public conversation on war, photography, PTSD and our understanding of these topics.”

Hoagland, who is represented by Redux, has worked in Iraq, El Salvador, Mexico and Guatemala, among other conflict-torn areas.

The special grant for conflict photographers was established in honor of Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros, who died in April while covering the uprising in Libya. Joan Morgenstern, Danny DeVito and Rhea Perlman, Chris Meledandri, Martha Kellner, Betsy Karel and Neal Baer supported the grant.

According to Terry, the proposals The Aftermath Project received for the grant were so impressive that the organization aims to repeat the grant next year if it can find funding.

The Aftermath Project also awarded a grant of $5,000 to an unnamed translator/fixer to create a story about his work. According to the announcement, the recipient is an Iraqi citizen who worked closely with photographer Andrea Bruce and other Western journalists during the war in Iraq. He will remain anonymous until he and his family complete their emigration to the United States. Photographer Elizabeth Rappaport funded the fixer/translator grant.