February 12th, 2016

Fund Your Work: Four Documentary Photography Prizes Looking for Applications

The Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) at Duke University has extended the deadline for its $3,000 Documentary Essay Prize to February 23, 2016. The prize honors a documentary photography project that is ongoing or that has been completed in the past two years. The three-year old award alternates year to year in honoring writing and photography. The previous winner for photography was Latvian photographer Iveta Vaivode, for her series “Somewhere on a Disappearing Path,” which reimagined the photographer’s family album. There is a $35 entry fee.

CDS is also accepting applications for the $10,000 Dorothea Lange–Paul Taylor Prize. Named in recognition of the collaboration between Lange, a photographer, and Taylor, a writer, the prize recognizes the work of documentary artists pursuing projects that feature an interplay of words and pictures. Recent winners include Michel Huneault, Jon Lowenstein, Jen Kinney, Sarah Dohrman and Tiana Markova-Gold, and Teru Kuwayama and Christian Parenti. Any artist, or team of artists, pursuing a project that combines words and images can apply for the prize. There are no nationality restrictions. The entry fee is $65, and applications are being accepted through May 9, 2016.

Photographers living and working in the Arab region can apply for one of 12, $5,000 grants being awarded by The Arab Fund for Arts and Culture in partnership with the Prince Claus Fund for Culture and Development and the Magnum Foundation. Photographers awarded the AFAC’s Arab Documentary Photo Program grants are expected to complete projects within eight months, and they are required to attend two workshops. There is no fee to enter, and applications are due by April 1, 2016.

The UK-based Royal Photographic Society, in partnership with The Guardian, is currently seeking entries for the £2000 ($2900) Joan Wakelin Bursary, which supports a “photographic essay on an overseas social documentary issue.” The bursary, named for Wakelin, a deceased Honorary Fellow of the society, is open to photographers of any nationality and there are no application fees. Shortlisted photographers, however, are required to interview at The Guardian’s offices in London in July. Applications are due May 20, 2016.

Related: Advice on Funding Your Photo Project
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$10K Lange-Taylor Prize Goes to Michel Huneault for Project About Oil Train Disaster

September 21st, 2015

$10K Lange–Taylor Prize Goes to Michel Huneault for Project About Oil Train Disaster

Chaudière River at sunrise, February 2014. From "Post Mégantic" by Michel Huneault, winner of the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize.

“Chaudière River at sunrise,” February 2014. From “Post Mégantic” by Michel Huneault, winner of the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize.

Canadian photographer Michel Huneault has won the Dorothea Lange–Paul Taylor Prize from The Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) at Duke University, CDS announced today. Huneault was recognized with the $10,000 award for his project documenting the aftermath of an oil train derailment and explosion that killed 47 people in the small town of Lac-Mégantic, Quebec.

The award, named in honor of the partnership between documentary photographer Dorothea Lange and writer Paul Taylor, supports long-term documentary work that combines images and words to tell a story.

Huneault’s project, “Post Mégantic,” relies on photographs, videos, oral histories, and installations to delve into the aftermath of the catastrophic explosion in 2013, which levelled the Lac-Mégantic town center and left one in 128 citizens dead. Huneault has spent more than two months in the town over the course of fourteen trips, and he plans to use the the Lange–Taylor Prize to continue the project.

Serge, September 2013. From "Post MÈgantic" by Michel Huneault, winner of the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize.

“Serge,” September 2013. From “Post MÈgantic” by Michel Huneault, winner of the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize.

“I’ll keep going back [to Lac-Mégantic]—hopefully to find more light and healing—but also up the train track toward North Dakota, to where this oil and darkness originated,” Huneault writes in his project statement. “Today, although Mégantic’s center remains flattened and contaminated while the criminal investigation continues, the tracks were the first thing to be rebuilt and train traffic has resumed. While no oil is transiting here, [they are] passing through other North American towns.”

Dandelion achenes, June 2014. From "Post Mégantic" by Michel Huneault, winner of the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize.

“Dandelion achenes,” June 2014. From “Post Mégantic” by Michel Huneault, winner of the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize.

The Center for Documentary Studies awarded an honorable mention to Alice Leora Briggs and Julián Cardona for their project about violence in Juárez, Mexico. In addition, Serge J-F. Levy received special recognition for his project about relocating from New York City to Tucson, Arizona.

Previous winners Lange-Taylor Prize winners include Antonin Kratochvil and Jan Novak; Donna DeCesare and Luis Rodriguez; Paola Ferrario and Mary Cappello; Larry Frolick and Donald Weber; Teru Kuwayama and Christian Parenti, and Jen Kinney. The prize has been awarded a total of 23 times.

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Lange-Taylor Prize of 10K Given For Photo Project On Tiny Alaska Town
A Photographic Response to an Oil Train Explosion

September 16th, 2013

Lange-Taylor Prize of 10K Given For Photo Project On Tiny Alaska Town

The Begich Towers after midnight, Whittier, Alaska, 2012.. Photograph by Jen Kinney, winner of the 2013 Lange-Taylor Prize.

The Begich Towers after midnight, Whittier, Alaska, 2012. Nearly all of the residents of Whittier, Alaska live in the 14-story apartment building. Photograph by Jen Kinney, winner of the 2013 Lange-Taylor Prize.

The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University has awarded the 2013 Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize to photographer Jen Kinney for “City Under One Roof,” a project about Whittier, Alaska, a remote town of 200 people on Prince William Sound accessible only via one of the longest tunnels in the country.

Nearly all of the residents of Whittier live in a single apartment building. Kinney’s work examines “how the structures that people inhabit shape and order their lives; how, in turn, people construct, alter, and destroy spaces; and how these constant renovations to our physical world mirror changes in the stories that we tell ourselves, and how we structure our lives to these stories,” a statement from the CDS said.

The Lange-Taylor Prize Committee also awarded a “special recognition” to Bianca Giaever for her innovative approach to using images and words to tell personal, philosophical stories. Her video “Holy Cow Lisa,” which she submitted as part of her proposal, can be seen on Vimeo at http://vimeo.com/54700919

The Lange-Taylor prize is named in honor of the collaboration between photographer Dorothea Lange and writer Paul Taylor, and it seeks to encourage similar collaboration in the field of documentary storytelling.

The finalists for the 2013 Lange-Taylor Prize were Christopher Capozziello, Vincent Cianni, Maja Daniels, Matt Eich and Kate Linthicum, Margot Herster, Simon Hipkins and Agata Skowronek, Brenda Kenneally, Tom King, Gillian Laub, Sara Lewkowicz, Justin Maxon, Alec Soth and Brad Zellar, and Will Steacy.

Related: Lange-Taylor Documentary Prize Suspended for 2011