April 22nd, 2014

Daniel Berehulak to Receive Getty Images & Chris Hondros Fund Award

© Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

© Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

Photojournalist Daniel Berehulak has been chosen the winner of the Getty Images & Chris Hondros Fund Award, the Chris Hondros Fund announced today. Berehulak, a photojournalist based in New Delhi, India, will receive a $20,000 prize to support his documentary work. Preston Gannaway, a US photographer, has been named a finalist for the award, and will receive a $5,000 prize.

The awards will be given on May 7, at a benefit for the Chris Hondros Fund to be held at Aperture Gallery in New York. The Chris Hondros Fund is a non-profit photojournalism organization founded in memory of photojournalist Chris Hondros, who was killed in a mortar attack while covering the conflict in Libya in April 2011. The Fund “advances the work of photojournalists who espouse [Chris Hondros's] legacy and vision, and sponsors fellowships, grant making and education to raise understanding of the issues facing reporters in conflict zones.”

Berehulak, who is represented by Reportage by Getty Images, the same agency that represented Hondros, said in a statement, “I had the pleasure of knowing Chris as a colleague and looked up to him as one would an older brother.”

Earlier this year, Berehulak was named Freelance Photographer of the Year at the Pictures of the Year International (POYi) competition for a portfolio of work that included his story about malnutrition in Afghanistan, published in The New York Times.

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Tomas Munita, Bryan Denton to Receive Getty & Chris Hondros Fund Awards

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Daniel Berehulak Named 2014 POYi Freelance Photographer of the Year

June 5th, 2013

Events, Awards and Other Photo Happenings

Events

Tonight at the New York Public Library, photography educator and historian Deborah Willis will discuss Leonard Freed‘s photographs of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Joining Willis on the panel will be photographers Eli Reed and Jamel Shabazz, scholar Paul M. Farber, writer Michael Eric Dyson, and Freed’s widow, Brigitte Freed. The event begins at 6pm.

The Chris Hondros Fund, which supports photojournalism with fellowships and other programs, is holding a benefit online print auction through June 7. Work by Slim Aarons, James Balog, Al Bello, Andrea Bruce, Robert Capa, Ernst Haas, Michael Kamber, Ed Ou, Joao Silva and many other photographers is for sale.

Free seminars at Review Santa Fe start this Friday with “The Business of Photography.” On Saturday a panel of photographers will discuss “New Methods For Engaging Audiences,” and on Sunday Guggenheim Fellow John Gossage will lecture on “Contemporary Photographic Practice.” For more public events check out the Review Santa Fe event schedule.

Italian photographic education organization Cesura is running a travel workshop in Cairo in November. Led by Gabriele Micalizzi, who covered the Egyptian revolution, workshop participants will also have the option of a two-day supplemental workshop with photographer Moises Saman.

Awards

Kevin Miller received The New Orleans Photo Alliance‘s 2013 Michael P. Smith Fund for Documentary Photography Grant for his project on the Panama Canal expansion. (more…)

May 15th, 2013

Tomas Munita, Bryan Denton to Receive Getty & Chris Hondros Fund Awards

Tomás Munita and Bryan Denton will receive Getty Images and Chris Hondros Fund Awards at a June 7 benefit and silent auction, the Hondros Fund has announced. The Chris Hondros Fund is a non-profit photojournalism organization founded by Christina Piaia to honor her late fiancé, who was killed in a mortar attack while covering the conflict in Libya in 2011. The Fund “advances the work of photojournalists who espouse [Chris Hondros's] legacy and vision, and sponsors fellowships, grantmaking and education to raise understanding of the issues facing reporters in conflict zones.”

Munita, a Chilean photojournalist who has worked in Latin America and the Middle East, among other places, is being honored for his “exceptional photographic ability coupled with a spirited commitment to the craft of photojournalism,” Piaia said in a statement. Munita will receive a grant of $20,000.

Denton, a photojournalist based in Beirut, was named a finalist for the award and will receive a grant of $5000.

“Chris was dedicated to documenting the compassion, violence and frailty that encompasses so much of our world today. It was through his personal vision and determination that were able to share some of the most powerful images from the large and small events that make up our common humanity,” said Hondros Fund board member and Getty executive Pancho Bernasconi in a statement. “The Chris Hondros Fund is proud to honor Tomás Munita and Bryan Denton and support their work to create a visual history that brings shared human experiences into the public eye.”

Related Articles:
Andrea Bruce Wins Getty Images & Chris Hondros Fund Award
Tim Hetherington, Chris Hondros: Remembering Them as They Lived

March 11th, 2013

Park Officials Block Effort to Name Lawn For Slain Photojournalist Chris Hondros

© Brooklyn Bridge Park

© Brooklyn Bridge Park

A campaign to get Brooklyn Bridge Park to name a lawn after photojournalist Chris Hondros, a Brooklyn resident who was killed in Libya in April 2011, is being blocked by Park authorities who now say they will not accept proper names submitted to its Name That Lawn contest. (*March 13, 2013: See Update to this story, below.)

In February, Brooklyn Bridge Park, a city-run park, announced on its website that it was running a Name That Lawn contest to solicit names for a stretch of green on a recently repurposed pier. Patrick Whelan, photo editor at the Wall Street Journal, suggested it be named for Hondros, a New York native and winner of the Robert Capa Gold Medal. Soon dozens of friends and colleagues of the late photographer had spread the word via social media, and news about the campaign ran run on the websites of DNAInfo and a local CBS news affiliate.

On March 9, however, several people who had submitted Hondros’s name received an email signed by Nancy Webster of Brooklyn Bridge Park, saying the Park was looking only for names that described aspects of the park.  Acknowledging the volume of emails suggesting Hondros’s name, Webster’s email added, “While we very much appreciate the desire to honor Chris’s memory, we are also keenly aware that there are so very many deserving and special Brooklyn residents to memorialize and pay tribute to. And as such, the naming of one lawn for one person does not seem fully inclusive of the
larger community.”

Webster noted that the rule change had been added to  the contest page of the Park’s website. It now reads, “We are looking specifically for a name that reflects the geography or features of the park, so no proper names please.”

Photographer Alan Chin, an early promoter of Whalen’s idea, called Webster’s email “disingenuous.” “All kinds of parks and parts of parks are named for all kinds of people. In my own neighborhood of Red Hook here, there’s the ‘Louis J. Valentino Park’ named for a local firefighter who died in a burning building in 1996. Wouldn’t the ‘Chris Hondros Meadow’ be in exactly the same spirit?” (Among city-run parks in Brooklyn alone, Chin might have added McCarren Park, Maria Hernandez Park, J.J. Byrne Playground, or the Lt. Federico Narvarez Tot Lot, which were named for a state senator, a city council member, a Building Department clerk and a New York police lieutenant who died in 1996.)

He said that the Park’s “backtracking” on the rules of its own contest “is graceless and insulting in the extreme.”

Webster’s email claims that the Park would contact the Chris Hondros Fund, the non-profit foundation created after his death to support photography education and photojournalism projects, “to explore other ways to honor his memory.”

Christina Piaia, president of the Chris Hondros Fund did not say whether the Park had been in touch, but sent PDN the following statement: “We feel humbled by the outpouring of love and support evident in the notes shared with us, and, in the spirit of Chris, this serves as a testament to the incredible life he led and legacy he leaves behind in each of us.”

Whalen says the Park’s decision is “disappointing,” but he hopes that supporters of the campaign will rally around another effort to create a place named for Hondros where friends and colleagues could meet or talk about his work. “Next month will be the second anniversary of our loss as well as Chris’ birthday. I feel the time is right and the support is there to make this happen.”

* Update, March 13, 2013: Four days after the Brooklyn Bridge Park changed  the rules of the contest; the Park has responded to criticism of its change by calling the contest off, The New York Times reports today.


Related Articles

Chris Hondros Remembered as Humanist, Friend

Chris Hondros Dies of Injuries in Libya

Andrea Bruce Wins Getty Images & Chris Hondros Fund Award

 

September 6th, 2012

Getty Names 2012 Editorial Grant Winners: Four Photographers and Chris Hondros Fund

© Kosuke Okahara

Photojournalists Bharat Choudhary, Kosuke Okahara, Paolo Marchetti and Sebastian Liste have been named the winners of Getty Images’ 2012 Grants for Editorial Photography. They will each receive $20,000 to support ongoing documentary projects.  Getty Images also announced it was awarding a grant of $20,000 to the Chris Hondros Fund. Created in memory of photographer Chris Hondros, who was killed in Libya in April 2011, the non-profit Chris Hondros Fund seeks to raise awareness of issues facing those who report from conflict zones and to support photojournalists through grants and scholarships.

The Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography have been awarded annually since 2005. The mission of the grants is “to enable emerging and established photojournalists to pursue projects of personal and editorial merit, focusing attention on significant social and cultural issues.” Photographers do not have to be affiliated with Getty Images to be considered.

Among this year’s winners are photographers who plan to use a variety of media in their projects:

Bharat Choudhary has spent two years documenting the lives of young Muslims in America and Great Britain in his series “The Silence of Others.” He next plans to document the experience of Muslim youth in France.

Kosuke Okahara’s “Fragments/Fukishima” looks at the devastation wrought by the meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power in Japan in March 2011. Kosuke says his two goals now are to “to try and identify what this disaster truly means to the world through imagery and audio interviews. The second is to collect the fragments of Fukushima for future generations.”

Paolo Marchetti’s “FEVER-The Awakening of European Fascism” looks at the growing number of followers of the extreme right in Europe. He plans to use the grant to document this issue in the UK, France, Spain and Hungary.

Sebastian Liste’s “The Brazilian Far West” looks at inequities in Brazil, where 4 percent of landowners control 80 percent of the arable land. Liste, who was selected for PDN’s 30 this year, plans to use his grant to “create a multimedia map of the origin of inequality and violence in Brazil through photography, video and interviews.”

The judges for the 2012 grants were:  Whitney Johnson, Director of Photography, The New Yorker; Kira Pollack, Director of Photography, TIME Magazine; Jean-Francois Leroy, Director, Visa Pour l’Image;  Barbara Griffin, Senior Vice President of Image Management, Turner Broadcasting Systems and Stephanie Sinclair, Photographer, VII.

More information on the Getty editorial grants can be found on the Getty Images web site.

* Photo, above: Police officers at a checkpoint in the town of Namie, which is 27km from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power point. © Kosuke Okahara.

Related Articles:
Andrea Bruce Wins Getty Images and Chris Hondros Fund Grant

The Year in Photography: Kosuke Okahara on Fukishima

June 19th, 2012

Auction to Benefit Chris Hondros Fund to be Held June 21

A silent auction and cocktail reception will be held Thursday, June 21 in Manhattan  to benefit the grantmaking and fellowship programs of the Chris Hondros Fund. The fund, a non-profit organization, was established to honor the life and work of Chris Hondros, the award-winning Getty Images photographer killed in Libya in April 2011. It supports photojournalists through grants and a fellowship to the Eddie Adams Workshop, and it support organizations that educate the public about photojournalism.

At the reception, the inaugural Getty Images and Chris Hondros Fund Award will be given to the  winners, Andrea Bruce and  Dominic Bracco II.  Among the items being sold through the silent auction are a print by Robert Capa (donated by the International Center of Photography),  Murray Garrett’s signed 1953 portrait of Marilyn Monroe, prints by Todd Heisler, Lynn Johnson, Rick Loomis and other photographers, and the Super Bowl XLVI football, autographed by Eli Manning.

The event will be held at the James Burden Mansion from 6 to 9pm. Tickets are still available for $50.  Tickets can be bought online at www.chrishondrosfund/benefit.  Information on the Chris Hondros Fund can be found on the fund’s web site, www.chrishondrosfund.org.

Related Article
Andrea Bruce Wins Getty Images & Chris Hondros Fund Award