April 11th, 2013

New Movie Explores Life and Work of Tim Hetherington Through His Family and Friends

There’s a long moment of dread near the beginning of Sebastian Junger’s new film about the life and death of Tim Hetherington. A video camera pans around a car full of journalists covering the uprising in Libya in April 2011. Hetherington and Chris Hondros are among them. As the car sets off through war-ravaged streets, Hetherington can be overheard asking, “Which way is the front line from here?”

That scene foreshadows the tragic ending of the film. Hetherington and Hondros died that day in Misrata when the rebels they were with came under mortar attack. Junger unspools those final moments with a deliberate and dramatic recounting by other photographers who were at the scene.

The film–Which Way Is the Front Line From Here? The Life and Time of Tim Hetherington–will have its broadcast premiere on April 18 on HBO, which funded the production. The film is both biography and homage, depicting Hetherington as an exceptional photographer and humanitarian, as well as as a warm, funny, generous man. It is also rich with insight about what really matters in photography, and more importantly, life, though the lessons came for Junger–and viewers–at a high cost.

A master story teller to start with, journalist and director Junger could not have had a more sympathetic subject.  He also had an unusually rich trove of material to work with: interviews–many of them quite raw emotionally– with so many people who were close to Hetherington, his remarkable photography archive, and plenty of existing video footage.

Much of that was behind-the-scenes footage from Restrepo, the Oscar-winning documentary about a platoon of American soldiers in Afghanistan that Junger and Hetherington made together. But Junger also had plenty of other footage to draw from, most notably that of Hetherington covering the war in Liberia during the 1990s. It was shot by James Brabazon, whom Hetherington worked with at the time.

Junger, an adventure writer and best-selling author of The Perfect Storm, is fascinated by the courage of men who risk their lives with adrenaline-infused feats of derring-do. And Which Way Is the Front Line From Here? is, on one level, a celebration of courage. War is risky. It’s dramatic, and it pulls in audiences. (And Junger explains in the film that he took Hetherington on to help shoot Restrepo partly because of the courage Hetherington had demonstrated in Liberia.)

But Junger is interested in courage in the service of  some higher purpose, and Hetherington certainly had that.  From the start of his career he was interested in the physical and psychological toll that war takes on individual people. Moreover, he always went in search of hope, not just suffering.

As photojournalist Chris Anderson and others interviewed in the film point out, Hetherington’s work was not primarily about war, but about human nature.

Hetherington says in one of the film’s clips that moral outrage motivated him but wasn’t a useful tool to get people to engage with the stories he told. “I think we need to build bridges to people,” he said. Within Junger’s film is a tutorial on how Hetherington went about it.

In one clip he says he doesn’t care about photography “per se;” for him it was a means to an end, which was to connect with people. That informed his approach, too.  Hetherington shot medium format in order to get the camera away from his face, so he could engage directly with his subjects. Those interviewed for the film–including his parents, colleagues, and friends–talk about Hetherington’s warmth and humor toward everyone he met.

And Junger shows it, with numerous clips of Hetherington interacting with all types kinds of subjects, from children to warriors.

Much of Hetherington’s work is about what happens to soldiers who fall under the spell of war. Restrepo, for instance, explores the bonding and self-sacrifice of soldiers in close quarters, trying to help one another survive. One of Hetherington’s central questions, Brabazon points out in the film, is: How do young men see themselves in war, and why? The question infused Hetherington’s work from Liberia to Afghanistan.

Junger’s film suggests that Hetherington ultimately fell under the spell of war himself, and that was his undoing. By various accounts, he was ready by 2010 to quit photographing in and around war. He’d had close calls in Afghanistan. He also feared ending up alone, without a wife and family, if he kept running off to cover stories in conflict zones.

But Hetherington was having difficulty flipping between the realities of his personal life and his work life. And Junger points out that winning the Oscar award for Restrepo was both intoxicating and alarming for Hetherington, presumably because it so strongly affirmed the career path he was trying to escape.

When Libya exploded, Hetherington saw photojournalists–his own band of brothers–running to cover the action. He couldn’t resist the urge to join them. His father, who is interviewed extensively in the film, warned him not to go. So did Chris Anderson, who says in the film that he told Hetherington:  “This is not your story right now.” And it wasn’t. The point of Hetherington’s work had never been to document fighting.

Junger’s new film portrays Hetherington as a a rare talent and inspiration, but in so doing it also raises despair, and an imprecation: If only Hetherington had glanced at Libya, and heeded the internal voice that was telling him it was time to leave conflict journalism behind…

Related:
Tim Hetherington Killed in Libya
Chris Hondros Dies in Libya

March 11th, 2013

Park Officials Block Effort to Name Lawn For Slain Photojournalist Chris Hondros

© Brooklyn Bridge Park

© Brooklyn Bridge Park

A campaign to get Brooklyn Bridge Park to name a lawn after photojournalist Chris Hondros, a Brooklyn resident who was killed in Libya in April 2011, is being blocked by Park authorities who now say they will not accept proper names submitted to its Name That Lawn contest. (*March 13, 2013: See Update to this story, below.)

In February, Brooklyn Bridge Park, a city-run park, announced on its website that it was running a Name That Lawn contest to solicit names for a stretch of green on a recently repurposed pier. Patrick Whelan, photo editor at the Wall Street Journal, suggested it be named for Hondros, a New York native and winner of the Robert Capa Gold Medal. Soon dozens of friends and colleagues of the late photographer had spread the word via social media, and news about the campaign ran run on the websites of DNAInfo and a local CBS news affiliate.

On March 9, however, several people who had submitted Hondros’s name received an email signed by Nancy Webster of Brooklyn Bridge Park, saying the Park was looking only for names that described aspects of the park.  Acknowledging the volume of emails suggesting Hondros’s name, Webster’s email added, “While we very much appreciate the desire to honor Chris’s memory, we are also keenly aware that there are so very many deserving and special Brooklyn residents to memorialize and pay tribute to. And as such, the naming of one lawn for one person does not seem fully inclusive of the
larger community.”

Webster noted that the rule change had been added to  the contest page of the Park’s website. It now reads, “We are looking specifically for a name that reflects the geography or features of the park, so no proper names please.”

Photographer Alan Chin, an early promoter of Whalen’s idea, called Webster’s email “disingenuous.” “All kinds of parks and parts of parks are named for all kinds of people. In my own neighborhood of Red Hook here, there’s the ‘Louis J. Valentino Park’ named for a local firefighter who died in a burning building in 1996. Wouldn’t the ‘Chris Hondros Meadow’ be in exactly the same spirit?” (Among city-run parks in Brooklyn alone, Chin might have added McCarren Park, Maria Hernandez Park, J.J. Byrne Playground, or the Lt. Federico Narvarez Tot Lot, which were named for a state senator, a city council member, a Building Department clerk and a New York police lieutenant who died in 1996.)

He said that the Park’s “backtracking” on the rules of its own contest “is graceless and insulting in the extreme.”

Webster’s email claims that the Park would contact the Chris Hondros Fund, the non-profit foundation created after his death to support photography education and photojournalism projects, “to explore other ways to honor his memory.”

Christina Piaia, president of the Chris Hondros Fund did not say whether the Park had been in touch, but sent PDN the following statement: “We feel humbled by the outpouring of love and support evident in the notes shared with us, and, in the spirit of Chris, this serves as a testament to the incredible life he led and legacy he leaves behind in each of us.”

Whalen says the Park’s decision is “disappointing,” but he hopes that supporters of the campaign will rally around another effort to create a place named for Hondros where friends and colleagues could meet or talk about his work. “Next month will be the second anniversary of our loss as well as Chris’ birthday. I feel the time is right and the support is there to make this happen.”

* Update, March 13, 2013: Four days after the Brooklyn Bridge Park changed  the rules of the contest; the Park has responded to criticism of its change by calling the contest off, The New York Times reports today.


Related Articles

Chris Hondros Remembered as Humanist, Friend

Chris Hondros Dies of Injuries in Libya

Andrea Bruce Wins Getty Images & Chris Hondros Fund Award

 

February 11th, 2013

Guy Martin, CJ Chivers Give Testimony in Inquest Into Tim Hetherington’s Death

The Coroner’s Court in Westminster, UK, carrying out an inquest into the death of photographer Tim Hetherington concluded that his death was “unlawful,” The Independent reports.  The photojournalist and documentary-film maker died April 20, 2011 in a mortar attack in Misrata, Libya, where he was covering fighting between forces loyal to Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi and rebel fighters. Photojournalist Chris Hondros was also killed in the attack.

The court heard a written statement from Istanbul-based photographer Guy Martin, one of two photographers who were wounded by shrapnel in the same incident. Testimony was also provided by New York Times journalist CJ Chivers, who toured the scene of the attack later, and concluded the mortars which had struck the building in which the photographers were killed had been fired by Qaddafi loyalists. In giving her verdict of “unlawful killing,” deputy Westminster coroner Dr. Shirley Radcliffe said of Hetherington, “He was not a soldier, he was an innocent photographer.” It’s unclear if the ruling means Hetherington and the other civilians had been targeted by Qaddafi loyalists.

Martin’s written statement, in which he described the “catastrophic” violence the band of photographers had witnessed that morning, as well as his last glimpse of Hondros, makes chilling reading for anyone who knew the two slain photographers.

Martin stated, The Independant reports, that after seeing “hand-to-hand fighting” and “incoming mortar fire coming from miles away, “ the photographers returned to their base and discussed what to do next. According to Martin, Hetherington argued that they should continue to follow rebel fighters. Martin said that shortly after he was struck, he lost consciousness, and only learned of the deaths of his colleagues a week later, when he was trying to flee Libya.

In her verdict, Radcliffe also said the cause of Hetherington’s death was  “massive hemorrhage.”

After Hetherington’s death, his friend and collaborator, writer Sebastian Junger, said Hetherington could have survived his injuries if someone on the ground had administered basic lifesaving techniques. Junger has established Reporters Instructed in Saving Colleagues (RISC) to provide free first-aid training to journalists covering war zones.

Outside the court after yesterday’s inquest, Judith Hetherington, the photographer’s mother, broke down in tears while speaking to reporters. “”He was a wonderful humanitarian,” she said.

Related Articles
Free Conflict-Training Course Now Accepting Applications

Tim Hetherington Killed in Libya

Chris Hondros Dies of Injuries in Libya

Hetherington, Hondros Loved Ones Choose Memorial Charities

Sebastian Junger’s Tim Hetherington Doc to Premiere At Sundance

June 19th, 2012

Auction to Benefit Chris Hondros Fund to be Held June 21

A silent auction and cocktail reception will be held Thursday, June 21 in Manhattan  to benefit the grantmaking and fellowship programs of the Chris Hondros Fund. The fund, a non-profit organization, was established to honor the life and work of Chris Hondros, the award-winning Getty Images photographer killed in Libya in April 2011. It supports photojournalists through grants and a fellowship to the Eddie Adams Workshop, and it support organizations that educate the public about photojournalism.

At the reception, the inaugural Getty Images and Chris Hondros Fund Award will be given to the  winners, Andrea Bruce and  Dominic Bracco II.  Among the items being sold through the silent auction are a print by Robert Capa (donated by the International Center of Photography),  Murray Garrett’s signed 1953 portrait of Marilyn Monroe, prints by Todd Heisler, Lynn Johnson, Rick Loomis and other photographers, and the Super Bowl XLVI football, autographed by Eli Manning.

The event will be held at the James Burden Mansion from 6 to 9pm. Tickets are still available for $50.  Tickets can be bought online at www.chrishondrosfund/benefit.  Information on the Chris Hondros Fund can be found on the fund’s web site, www.chrishondrosfund.org.

Related Article
Andrea Bruce Wins Getty Images & Chris Hondros Fund Award

April 20th, 2012

Tim Hetherington, Chris Hondros: Remembering Them As They Lived

© chrishondrosfund.org

Anniversaries like today are difficult, in part because they remind us how the people we mourn died, not how they lived.

To bring some good out of tragedy, the families and loved ones of Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros, who died a year ago today in Misrata, Libya, asked that gifts in their memories be made to charities and funds that continue the work to which they gave so much of their energy and time. These memorials have already resulted in scholarships and other good works that continue their legacies and remind us of the commitment that inspired their careers.

 

© timhetherington.org

After his death, the family of Tim Hetherington selected three charities that he supported:

Human Rights Watch, the independent organization dedicated to defending and protecting human rights; Hetherington was documenting the humanitarian crisis in Libya for Human Rights at the time of his death: hrw.org

Milton Margai School for the Blind in Sierra Leone,
a school where Hetherington photographed and worked with students (and set up a pen-pal exchange) who had been intentionally blinded by the Revolutionary United Force: www.miltonmargaischool.org

Committee to Protect Journalists,the non-profit organization which since 1981 has promoted press freedom around the world by protecting and defending journalists from fear of reprisal: cpj.org

In addition, Hetherington’s parents, Judith and Alistair Hetherington, are now setting up a non-profit foundation in the UK and US “to help students, artists and those in need here and in the developing world, so that his commitment to highlighting the truth and humanitarianism will continue.” Information is available on timhetherington.org.

Hondros’s fiancée, Christine Piaia, and his friends and colleagues at Getty Images set up The Chris Hondros Fund to support aspiring photographers and raise public awareness about the contributions of photojournalists: www.chrishondrosfund.org.

The first of the Chris Hondros scholarships was given last fall at the Eddie Adams Workshop (which Hondros had attended) to photographer Enrico Fabian. At the same ceremony,  the Tim Hetherington Memorial Award was given to photographer Dominic Bracco II.

The first Tim Hetherington Grant, administered by Human Rights Watch and World Press Photo, was awarded last year to Stephen Ferry to support his long-term documentary project on the effects of the guerilla war in Colombia.

In more recent news, the first session of the Reporters Instructed in Saving Colleagues (RISC), a free first-aid course for journalists covering conflict, began in New York City this week.  The program was started by Hetherington’s friend and frequent collaborator, writer Sebastian Junger. Supported with donations from ABC News, National Geographic, Vanity Fair, Condé Nast, Getty Images and the Chris Hondros Fund, RISC training programs will also be held in London and Beirut. (Information can be found at  risctraining.org/)

The goal of the program is to train more journalists so that, if needed, they could help colleagues injured in the field.

Helping journalists help journalists: That seems like a fitting tribute as we remember two colleagues who gave so much to their community. Of course, we’ll still be thinking of them, and all who mourn for them, long after this one-year milestone has passed.

Related Articles:
Hondros, Hetherington Prizes Awarded at Eddie Adams Workshop

Hetherington, Hondros Loved Ones Choose Memorial Charities


Stephen Ferry Wins First Tim Hetherington Grant

Free Conflict-Training Course Now Accepting Applications

http://pdnpulse.pdnonline.com/2012/03/free-conflict-training-course-now-accepting-applications.html

Chris Hondros and Tim Hetherington: A Reflection

March 29th, 2012

Free Conflict-Training Course Now Accepting Applications

Photojournalists covering conflict zones can now apply for Reporters Instructed in Saving Colleagues (RISC) training. RISC, which was founded by journalist and author Sebastian Junger, currently has courses scheduled for New York City in April 2012, London in fall 2012 and Beirut in winter 2012/2013. Each three-day workshop focuses on teaching attendees crucial combat medical skills.

Junger was a friend of the late photojournalist Tim Hetherington, with whom he collaborated on the documentary Restrepo. He started RISC after he learned that Hetherington, who was killed by a mortar in Misrata, Libya, last year, could have survived his injuries if someone on the ground with him knew basic lifesaving techniques.

“Combat photographers like Chris Hondros and Tim Hetherington regularly take chances that many writers wouldn’t dream of, and as a result they suffer a disproportionate number of casualties,” Junger says. “RISC is an attempt to train freelancers in battlefield medicine and equip them with combat medical packs so that they can render aid immediately and effectively. The industry has gone far too long without providing any medical training for the people—mostly freelance photographers—who run most of the risks.”

Most conflict-training courses can be costly. However, applicants accepted into RISC courses are only required to pay for their own travel and food expenses. Housing and workshop costs are covered with funds raised by RISC. Many media organizations have donated funding for the first round of workshops, including ABC News, National Geographic, Vanity Fair and Condé Nast, and Getty Images.

The first workshop takes place in New York City April 18 through 20, which is the one-year anniversary of Hetherington’s death. At the time of this writing, all but three of the 24 spots were filled, with eight people on the waiting list. Applicants were chosen based on the amount of time they’ve spent in conflict zones. RISC’s mission is to train experienced conflict reporters, photojournalists and other members of the media who will use the medical skills on future assignments. The workshops do not include hostile environment training, such as preparation for loud noises, surprise attacks or mitigating personal risk.

Though the dates aren’t set for the London and Beirut workshops, RISC has already received applications for both cities (42 and 15, respectively). Regardless, the organization encourages journalists to continue to apply since it plans on holding courses once a year in all three cities.

Go to risctraining.org to apply for workshops and get more information.

Related Articles:

Survival Training for Conflict Zones
What to Expect if You’re Injured on Assignment
In Case of Emergency: Recommended Practices for Notifications
Chris Hondros and Tim Hetherington: A Reflection

October 20th, 2011

Chris Hondros Fund Announces Fellowships, Grants, New Web Site

The Chris Hondros Fund, a non-profit established by the late photojournalist’s fiance, Christina Piaia, with support from the Hondros Family, announced the launch of the Fund Web site today. Hondros was killed earlier this year in a rocket attack by Qaddafi forces in Misrata, Libya. The Fund, which will “support and advance photojournalists” also announced the establishment of fellowships and grantmaking activities.

Getty Images director of photography Pancho Bernasconi, and New York Times photographer Todd Heisler have joined Piaia on the board of directors for the Fund.

The Fund recently awarded it’s first fellowship at this year’s Eddie Adams Workshop to Enrico Fabian.

Their programs and goals were outlined in a press release as follows:

Fellowships

Chris Hondros Fellowship in Photojournalism: Each year, the Fund will select an outstanding photojournalist who is committed to creating a visual history that brings shared human experiences into the public eye and whose work shows exceptional promise to receive a fellowship for the study of photojournalism. The Fund anticipates soliciting the first round of applications in 2012.

Hondros Fellow at Eddie Adams Workshop: The Fund will award an annual fellowship to one of the attendees of the Eddie Adams Workshop based on the photography created during the workshop and a portfolio review. Recipients should demonstrate a commitment to documenting a visual history of newsworthy events in the “spirit” of Chris Hondros; his imagery, and continuous drive to tell a story always made his work compelling and the successful recipient of the fellowship will share and demonstrate a similar vision and approach. Hondros attended the Workshop as a student in 1993, and returned as a team leader in 2007. On October 10, 2011, Enrico Fabian received the first Hondros Fellow award based on his powerful body of work created during the workshop, his telling portfolio and unyielding commitment to photojournalism.

Grantmaking

The Fund will provide grants to non-profit organizations and academic institutions to support projects that advance the work of aspiring photojournalists and working photojournalists and to protect and assist journalists whose work demonstrates the Fund’s mission: to create a visual history that brings shared human experiences into the public eye. These grants may also assist in raising public awareness of the effects of conflict on civilians, combatants, and society. The Fund plans to work with select organizations to develop appropriate projects and will not initially accept unsolicited proposals.

Awareness

The Fund seeks to raise awareness and educate the public about the work of photojournalists, which the Fund anticipates will include operating a lecture series, curating and promoting exhibitions, and providing direct support, in the form of fellowships and awards, to photojournalists.

Related: Hondros, Hetherington Prizes Awarded at Eddie Adams Workshop

October 12th, 2011

Hondros, Hetherington Prizes Awarded at Eddie Adams Workshop

Among the awards given out at the 24th annual Eddie Adams Workshop, held October 7 through 10 in Jeffersonville, New York, were two prizes created in memory of photographers Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros, who were killed in Misrata, Libya on April 20, 2011.

The Chris Hondros Fund, created after his death to support young photojournalists, gave a $2500 prize and a print to Workshop attendee Enrico Fabian.  The Tim Hetherington Memorial Award, a $2,000 prize, was given to Dominic Bracco II. The prize was funded by a collection taken at a gathering of Hetherington’s friends and colleagues held at New York’s Bubble Lounge days after his death.

Each year, the intensive, four-day Workshop ends with a memorial to photojournalist Eddie Adams, the Workshop’s founder, and six of his Vietnam-era colleagues who were killed covering war. This year, the memorial was made more poignant with the addition of tributes to Hondros and Hetherington.

Hondros, a 1993 Workshop alumnus, was remembered with a screening of short interview excerpts from the 2007 documentary In Service: Pittsburgh to Iraq. In one segment, Hondros, who had covered the Iraq war for Getty Images, spoke about the gap between American and Iraqi culture, saying, “Our government is infatuated with Iraq but our people are not.”

Jamie Wellford, international photo editor at Newsweek, told the audience that Hetherington had been looking forward to attending this year’s Workshop. On the day he died, Hetherington had emailed Wellford, but he didn’t receive it until after Hetherington’s death, because it  “spent a week in digital purgatory.” Wellford introduced a screening of Hetherington’s 19-minute film Diary. Made in 2010, it is a kaleidoscopic, deeply personal compilation of footage showing Hetherington’s view of his life as a war photographer.

Among the other prizes given out during the Workshop to Barnstorm participants:

The Colton Family Award, for the student who best embodies the spirit of the workshop, a $1000 Award and a spot on the Black team at next year’s Workshop:
Scott Mcintyre

$1000 Cash Awards From National Geographic (two):
Kiana Hayeri And Arthur Bondar

$500 Awards From LIFE Magazine (Two):
Gregory Gieske, David Maurice Smith

Assignments from Newsweek, People, Sports Illustrated, Esquire Digital, AARP and AARP Bulletin, AP, Getty Images, The Los Angeles, The New York Times, Wall Street Journal and other newspapers and publications were also given out. Additional awards of services or gift certificates were offered by Altpick, B& H Photo, Mac Group and PDN.

A full list of 2011 participants is available on  www.eddieadamsworkshop.com.

–with reporting by Jill Waterman

May 4th, 2011

Hetherington, Hondros Loved Ones Choose Memorial Charities

The family of photographer Tim Hetherington, who was killed in Libya on April 20 in an attack by pro-Qaddafi forces, has chosen three charities where donations should be made in  his memory. They represent work Hetherington supported throughout his career:

Human Rights Watch, the independent organization dedicated to defending and protecting human rights, for which Hetherington worked often.:  www.hrw.org

Committee to Protect Journalists: www.cpj.org

Milton Margai School for the Blind in Sierra Leone, a school where Hetherington photographed and worked with students, who had been intentionally blinded by the Revolutionary United Force:  www.miltonmargaischool.org

The family has invited friends and colleagues to a funeral May 13 in London. No public announcement has been made of a memorial in the New York area, where Hetherington lived.

The fiancee of photographer Chris Hondros, also killed in Misrata on April 20th, has formalized plans for a fund in memory of Hondros that will support aspiring photojournalists.  Christine Piaia has set up The Chris Hondos Funf and is now working with financial advisors at Davis Wright Tremaine in New York. Says Piaia, “We are setting up this fund to honor Chris’ memory, protect his colleagues in war-torn areas, and help aspiring journalists and photographers cover these events.”

Contributions may be sent to The Chris Hondros Fund, c/o Getty Images, 75 Varick St., 5th Floor, New York, NY 10013.

April 27th, 2011

Chris Hondros Remembered as Humanist, Friend

An estimated 800 mourners attended the April 27 memorial service for photographer Chris Hondros. The service was held at the Sacred Hearts St. Stephens Church in Brooklyn, where Hondros and his fiancée had planned to hold their wedding this August.  Hondros died in Misrata, Libya on April 20, in a mortar attack that also killed photographer Tim Hetherington.

Hetherington was remembered in prayers offered during the service. Prayers were also offered for “those courageous and steadfast journalists and photographers working in the field today, shining the light of truth on the world,” as well as for “those who live and die with violence and war each day.”

The music of the service, performed by the Brooklyn Rider quartet as well as two church organists, a violinist and trumpet player, included selections by Mahler, Schubert and Bach.  Reporter Regis Le Sommier of Paris Match, who had worked with Hondros in Afghanistan and on many other news stories, noted in his eulogy that Hondros so loved classical music that he had listened to Bach’s Goldberg Variations while waiting out a hurricane in Texas.

In his homily, Father Anthony J. Sansone described Hondros as a “prophetic humanist.” Sansone, who had recently counseled Hondros and his fiancée, Christina Piaia, in preparation for their wedding, said Hondros worked to document “the suffering and the heartbroken” out of a sense of conscience and a commitment to making the public aware of perspectives beyond their own.

Writer Greg Campbell, who had known Hondros since he was 14, said he had received words of condolence from people in 24 countries, including old friends as well as people who only knew Hondros from his photos. He noted that Hondros would have encouraged his friends to maintain the connections and relationships that have formed in what Campbell called “this dark week.” Pancho Bernasconi of Getty Images, who said he liked to call Hondros “my photographer,” said the award-winning photojournalist is remembered as “that rare friend” who offered encouragement and comfort at the worst of times.

Speaking in a clear, calm voice, Piaia noted that on at a recent visit to the church, Hondros had looked out over the pews and talked about how many people they would need to invite to their wedding. Piaia told the standing-room only crowd,  “Now every seat is occupied, every row is filled, but we are celebrating something more profound:  the life of our friend Chris.” Hondros taught her “life is fragile,” she said, adding, “We didn’t take each other for granted.” She told the mourners she did not want them to feel sad, but to know “how fulfilled we have been in the last year.”

At the end of the service, pallbearers Todd Heisler, Tyler Hicks, John Moore, Jeff Swensen, Joe Raedle, Andreas Gebhard, Spencer Platt and Pierce Wright carried the coffin outside, as the church bell tolled 41 times for every year of Hondros’s life.

Related story:

Chris Hondros Dies of Injuries in Libya

Tim Hetherington Killed in Libya