August 26th, 2014

Upcoming Grant Deadlines for Emerging Photographers, Photojournalists and First Photo Books

Cover of "Legendary: Inside the House Ballroom Scene" by 2013 CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography winner Gerard H. Gaskin. Published by Duke University Press, 2013.

Cover of “Legendary: Inside the House Ballroom Scene” by 2013 CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography winner Gerard H. Gaskin. Published by Duke University Press, 2013.

Three major photography grants have rapidly approaching deadlines in early September: burn magazine’s Emerging Photographer Fund; the First Book Prize in Photography, offered by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and the Honickman Foundation in Philadelphia; and the Carmignac Foundation’s Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award.

Burn magazine—curated by Magnum photographer David Alan Harvey—has extended the deadline for their annual award to 6:00 p.m. EDT September 2, 2014. The grant supports the continuation of a personal project, whether journalistic or artistic, and is funded by anonymous donors. This year’s jurors will include The New York Times’ Lens Blog’s James Estrin and the photojournalist Donna Ferrato.

The competition is open to emerging photographers of any age, and the entry fee is $25. The major prize is $10,000; several smaller, minor prizes have been awarded in recent years. Four grants were awarded in 2013—one major to Diana Markosian for her essay ‘My Father The Stranger,’ and three minors, to Iveta Vaivode for her essay “Somewhere on Disappearing Path,” Oksana Yushko for her essay “Balaklava: The Lost History” and Maciej Pisuk for his essay “Under The Skin. Photographs From Brzeska Street.” To enter, visit burnmagazine.org.

The First Book Prize in Photography is a biennial grant offered to North American photographers who have yet to publish a book-length photo project, and “use their cameras for creative exploration” to make work that is “visually compelling, that bears witness and that has integrity of purpose.” Past judges include Robert Adams, Maria Morris Hambourg, Robert Frank, Mary Ellen Mark, William Eggleston and Deborah Willis. Past winners include Gerald H. Gaskin, for his book Legendary: Inside the House Ballroom Scene, and Jannette Williams for The Bathers.

The prize includes $3,000, publication of a photo book, inclusion in a website showcasing finalists and a solo exhibition at the Archive of Documentary Arts in Duke’s Rubenstein Library. Entrants must submit 40 photos with captions, a one-page artist statement, a one-page CV and $70 by 11:59 pm, September 15.

This year, Joshua Chuang—chief curator of the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona—will confer with a selection committee of accomplished photographers, editors and publishers to choose between 12 and 20 finalists, who will then be asked to submit ten sample prints by December 1, 2014. Sandra S. Philips, senior curator of photography at SFMOMA, will review the finalists, select the winner, and write the introduction to the winner’s published book. To enter, visit firstbookprizephoto.com.

The Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award is a competition begun in 2009 to support and promote investigative photography. The Carmignac Foundation hopes to bring light to areas and issues that have not yet captured the world’s attention, but are nonetheless crucial to geopolitics and global freedom of speech and human rights. This year’s theme is “Lawless Areas in France,” focusing on “political, legal or socio-economic no man’s land subject to deregulation—where the authority of the French Republic is challenged.”

Funding in-depth photographic reportage, this year’s prize includes €50,000, financing for a monograph, a touring exhibition through France, Italy, Germany and the U.K. and a guaranteed purchase of four prints by the foundation from the winning photographer. A preselection committee will shortlist between ten and 15 candidates, who will be sent to a jury that will convene in Paris on October 30. The deadline to apply is midnight, GMT, September 28, 2014; the name of the winning candidate will be kept confidential (for security reasons, according to Carmignac) until July 2015. To enter, apply online here.

February 1st, 2013

Project on African American and Latino Ballroom Subculture Wins CDS/Honickman First Book Prize

© Gerard H. Gaskin

© Gerard H. Gaskin

Gerard H. Gaskin’s photography series on the African American and Latino house and ballroom subculture of urban, gay pageants has received the Center for Documentary Studies/Honickman First Book Prize.

The prize carries a $3,000 grant, and an opportunity to publish a book of the work and exhibit it online and at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. The images also go into the permanent collection at Duke’s Archive of Documentary Arts.

Judged by curator, historian and photographer Deborah Willis, the 2013 prize is the sixth biennial award given by Duke Center For Documentary Studies and the Honickman Foundation of Philadelphia.

According to Gaskin’ statement, “The balls are a celebration of black and Latino urban gay life and were born in Harlem out of a need for black and Latino gays to have a safe space to express themselves. Balls are constructed like beauty and talent pageants. The participants work to redefine and critique gender and sexual identity through an extravagant fashion masquerade.”

Though the balls originated in Harlem, Gaskin noted, the culture has grown and spread. He made his images in New York, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. “My images try to show a personal and intimate beauty, pride, dignity, courage, and grace that have been painfully challenged by mainstream society,” he says.

“Gaskin’s work looks at the notion of transformation as he turns his lens on what it means to be ‘desired,’ and at the same time, what it feels like to be alienated,” Willis said in a statement. “His photographs are as exciting to look at as they are a means for imagining the lived experiences of the communities he has documented.”

The prize is open to American and Canadian photographers of any age who have never published a book-length work. For more about the prize visit: firstbookprizephoto.com.

May 21st, 2012

Curator Deborah Willis to Judge 2012 CDS/Honickman First Book Prize

Photo historian, professor and curator Deborah Willis will be the judge for this year’s CDS/Honickman First Book Prize, sponsored by The Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) at Duke University and The Honickman Foundation. The winning photographer will receive a $3,000 grant and publication of a book of photographs, an exhibition at the Rubenstein Library Gallery at Duke University and inclusion in a Web site devoted to past winners of the award. American and Canadian photographers who have never published a book-length work before are eligible to enter. Applications will be accepted from June 15 through September 15.

Submissions to the First Book Prize are first screened by a committee lead this year by Kimerly Rorshach, director of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke. According to the FAQs on the First Book Prize Web site, the focus of the competition is on “the breadth and nuance of the body of photographs as an extended narrative and meditation.” The committee’s selection is then turned over to this year’s judge.

Willis is on the faculty of the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University and has published such books as Reflections in Black: A History of Black Photographers, 1840 to the Present; Posing Beauty: African American Images from the 1890s to the Present; The Black Female Body in Photography; and Obama: The Historic Campaign in Photographs. Previous judges for the First Book Prize include photographers Robert Frank, William Eggleston and Mary Ellen Mark.

Past winners of the prize have included Benjamin Lowy, Jennette Williams, Danny Wilcox Frazier, and Larry Schwarm.

Guidelines for entries can be found at the First Book Prize web site.