February 1st, 2016

Canon’s EOS 1D X Mark II Records 4K, Shoots 14 FPS

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Canon pulled back the curtain on its newest high-end DSLR, the 1D X Mark II, and while we’ll resist invoking Top Gun, speed is unquestionably the hallmark of the new full frame flagship.

The 1D X Mark II will deliver several major upgrades from the older model, including internal 4K video recording at up to 60p, a burst mode of up to 14 fps with AF engaged and a higher resolution image sensor.

Canon’s new flagship will boasts a new 20.2 megapixel full frame CMOS sensor with a native ISO range of 100 – 51,200 with expansion options for 50 and 409,600 available. A pair of DIGIC 6+ image processors give the camera some serious speed–the 1D X Mark II clocks in at up to 14 fps with AF engaged and up to 16fps in live view mode when shooting to the camera’s CFast memory card (there’s also a card slot for CompactFlash cards). When shooting in JPEG, the camera will keep bursting until you run out of memory space on your card. Switch to RAW, and you’ll be able to save up to 170 frames using CFast memory cards or 73 using a UDMA 7 class CF card.

As for video, Canon will deliver in-camera 4K recording (496 x 2160) at 60 fps in camera when recording to CFast. Full HD frame rates will top off at a motion-slowing 120 fps. There’s a built-in headphone jack for audio monitoring and a new 4K frame grab feature that lets you isolate 8.8-megapixel still images from your 4K video in the camera.

You’ll also find the company’s Dual Pixel CMOS AF system for continuous autofocusing during video recording. The 1D X Mark II will have a 3.2-inch touch screen display with touch-focusing capability, too, so you can touch a portion of the display during video recording to quickly change the focus point.

Speaking of autofocus, the 1D X Mark II has a new 61-point AF system with 41 cross-type points. All the AF points are selectable and supported to f/8. Canon said its tweaked its algorithms to deliver better accuracy in Servo (or continuous) mode and the AF points will now stay red in the camera’s viewfinder to better assist in composition.

The 1D X Mark II will have an internal digital lens optimizer feature that lets you fix optical aberrations in camera, rather than in software.

 

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Additional features include:

  • weather-resistant build
  • built-in GPS
  • AF sensitivity in low light is now available down to EV -3 at the center AF point when the camera is set to One-Shot AF
  • 360,000-pixel RGB+IR metering sensor

There’s no built-in Wi-Fi, but the camera will work with the optional Wireless File Transmitter (WFT-E8) to enjoy 802.11ac speeds when sending images and videos to connected devices.

The 1D X Mark II body will sell for $5,999 and be available in April. It is available for pre-order now. Canon will also bundle a CFast card and card reader in a Premium Kit for $6,299.

Read More:

See how the 1D X Mark II compares to Nikon’s D5

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January 5th, 2016

Here’s What Canon Brought to CES 2016

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Canon’s CES slate was a mostly consumer-oriented affair, with several low-cost ultra-zoom PowerShots introduced alongside a new HD video camera.

The PowerShot SX540 HS boasts a 50x optical zoom lens (equivalent to 24-1200mm) with optical image stabilization and a new 20.3-megapixel CMOS sensor. It incorporates a DIGIC 6 processor, a 3-inch display, Wi-Fi and NFC. Video recording is available at resolutions up to 1920x1080p60.

A new Story Highlights feature automatically builds a highlight reel of your images in-camera. A Hybrid Auto mode records a short video clip before each still photo and compiles them together to make a short highlight reel.

The PowerShot SX540 HS will ship in March for $400.

If you need a bit less reach, the PowerShot SX410 IS offers a 42x optical zoom lens (equivalent to 24-1008mm) with image stabilization and a 20-megapixel sensor.

The camera features Canon’s DIGIC 4+ processor, Wi-Fi and NFC plus 720p video recording and a 3-inch display. It ships in February for $300.

HR_VIXIA_HF_G40_3Q_CLThe VIXIA HF G40 video camera records 1080p60 in either MP4 or AVCHD formats and features a built-in 20x zoom lens.

It features:
* an HD CMOS PRO Image Sensor
* the same DIGIC DV 4 Image processor used in Canon’s XA35 and XA30 pro video cameras
* five axis image stabilization system with a dynamic mode to reduce distortion while walking
* a 3.5–inch OLED touch panel screen
* a tilting EVF , user-friendly, high resolution color Electronic View Finder (EVF).
* Zebra stripes, color bars and test tone
* focus peaking
* two SD card slots
* 1200x slow motion recording
* custom function buttons

Canon has also added new Looks settings, including Highlight Priority which delivers an HDR effect, and a Wide DR Gamma mode that boosts the dynamic range to 600 percent compared to the 300 percent on its predecessor. Both modes will help videographers reclaim details ordinarily lost to over or under-exposure.

The HF G40 will ship in February for $1,399.

The company will also add three new consumer camcorders in its Vixia RF lineup and reaffirmed its commitment to low cost, compact digital cameras, unveiling several new Digital Elphs. You can read about them here.

Follow PDN’s CES 2016 coverage here.

December 17th, 2015

Prints Under Pressure: Lindsay Adler’s Whirlwind Live Shoot

Presented by Canon

The dissemination of photography online has plenty of advantages, and the ability to visually communicate without barriers on the Web has become a monumental boon for contemporary photographers. But for fashion and beauty photographer Lindsay Adler, who does attribute much of her success to her online reach, printing her work still makes an impact unrivaled by any touchscreen.

On her blog, Adler writes: “[In person], viewers take their time exploring the image, appreciating the detail and interacting with art you’ve created. Seeing your images in print feels like taking the image to its final conclusion.”

Adler’s quote comes from her blog post about a live shoot, gallery show and panel she participated in earlier this fall, hosted by Canon. Adler’s vivid work was a perfect fit for the event, titled Behind The Print: A Look Inside A Photographer’s Obsession, which celebrated Canon’s launch of the imagePROGRAF PRO-1000 printer. The two-day whirlwind event included a combined 24 hours of production, culminating in a 1.5-hour shoot in front of a live audience. Portrait photographer Joel Grimes and sports photographer David Bergman were also on set conducting their own shoots in front of the audience. Adler, who is comfortable working with big sets and multiple concepts, took on the project.

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A final image from the first live-shoot setup. Photo © Lindsay Adler

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The Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-1000 turning out Adler’s prints. Photo courtesy of Lindsay Adler

In an interview with Adler, she says, “I love clean, bold and graphic imagery that demand viewers’ attention. That’s what I aimed to create while showing the Pro-1000’s ability to show rich and saturated colors, shadow detail and fine detail.” After pitching different mood boards to Canon, Adler assembled her team, including hair and makeup artist Griselle Rosario, styling teams 4 Season Style Management and Ivie Joy Flowers and retoucher Tetyana Mykhalska.

In a typical shoot, Adler says she budgets several hours per shot to get the lighting, posing and concept right. For this event, she created 13 different looks over two 12-hour sessions. Then came the live shoot, for which hundreds of people were ushered in to watch Adler, Bergman and Grimes each construct sets, shoot and print work in less than two hours. Adler, who created two sets—one with an elaborate floral wall and one all-red-everything motif—had no room for error. Lighting, posing, image selection, retouching and printing all had to be achieved within the time frame.

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Behind the scenes of the first live-shoot setup. Photo courtesy of Lindsay Adler

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Behind the scenes of the second live-shoot setup. Photo courtesy of Lindsay Adler

“This event was as far opposite of [typical] conditions as possible,” she says. But the purpose it served was unique: viewers were invited to view all of the moving parts that go into a shoot from inception to print. The on-the-fly choices made by Adler and her team were accessible to the audience, highlighting the obsessive attention to detail that goes into production, right up to the prints made by the equally detail-oriented PRO-1000.

Communication was the foundation for this type of shoot. “If I failed to communicate concepts or ideas, the shot would have fallen flat—and we would have lost a lot of time trying to salvage it,” she explains. Adler recommends practice, practice, practice for shoots with little time and lots of pressure. Her mood board, which included inspiration for hair, makeup, wardrobe and lighting, became the shoot’s blueprint, keeping everyone visually on the same page.

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Lindsay Adler and her team on set selecting images for print. Photo courtesy of Lindsday Adler

No matter how much a photographer plans for a shoot, though, technology can sometimes throw a wrench into the works. But the PRO-1000, the final step in Adler’s shoot, kept humming along and making true-to-color prints. “I didn’t need to worry about the limitations of the printer,” Adler says. “I knew that if I captured rich colors, the printer would show them. If I wanted high contrast while maintaining details in the black—no problem.” And there was never a bottleneck, she says, calling the speed “lightning fast.”

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A final image from the second live-shoot setup. Photo © Lindsay Adler

Seeing her work hung on the gallery walls gave both the audience—and Adler—more appreciation for the level of detail she put in. And while she believes that social media is still an “incredibly powerful tool” for sharing her work, printing her photographs does justice to her meticulousness. “The two processes together—sharing images [online] and printing your favorite shots,” she explains, “are a powerful approach to appreciating and sharing your vision.”

October 21st, 2015

Canon Intros imagePROGRAF PRO-1000 Inkjet Printer

imagePROGRAF PRO-1000 _ With EOS CameraCanon has pulled back the curtain on the new imagePROGRAF PRO-1000 large format inkjet photo printer at PhotoPlus Expo 2015.

The PRO-1000 features a 17-inch print width and a new print head, inkset and imaging processing engine. It’s a successor to the Pixma Pro-1.

First, the print head. It’s 50 percent larger than the Pixma Pro-1, with more nozzles too (18,432 for each of the 12 channels.) Canon says the larger heads boost print speeds while maintaining high resolutions. The head also uses a real-time ink ejection system which helps to maintain a consistent print head temperature to limit clogging. The PRO-1000 will also better cope with ink clogs when they do happen thanks to a built-in sensor that checks for clogs and then automatically boosts the pressure on the remaining nozzles to maintain print quality and speed. When the print is finished, the print head will clear the clog.

The PRO-1000 accepts the new LUCIA PRO 11-color pigmented ink system with a Chroma Optimizer that delivers a 19 percent larger color gamut than the Pro-1. The inks deliver an L value of 1.5, according to Canon, and will be sold in 80ml tanks. There’s automatic switching between photo and matte black inks.

The printer features a two-way vacuum paper feeder to keep media flat and even. It accepts cut sheet media up to 17 x 22 inches and fine art media up to 0.7mm thick. There’s also a built-in densitometer for calibration. According to Canon, the calibration is sensitive enough to ensure color consistency between two PRO-1000 models of under a Delta E of 2 when printing on Canon media.

Among the new software available for the printer is an Accounting Manager, which helps users keep track of consumable costs such as ink and media. Users can manually enter the cost of ink and paper to determine print margins and analyze print-related expenditures.  Canon says the program won’t actually be ready to ship with the printer, but will be available in Q1, 2016.

Rounding out the feature set, you’ll enjoy Wi-Fi connectivity and Apple AirPrint compatibility.

The imagePROGRAF PRO-1000 ships at the end of the month for $1,300 and is available for pre-order now. The 80ml ink cartridges cost $60 while the Chroma Optimizer will set you back $55.

imagePROGRAF PRO-1000 _ View of Ink

September 10th, 2015

5 of the Coolest Things We Saw at Canon Expo

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Canon gave visitors a unique opportunity to preview some of the technologies it’s currently working to perfect at its Expo, which opened its three-day stint in New York yesterday. Some of the most intriguing prototypes Canon had to show—including a 120-megapixel DSLR, an 8K video camera and 250-megapixel sensor—were announced before the Expo even kicked off. Still, we were able to catch a glimpse at a few other interesting products and technologies under development. Here’s what caught our eye.

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600mm f/1.4 L Lens

Canon revealed that it’s working on a 600mm lens that will incorporate the new BR optics first introduced in the recently announced 35mm f/1.4 lens. Thanks to a combination of BR and DO (diffractive optics) elements, the new 600mm should be about 30 percent lighter than its predecessor. No other details were available.

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Virtual Reality

Canon also showed off a virtual reality headset and 360-degree camera solution for creating virtual reality presentations. Unlike current VR headsets which strap around a user’s head, Canon’s prototype is held up to the face. The display has a 120-degree viewing angle and features two 5×5-inch screens with a resolution of 2560×2880. The omnidirectional camera system combines 24 Vixia mini X camcorders into an array that can record spherical video.

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Smart Home of the Future

Somewhere between a Microsoft PixelSense Table and Minority Report, Canon displayed an interactive table that lets users engage with their photos in novel ways. Using a combination of sensors in the table and IR and other cameras mounted above, any camera placed on the table can have its images instantly displayed across the table’s surface. Users can swipe and pull images to get a better look, flick them across the table toward a TV where they are instantly displayed or drag them to a printer icon where they are made into tangible prints. The table can also bring analog images to life. A Canon rep placed a photo book on the table and the system scanned the images and pulled additional photos with similar tags down from a cloud library to display on the table (more pictures below).

It's hard to tell from this image, but the runner's body is raised about 1-inch or more from the media.

It’s hard to tell from this image, but the runner’s body is raised about 1-inch or more from the media.

Textured Printing

While photo printing on a variety of unique surfaces and substrates is not new, Canon is pushing to give prints a variety of different textures—like glass, wood, leather, snakeskin and more—through a dimensional printing process. The process creates photo prints up to 2-inches thick off the page using a UV curable inkjet press, layered ink and gloss coatings. Canon is already selling a version of textured printing to some of its commercial partners but the process under development will support more textures and greater depths. To our eyes, portraits printed dimensionally didn’t look quite as compelling as abstract patterns or objects like bricks and wood, which also felt startlingly close to the real thing.

Speaking of printers, Canon is also finalizing new photo inkjet printers in 17-, 24- and 44-inch sizes. They’ll use a new 12 pigment ink system, but no other details were available.

In this demo, Canon is recording four 4K streams from its 8K camera, passing it through a debayer box and sending four 4K quadrants into individual external recorders. To construct the 8K footage, the files from each external recorder must be merged in post production.

In this demo, Canon is recording four 4K streams from its 8K camera (which looks like its C300), passing it through a debayer box and sending four 4K quadrants into individual external recorders. To construct the 8K footage, the files from each external recorder must be merged in post production.

8K & HDR

Attendees were treated to a glimpse of 8K video on several displays—from a large movie projection to new 8K reference monitors still in the prototype stage. The footage was recorded with Canon’s new 8K image sensor, which was announced earlier this week. The 8K sensor can produce 35-megapixel still frame grabs from video files and offers 13 stops of dynamic range. As for data rates, 10 minutes of RAW 4K footage off the sensor generates 4TB of data, a Canon spokesperson said.

On prototype 8K reference monitors, the pictures were so sharp that even standing directly in front of the display with our eyes hovering mere inches from the screen and using a magnifying glass, the images looked crystalline and ultra-realistic with no hint of pixelation. The display in question had a pixel density of 300 ppi, which Canon said is about the limit a human eye can even resolve. From a normal viewing distance however, the 8K footage didn’t look noticeably different than 4K.

What was noticeably different from a distance was a high-dynamic range display. Canon showed off a prototype display capable of brightness levels of 2,000 nits. By contrast, the average display delivers roughly 200 nits and the next-generation high dynamic range 4K TVs will achieve between 600-1,000 nits, depending on the model and manufacturer. Using an HDR monitor, users will be able to see more of the image data recorded by today’s high dynamic range cameras.

Here’s a closer look at some of the technology Canon was demoing:

Canon's Smart Home concept. The smart table can use a picture frame to crop digital images.

Canon’s Smart Home concept. The smart table can use a picture frame to crop digital images.

An analog photo book comes to live as similarly tagged images and videos are pulled down from the cloud to the smart table.

An analog photo book comes to life as similarly tagged images and videos are pulled down from the cloud to the smart table.

Mounted above the smart table, a series of cameras and sensors track hand movements and more.

Mounted above the smart table, a series of cameras and sensors track hand movements and more.

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Canon’s spherical image capture solution combines 24 Vixia mini X cameras.

Canon looks poised to refresh its professional inkjet printers. Three models, including this 17-inch mockup, were displayed at the Expo.

Canon looks poised to refresh its professional inkjet printers. Three models, including this 17-inch mockup, were displayed at the Expo.

By layering on the ink and gloss, Canon can create dimensional prints with textures that feel like the real thing.

By layering on the ink and gloss, Canon can create dimensional prints with textures that feel like the real thing.

With textured printing, you can feel the wrinkles and scars of a long life. If you're into that kind of thing.

With textured printing, you can feel the wrinkles and scars of a long life. If you’re into that kind of thing.

September 8th, 2015

Canon Pumps the Pixels in Product Prototypes

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A 250-megapixel prototype with EF mount.

If you thought Canon’s 50-megapixel 5DS and 5DS R were the company’s last word on pixel-packed sensors, think again. The company announced that it has built a 250-megapixel APS-H-sized sensor that can read the letters off an airplane up to 18Km away. It’s also built a 120-megapixel DSLR with an EF mount. Oh, and an 8K video camera.

The announcements were technology previews–Canon won’t be shipping a 120-megapixel DSLR or 8K video camera just yet. Still, they are a glimpse of where the company is headed. Here’s what we know:

* A 120-megapixel DSLR with EF mount: Canon says that the “high-resolution images that the camera will be capable of producing will recreate the three-dimensional texture, feel and presence of subjects, making them appear as if they are really before one’s eyes.” RAW files will measure in at 232MB. Memory card company stocks will skyrocket.

*An 8K video camera: According to Canon, this Super 35 mm-equivalent CMOS sensor will record 8,192 x 4,320 resolution video, or 35-megapixels. It will deliver frame rates up to 60 fps with 13 stops of dynamic range. The camera body will have an EF mount and Canon says that 78 out of 96 EF lenses in its current lineup will be compatible with the 8K camera.

* A 250-megapixel APS-H-sized sensor: This one is really aimed at commercial applications like surveillance cameras. Despite the plentiful pixels, Canon said it’s still capable of shooting at 5 fps. The video off the sensor would deliver resolution that’s 30x that of a 4K camera. Canon said it aimed this beast of a sensor at a plane in flight 18Km away and was still able to distinguish the lettering.

 

February 5th, 2015

Canon 5Ds Takes Aim at Medium Format with 50-Megapixel Sensor

HR_5DS_5DS_R_COMBINATION_CLAfter making their obligatory appearance on the Internet rumor mill, Canon officially launched the 5Ds and 5Ds R, a pair of high-resolution DSLRs based on the 5D Mark III, in advance of the CP+ Show in Japan.

The new 5Ds and 5Ds R will have mostly the same build and feature set as the 5D Mark III but will use a 50-megapixel full frame CMOS sensor of Canon’s own design. The 5Ds R will have a low pass filter cancellation affect to soak up even more resolution (more on that in a minute).

According to Canon, the cameras will offer a 4.14 micron pixel pitch, giving them roughly the same pixel density as the new 7D Mark II. However, the new 5Ds and 5Ds R won’t offer the low light performance of either the 7D Mark II or the 5D Mark III — instead, they’ll top out at a native ISO of 6400, with  a high setting of 12,800 and a low of 50. Canon says that noise levels in the cameras will fall short of the performance of the 5D Mark III or 1-Ds but be comparable to the 7D Mark II, as will the dynamic range.

Powered by a pair of Digic 6 processors, the 5Ds and 5Ds R will offer 5 frames per second continuous shooting as well as 1080p video recording at 30 fps. However, Canon was quick to emphasize that the video capabilities of the new cameras will be sharply limited compared to the 5D Mark III. They won’t offer movie servo AF, clean HDMI output or headphone jacks.

Movie makers won’t be completely neglected however. Canon is debuting a new time-lapse movie mode in these cameras that lets you select how many frames you want in the movie as well as the interval between those frames.

HR_5DS_EF24-70_3Q_CLBoth models will feature a 3-inch display, a CF and SD card slot (with newly added support for UHS-1 cards), and USB 3.o connectivity. Sharpness settings have also been enhanced. Photographers can now adjust sharpness along three specific vectors — strength, fineness and threshold. Automatic white balance has been improved with the addition of ambience or white priority.

As mentioned above, both the 5Ds and 5Ds R will be built from the 5D Mark III’s body with a few subtle tweaks designed primarily to keep the camera as stable as possible during shooting. The mirror will be motor driven, not spring driven, to soften its impact when it moves internally. The mirror lock setting has also been upgraded. In prior Canon cameras, to lock the mirror you had to tap the shutter twice. While that setting is still available, there’s also a menu to set a delayed automatic second shutter. You can designate the interval between when you lock the mirror and when the shutter releases a second time. The ultimate effect, Canon says, is to reduce vibrations when using a tripod.

Finally, the internal chassis, base plate and tripod socket have been reinforced to make the cameras rest more securely on tripods.

The 5Ds R will have a specialized “low pass filter cancellation effect” that increases the apparent sharpness of its images relative to the 5Ds. Canon didn’t ditch the low pass filter entirely, they said, in order to avoid a costly redesign of the camera body. As such, the 5Ds R will be aimed especially at landscape photographers who want a super-sharp image and who don’t shoot repeating patterns as the lack of a low-pass filter will make the 5Ds R more susceptible to moire, Canon warned.

Both models will arrive in June. The 5Ds will retail for $3,699 and is available for pre-order now. The 5Ds R will set you back $3,899 and is also available for pre-order.

Do these strike you as medium format killers? Let us know what you think.

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February 5th, 2015

Canon Rebel T6s and T6i Take Their Place at Top of Rebel Lineup

HR_T6s_EFS18-135_IS_STM_3QFLASH_CLThe Canon Rebel T6s and T6i will join the compay’s three Rebels currently in the lineup as the new top-of-the-line enthusiast models in April.

The new T6s and T6i will share a number of features, including a new APS-C-sized 24.2-megapixel CMOS image sensor and a Digic 6 processor. The cameras will use an updated Hybrid CMOS AF III technology for speedy autofocus in still and video modes that is similar to the Dual Pixel CMOS AF found on its higher-end cameras (such as the revamped Cinema EOS C100 Mark II).

Additional shared features include:

  • A native ISO range of 100-12,800 with an expansion to 25,600
  • An upgraded 7,650 pixel exposure metering sensor
  • A 3-inch, 1.04 million dot, vari-angle touch screen display
  • Faster live view for stills and movies
  • Continuous shooting at 5 fps
  • 1080p video recording at up to 60 fps with clean HDMI output
  • Wi-Fi with NFC
  • Flicker detection to compensate for sodium and mercury vapor light sources
  • Distortion correction for stills and videos
  • Miniature effect now available when shooting movies
  • An Intelligent Viewfinder that overlays camera data on top of the optical viewfinder.
  • A new Color Tone Detection AF mode that scans 19 AF points and identifies objects with skin tones to focus on instead of simply the nearest available object.

The T6s will add a few additional features to its bill of goods, including servo AF during burst mode in live view, an electronic level, and an HDR movie effect. The T6s body will set you back $850 or $1,200 with an 18-135mm lens.

The T6i will retail for $750 for the body, $899 with an 18-55mm lens or $1,100 with  an 18-135mm lens.

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January 5th, 2015

Canon at CES 2015: A Parade of PowerShots

HR_SX710HS_BLACK_3Q_CLCanon introduced a total of five new PowerShot cameras and three new Vixia camcorders at CES 2015.

The PowerShot SX530 HS boasts a 50x optical zoom lens, 16-megapixel image sensor and built-in Wi-Fi and NFC. It uses Canon’s DIGIC 4+ image processor and records 1920x1080p HD video. It ships in February for $430.

The PowerShot SX710 HS is a successor to the SX700 and delivers a 20.3-megapixel sensor paired with a 30x optical zoom lens. It’s capable of recording 1080p HD video at up to 60 frames per second. The camera’s Story Highlights mode can create slideshows with creative transitions automatically in the camera. It’s due next month for $350.

The PowerShot SX 610 HS, for $250, offers an 18x optical zoom, 20-megapixel sensor and Wi-Fi/NFC.

HR_ELPH160_BLACK_3Q_CLRounding out the entry-level of the PowerShot line are a pair of Elph models. The 170 IS features a 20-megapixel sensor, a 12x optical zoom lens and 720p HD video capture. It ships in February for $150 and will be sold in blue, black and silver. The 20-megapixel Elph 160, for $120, features an 8x optical zoom and 720p video recording.

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On the camcorder front, Canon will bring the Vixia HF R series to stores in March.

All three models will share the same 57x (32.5-1853mm) optical zoom lens with optical image stabilization, 3-inch touch screen displays, and a 3.28-megapixel CMOS sensor for recording 1920×1080/60p HD video in either MP4 or AVCHD formats. The Vixia models will also all offer fast and slow motion modes, cinema-style filters, headphone jacks and a Framing Assist mode to recapture focus on a subject during zooming.

The $450 HF R62 offers 32GB of internal flash memory and Wi-Fi/NFC connectivity. The HF R60 will feature 8GB of internal memory plus Wi-Fi/NFC and will retail for $400. Finally, the HF R600 records directly to SD card and won’t offer wireless connectivity. It will retail for $300.

 

November 10th, 2014

Canon’s New 100-400mm Lens Is Steadier Than Ever

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It’s been 16 years since Canon shooters have seen a new 100-400mm EF lens. The wait is now over.

The second generation EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L II USM lens is official and boasts improved image stabilization, giving it four stops of stabilization versus the 1.5 available on the first generation model. Image stabilization is also now tripod sensitive and will be available in three modes: standard, panning and during exposure only.

The lens has been redesigned from the original “push-pull” zoom to a rotating zoom that Canon says will keep the lens steadier and more precise when zooming. The zoom torque adjustment ring has had its own makeover so you can set your zoom tension more easily.

The optical formula has been revamped as well. There is now one Flourite and one Super UD lens element in the lens as well as newly developed Air Sphere Coating to minimize flaring and ghosting.

The new 100-400mm will be able to focus on objects as close as 3.2 feet away.

The lens will offer Flourine coatings on the front and rear surfaces to keep dusty and water from beading on the lens and will feature a weather resistant magnesium housing to keep it safe from the elements.

It will ship with a new lens hood that will feature a slide window for quick access to lens filters, so you don’t have to pop the hood off to adjust your filter. The tripod mount has also been redesigned so that it’s quickly detachable.

The new 100-400mm will hit retail in December carrying a $2,199 price tag.