December 17th, 2013

How About a Holiday Gift That Supports Photography?

It’s not only the season of giving. It’s your last chance to make a tax-deductible donation to a non-profit that you can list on your 2013 tax form. That’s why many of the non-profits that support new photographic work and photographic education are currently seeking support from folks who love photography. Here is a list of some we’ve heard from this holiday season. (Feel free to suggest other deserving non-profits in the comments section.)

If you’re looking for an alternative gift this season, consider a gift that says: We love photography, so let’s support it, too.

The Alexia Foundation
The Alexia Foundation has been making grants to support documentary projects on social change for over 20 years. In 2012, they created the Women’s Initiative Grant, supporting documentary photographic work on issues facing women. The first Women’s Initiative Grant winner, Tim Matsui, has just released a film of his work about the sex trafficking of minors, and the Alexia Foundation hopes to generate support for future grants.
https://www.alexiafoundation.org/donate

Aperture Foundation
Aperture Foundation, publishers of Aperture magazine and many photo books (like the new Emmet Gowin retrospective we raved about), has anchored their winter appeal this year to the news that they’re expanding Aperture’s visual-literacy program for children and teens. Learn more about their new educational program on their Winter Appeal page: http://www.aperture.org/blog/winter-appeal/

Blue Sky Gallery
In addition to hosting 21 solo exhibitions last year, the Portland, Oregon, non-profit also regularly holds artists’ talks that are free and open to the public. If you’re a resident of Oregon, you can match your contribution with a contribution to the Oregon Cultural Trust for a tax credit.
www.blueskygallery.org/who-we-are/about-bluesky/

Light Work
Light Work, the Syracuse, New York, non-profit that supports exhibitions, an artist-in-residency program, workshops and the publication Contact Sheet, is offering Light Work tote bags to anyone who donates $100 (while supplies last). Feeling more beneficent? Light Work offers portfolios for donors giving $1200 and more. www.lightwork.org/shop/donation/

Magnum Foundation
The non-profit Magnum Foundation supports in-depth, documentary photography projects through its Emergency Fund Grant, the Inge Morath Prize to a female photographer under the age of 30, its Human Rights Fellowships at New York University, and its partnerships with human rights and humanitarian aid organizations.  magnumfoundation.org/donate.html

The Aftermath Project
Through its annual grants, The Aftermath Project funds photo projects committed to telling the other side of the story of conflict: “What it takes for individuals to learn to live again, to rebuild destroyed lives and homes” and cope with war’s aftermath. Their  current Kickstarter campaign, to publish the latest volume of their catalogue of grant winners, “War is Only Half the Story,”  has about 48 hours left on the campaign. A pledge to the campaign allows you to pick a reward from a range of prints and gifts. Or, you can simply write The Aftermath Project a check.

February 27th, 2013

Tips for Applying for Fellowships and Competitions: Free Seminar

The W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund and the Aperture Foundation are sponsoring a panel discussion called, “Strategies for Photographers: Thoughts On How To Apply For Fellowships and Other Competitions,” to be held Monday, March 4 at 6:30 p.m. at the Aperture Foundation in New York City. The event will be free and open to the public.

The panelists, all former head jurors for the W. Eugene Smith Grant for Humanistic Photography, will share their experiences judging grants and competitions, including the W. Eugene Smith Grant, World Press Photo, the Getty Images grants, PDN contests and others. The participants are David Friend of Vanity Fair, collector W.M. Hunt, Marcel Saba of Redux Pictures and Lauren Wendle of Photo District News.

The panel will follow the press conference announcing the call for entries to the 2013 W. Eugene Smith Grant. Entries for the competition are due by end of May.

For more information on the panel, or the W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund Grant, visit the W. Eugene Smith Fund website.

Related Articles
Peter van Agtmael Wins $30,000 W. Eugene Smith Fund Grant

Krisanne Johnson Wins 2011 W. Eugene Smith Fund Grant

Anatomy of a Successful Grant Proposal: Krisanne Johnson’s Coming of Age Story

November 16th, 2012

Aperture and Paris Photo Announce First PhotoBook Prize, PhotoBook of the Year

The cover of David Galjaard’s Concresco, which won the First PhotoBook Prize. © David Galjaard.

Paris Photo and the Aperture Foundation announced the winners of the first annual Paris Photo Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards today.

The First PhotoBook Award went to Dutch photographer David Galjaard for his self-published book Concresco, about the remaining cold-war-era bunkers that dot the Albanian landscape. Open to all new bookmakers, the award includes a $10,000 prize.

An interior spread from Galjaard’s Concresco. © David Galjaard.

The PhotoBook of the Year award went to Anders Peterson for his City Diary (Volumes 1-3), which were designed by Greger Ulf Nilson and published by Steidl, and which depict the gritty sides of St. Petersburg, Stockholm and Tokyo.

The cover of Vol. 1 of Anders Petersen’s City Diary, which was named PhotoBook of the Year. © Anders Petersen, published by Steidl.

In the fall edition of Aperture’s Photobook Review, which announced the shortlisted books, the descriptions of the two eventual winners highlighted not only the content of the images, but the quality of the bookmaking.

Concresco is a consistently and elegantly rendered physical object,” the short review pointed out. “This three-volume set of soft-cover paperbacks with gatefold-like flaps is densely printed on every surface,” a review noted of Petersen’s City Diary. “The ink fumes that emanate from the rough-cardboard envelope that acts as packaging are fittingly as strong and musky as the photographs themselves.”

The envelope packaging of Petersen’s City Diary. © Anders Petersen, published by Steidl.

The prizes were awarded by a jury that included Roxana Marcoci, curator of photography at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Thomas Seelig, curator and curator of collections at the Fotomuseum Winterthur, Winterthur, Switzerland; Britt Salvesen, curator and head of the Wallis Annenberg Department of Photography and the department of prints and drawings at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Els Barents, director of the Huis Marseille Museum for Photography; and Timothy Prus, curator of AMC Books, selected the winners for both prizes.

All of the 30 books shortlisted for these prizes will be exhibited at Aperture in New York and will then tour to colleges, libraries and public exhibition space. To review the full shortlist visit The PhotoBook Review site here.