March 31st, 2016

New Lightroom Mode Turns Any Image into an Ansel Adams Masterpiece

Earlier this month, we shared a brief video homage to photography icon Ansel Adams. If you watched it, you learned how Adams spent years of time and effort learning how to make the image he saw in his mind appear before him in the darkroom.

That kind of work isn’t for everyone. For one thing, it involves hiking.

Fortunately, this being the 21st century, you don’t have to work hard to achieve Adams-level results. You just need to know what buttons to click.

In this edition of Lightroom Coffee Break, Adobe’s Benjamin Ward shows you just how easy it is to turn even the most mundane image into an Adams-esque masterpiece. It’s a must-see.

And yes, this is a day early.

March 16th, 2016

Ansel Adams, an Appreciation

We live in an era where photography is so pervasive and ephemeral that apps get multi-billion dollar valuations on the promise of deleting your images.

It’s a state of affairs that would no doubt flummox Ansel Adams, who saw in photography the possibility for “endless horizons of meaning” (today, it’s endless horizons of memes).

Readers are no doubt intimately familiar with Adams’ life and work, but we still found this short video appreciation of the master enjoyable. It details Adams’ growth as a photographer, his technique and his legacy in an era of image overload.

Enjoy.

Read More:
Explore the History of Photography in Kodak’s Vault

Hidden History of the Zoom Lens

A Brief History of Long-Lens Gotchas

 

April 10th, 2013

Spring Photography Auctions Total More Than $30.8 Million, Set Artist Records

© 2013 Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris. Man Ray's "Untitled Rayograph, 1922" set an auction record for a work by the artist of $1.2 million at the Christie's photographs sale on April 4.

© 2013 Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris. Man Ray’s “Untitled Rayograph, 1922” set an auction record for a work by the artist of $1.2 million during a Christie’s photographs sale on April 4.

Six photography sales last week at the three major auction houses in New York City brought in more than $30.8 million dollars and included record sales for masters Man Ray and Diane Arbus, among others, as well as contemporary artists including Robert Frank, Richard Misrach, Alex Prager and Viviane Sassen.

Two sales at Christie’s on April 4 and 5 totaled nearly 15 million. “The strength of these results is indicative of the thriving market for photographs, which continues to gain momentum with every sale,” said Philippe Garner, one of the Christie’s directors, in a statement.

The April 4 sale of a private collection of modernist photographs totaled more than $7.5 million, including a $1.2 million, auction record sale of a unique gelatin silver photogram by Man Ray, “Untitled Rayograph,” made in 1922. Nine other world auction records for artists were set during the sale, according to Christie’s. (more…)

December 2nd, 2010

Ansel Adams Onto The iPad With New App

Today publisher Little Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, announced the release of an Ansel Adams iPad app that brings together images, video, audio commentary, personal letters and postcards, and other biographical information on the pioneering photographer for the media tablet audience.

The app, Ansel Adams for the iPad, is the latest collaboration between Little, Brown and The Ansel Adams Trust, a publishing relationship Adams himself established in 1976. Andrea G. Stillman, who formerly worked with Adams and who is an expert on his work, selected the 40 photographs featured in the app, which span the full range of his career.

In a statement about the release of the app, Little, Brown claims the iPad’s “extraordinary luminosity” gives readers “a feeling and impact very similar to that of seeing an original Adams print in a museum.” Adams is famous for his meticulous printmaking, and his printed photographs are highly sought-after by collectors.

The app in on-sale for $13.99 via Apple’s iTunes digital marketplace.

Update on “Ansel Adams Lost Negatives” Court Case

Adams and The Ansel Adams Trust have been in the news recently due to the claim by Rick Norsignian to have discovered 65 “lost” Adams negatives at a garage sale. The Trust disputes that the negatives were created by Adams and is suing Norsignian and his partners, who they say have illegally offered prints and posters using Adams’ name and likeness. A recent motion by Norsignian and the defense to either move the case to another court or have it thrown out completely was denied by a California judge.

Related: Ansel Adams Trust Sues to Stop the Sale of Garage Sale Images