January 14th, 2014

Post-9/11 War Business Project Wins $20K Aftermath Project Grant for 2014

© Luca Locatelli

© Luca Locatelli

Italian photographer Luca Locatelli has won the $20,000 Aftermath Project Grant for his project “United Colours of War,” which looks at the increase in business connected to war following 9/11.

The Aftermath Project also recognized several finalists, whose work will be included in War is Only Half the Story, the annual Aftermath Project publication: Philippe Dudouit for his project on rebel movements in the Sahel region of Africa; Olga Ingurazova for her work on Abkhazia; Diana Markosian for her project on young Muslim girls raised in post-war Chechnya; and Javad M. Parsa for his work about Iranian refugees living around the world.

The Aftermath Project is a non-profit organization founded by photographer and filmmaker Sara Terry that supports documentary photography that tells post-conflict stories. The Foundation to Promote Open Society provides funding for the Aftermath Project Grant.

Judges for this year’s grant were: MaryAnne Golon, Director of Photography, The Washington Post; Elizabeth Krist, Senior Photo Editor, National Geographic; Muriel Hasbun, Professor and Chair of Photography, Corcoran College of Art+Design; Elizabeth Rappaport, photographer, board member The Aftermath Project; Sara Terry, photographer, founder and artistic director, The Aftermath Project.

Related: What It Takes To Win An Aftermath Project Grant
Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application

November 30th, 2011

$20,000 Aftermath Project Grant for 2012 Awarded to Andrew Lichtenstein

Photographer Andrew Lichtenstein has received a grant of $20,000 from The Aftermath Project, an organization that supports documentary photography that tells post-conflict stories.

Lichtenstein received the grant, which is supported by the Foundation to Promote Open Society, for his work “American Memory,” a series of landscape photographs at historical sites of conflict around the United States. “The judges found Lichtenstein’s project to be a highly original take on aftermath issues, and also found his images to be sophisticated and thought-provoking,” wrote Aftermath Project founder Sara Terry in a statement.

“Among the many photos in Lichtenstein’s work-in-progress that impressed the judges,” Terry added, “was a photo of three women in Confederate-era dress seated on a bench at the exact bus stop where Rosa Parks began her historic ride in 1955, launching the American civil rights movement (the women were participants at a recent Confederate Flag rally in honor of the 150th anniversary of the inauguration of Jefferson Davies, the Confederate leader).”

Judges for this year’s grant cycle, the organization’s sixth, included Terry, VII photo agency director Stephen Mayes, and Anne Wilkes Tucker, photography curator at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Lichtenstein was selected from a pool of 183 applicants from around the world, the organization said.

The organization also recognized four finalists, whose work will be included in the 2012 Aftermath Project book. The finalists are Christopher Capozzielo, whose project “For God, Race and Country” examines the Ku Klux Klan as it exists today; Michelle Frankfurter, whose “Destino” documents the effect Central American civil wars in the 1980s had on emigration to the United States; Simon Thorpe, whose “Toy Soldiers” is a creative documentation of Sahrawi soldiers who fought for their land in the Western Sahara; and Michael Zumstein, whose “Bon Amis” addresses Ivory Coast’s reconciliation following the contested 2010 election and resulting crisis.

Related: Eros Hoagland Wins $20k Grant for Conflict Photogs

Above: Photo © Andrew Lichtenstein. At the exact bus stop where Rosa Parks boarded her famous city bus trip to fight segregation in 1955, participants in a Sons of Confederate Veterans “Confederate Heritage Rally” wait to march up Dexter Avenue in downtown Montgomery to recreate the inauguration of Jefferson Davis 150 years later.

More Awards News

August 25th, 2011

Call for Applications: $20,000 Aftermath Project Grant

In 2012 The Aftermath Project will award a $20,000 grant to a photographer exploring the lasting effects of conflicts on civilian populations. The work of the grant winners and four finalists will be published in the sixth volume of War is Only Half the Story, the book published annually by The Aftermath Project. Applications for the 2012 grants are now being accepted (click here to download a PDF of the application). Applications must be received by November 1, 2011.

In the call for applications, Aftermath Project founder Sara Terry noted that in the project’s five years of existence, “almost all the proposals we have received (with a few exceptions) have been about the dangers of post-conflict situations, full of (warranted) concerns about often depressing conditions. Those are important projects, and I’m proud that we have recognized many of them. But as we enter our sixth year of granting, I would like to add another note to the conversation. For me, from the beginning, covering the aftermath of conflict has also always included an interest in better understanding the human spirit in conditions such as these – I remember being absolutely confounded by the Bosnian Muslims I met who were determined to go back to the homes from which Bosnian Serb neighbors had chased them away (and worse) during the war. I wanted to try to understand where that spirit comes from, how it survives, and perhaps why it offers hope that humanity can rise again despite the most hateful of conflicts.”

The Aftermath Project is funded by donations from institutions and individuals, and does not charge an application fee.

Related stories:
Davide Monteleone Wins 2011 Aftermath Grant

June 27th, 2011

Aftermath Project Launches $20k Grant for Conflict Photogs

The Aftermath Project, a non-profit organization that gives grants that help photographers tell stories about countries and communities affected by war and other armed conflict, has created a special, one-time $20,000 grant for conflict photographers.

The grant will be awarded to a photographer interested in telling a personal story of how their work covering war has affected their own life. The deadline for the grant is October 1, 2011.

“The subject can be approached in any way—portraits, landscapes, reportage, collaboration with a family of someone who has been killed, anything that explores the personal aftermath of covering war, whether that be PTSD, the aftermath of sexual assault, the aftermath of being wounded,” writes Aftermath Project director Sara Terry her announcement of the grant “This is a very open and fluid call for proposals on this subject, and we welcome any and all approaches.”

The grant was initiated by Terry in response to the “incredible sense of loss” in the photography community following the deaths of Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros in Libya earlier this year.

The Aftermath Project will also award a $5,000 honorarium to a fixer who has worked with a conflict photographer and wants to tell a written or visual story about how their work has affected their life.

Photographers and fixers who apply for the grant together are eligible for the full $25,000 award.

Download the grant application here:

http://www.theaftermathproject.org/pdf/conflictgrantapplication.pdf