May 15th, 2014

Sony Adds RX100 III, the Sequel to Our Favorite Pocket Camera of 2013

Sony just launched the pocket-friendly but powerful RX100 III, which is the follow-up to our favorite pocket camera of 2013. Those are some pretty big shoes to fill for a camera that’s just an 1.5-inch thick and weighs around 10 ounces.

Sony-RX100-III_Right-1200
The Sony RX100 III is not an overhaul of RX100 Il — thankfully, since that was a very well designed little camera — and even uses the same 20.1-megapixel 1.0-inch back-illuminated CMOS sensor as its predecessor. It also has about the same dimensions as the previous model — 4.0 x 2.3 x 1.5 inches — though might be slightly thicker.

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The new Sony RX100 III does, however, add some significant new features — particularly relating to the lens — including the following highlights:

Read the rest of this entry »

May 14th, 2014

Kidnapped, Beaten, and Shot in Syria, Photographer and Writer Manage to Escape

Photographer Jack Hill and reporter Anthony Lloyd of The Times of London escaped to Turkey after they were kidnapped, beaten and shot by a rebel gang in Syria, the newspaper has reported.

The two journalists had been in Aleppo accompanied by bodyguards, and were returning to Turkey when their car was forced off the road and they were taken hostage by about seven men.

Hill was forced into the trunk of a car, and “savagely beaten” when he tried to escape, The Times reported. Lloyd was held in the back seat of the car, and was shot twice in the leg during the ordeal.

The two journalists eventually fled to safety in Turkey, although details about how they escaped were not immediately available.

Related:
Spanish Journalists Freed After 194 Days in Captivity in Syria
Freelance Photographer Killed in Syria

May 13th, 2014

Big Guns: Nikon Launches 400mm F/2.8 FL ED VR Super Telephoto Lens and 1.4x Teleconverter

Nikon unleashed a new super telephoto lens and tele extender this morning: the AF-S Nikkor 400mm f/2.8E FL ED VR lens and 1.4x magnifying AF-S Teleconverter TC-14E III. Sports photographers and wildlife shooters should find a lot to like here; the Nikkor 400mm f/2.8 features improved autofocus, exposure accuracy and speed, while the teleconverter TC-14E III multiplies the focal length of Nikon lenses by 1.4x with reportedly only a one-stop loss of exposure.

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Unfortunately for those photographers looking to get their hands on these big guns they don’t go on sale until August 2014 and they won’t be cheap. The the AF-S Nikkor 400mm f/2.8E FL ED VR lens will sell for $12,000, while the AF-S Teleconverter TC-14E III will retail for $500.

Read more of this story here.

May 13th, 2014

Photojournalist Camille Lepage, 26, “Murdered” in Central African Republic

In her most recent post on Instagram on May 6, slain photojournalist Camille Lepage shared a photograph of people she was traveling with and details about her location.

In her most recent post on Instagram on May 6, slain photojournalist Camille Lepage shared a photograph of anti balaka [Christian militia] she was traveling with and details about her location.

Camille Lepage, a 26-year-old French photojournalist, has been killed in the Central African Republic, say reports from the Associated Press and Reuters.

According to the Reuters report, citing a statement released today by French President Francois Hollande, Lepage’s body was found when French-affiliated soldiers stopped “a car driven by anti-balaka [Christian militia] groups, in the Bouar region.”

The Associated Press report, citing Lepage’s colleagues, says the photojournalist was caught in fighting “while traveling in a village about 37 miles (60 kilometers) west of Bouar, near the country’s border with Cameroon.”

Lapage, who is from Angers, France, last posted on her social media accounts on May 6. In the caption to a photograph posted to her Instagram she wrote: “Travelling with the Anti Balaka to Amada Gaza, about 120km from Berberati, we left at 3.30am to avoid the Misca checkpoints and it took us 8 hours by motorbike as there is [sic] no proper roads to reach the village. In the region of Amada Gaza, 150 people were killed by the Seleka between March and now. Another attack took place on Sunday killing 6 people, the anti balaka Colonel Rock decides to send his elements there to patrol around and take people who fled to the bush back to their homes safely.”

In addition to covering Central African Republic, LePage had also photographed stories in South Sudan, and had been published in The New York Times, Le Monde, Der Spiegel, The Guardian and Le Monde among other publications. Lepage had also worked with Medecines Sans Frontiers, Amnesty International, the World Food Program, and other non-governmental organizations.

In their statement, the French President’s office called Lepage’s death a “murder,” saying, “Everything will be done to uncover the circumstances of this assassination and to track down who murdered our compatriot.”

May 13th, 2014

Collector Sues Chicago Gallery for Damaging 54 of His Vivian Maier Prints

A photo collector who bought part of the Vivian Maier photo trove when Maier’s storage locker was auctioned off in 2007 has sued a Chicago gallery, Corbett vs. Dempsey, for damaging 54 images during a 2012 exhibition of the work, according to a report today in the Chicago Reader.

Vivian Maier, who was unknown as a photographer when she died in 2009, has since been promoted to stardom by the PR machine of collectors John Maloof and Jeffrey Goldstein. They bought the lion’s share of Maier’s negatives and prints at the 2007 auction and are not involved in the claim against Corbett vs. Dempsey.

The collector suing the gallery is Ron Slattery, who bought several thousand of Maier’s negatives and several thousand prints when her storage locker was auctioned. According to the Chicago Reader report, Slattery provided 56 of the prints to Corbett vs. Dempsey for an exhibition and sale that ran from June through December, 2012.

Two of the prints sold. The gallery returned the other 54 prints in damaged condition, Slattery claims. He alleges that the gallery used too much hinge glue to mount the photographs, and it soaked through the print paper, “severely distorting the images.”

Slattery’s claim also that the damage was “exacerbated” by exposure of the prints to “excessive heat,” and he alleges the gallery tried to cover up the damage, according to the Chicago Reader report.

The gallery says it admitted the damage to Slattery upon return of the images, and claims have made “multiple” offers to settle the claim for $8,700–the cost of repairs estimated by a restorer consulted by the gallery.

Slattery is seeking $200,000 in actual damages to the photographs, plus $2 million in punitive damages.

May 12th, 2014

Richard Mosse Wins $50K Deutsche Borse Prize for The Enclave

Richard Mosse, "Safe From Harm," North Kivu, eastern Congo, 2012, © Richard Mosse, Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery.

Richard Mosse, “Safe From Harm,” North Kivu, eastern Congo, 2012, © Richard Mosse, Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery.

Richard Mosse has won the 2014 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize. The £30,000 award (about $50,000 US) is given annually to a photographer whose photo book or exhibition contributed to the medium of photography in Europe during the previous year. The news was announced this evening during a ceremony in London at The Photographers’ Gallery. Read the full story on PDNOnline.

May 7th, 2014

Photo Book Publisher Blurb Gobbles Up Its Biggest Competitor, HP’s MagCloud

The photo book self-publishing landscape has gotten a little bit smaller. Do-it-yourself book publisher Blurb announced yesterday it had purchased its biggest competitor: HP’s MagCloud web-based publishing platform.

BlurbMagCloud differs slightly form Blurb in that it is more of a soft-cover, magazine-style self-publishing platform than than a photo book publisher.

According to a press release from Blurb, MagCloud will become a part of Blurb under a new licensing agreement.

Current MagCloud customers will see no changes to their service for three months. Current and new photo magazine layouts will remain on MagCloud for photographers seeking to print, sell or distribute them. Once that period ends, Blurb expects to move MagCloud users to the Blurb platform.

“Indie magazines are experiencing a bit of a renaissance, and we’re thrilled to welcome MagCloud customers to the Blurb fold,” said Eileen Gittins, Blurb’s founder and CEO.

We’re wondering what readers feel about this news? I reviewed Blurb a few years ago and found it to be very easy to use and reasonably priced service that produced good if somewhat unspectacular results. I’m less familiar with HP’s MagCloud service and I’m wondering whether those users have any trepidations about this merger.

Please leave your thoughts on this self-publishing development in the comments below.

You can read more details about the MagCloud and Blurb merger here.

May 6th, 2014

New Free Web Service Claims to Offer Solution to Runaway Image Fakery

San Jose-based Fourandsix Technologies has announced plans to capitalize on “a growing distrust of manipulated images” with the launch of new forensic tool “to prove that hosted photos have not been modified with Photoshop or other tools,” according to a press release.

The tool is available for free to individual users at izitru.com. A developer API making it possible to integrate the photo authentication software into any website is available to third parties for a fee.

“Viewers are unsure of what to trust, whether they’re looking at a selfie on Facebook, an item for sale on eBay, or a dramatic storm cloud photo on Twitter,” the company says in its announcement.

The izitru.com website prompts users to upload their JPEG images, which are then subjected to six different forensic tests to distinguish original camera files from “subsequent derivations”–ie, files altered with Photoshop or other tools.  “Images that pass all six of these tests get the highest trust rating,” the company says in its announcement.

One of our first questions was, Can this tool be used to determine the authenticity of images already posted online–such as winners of major awards in photojournalism contests, or any other news images, for that matter? Read the rest of this entry »

May 6th, 2014

Good Food: Romas Foord, Ditte Isager, Food & Wine Honored in 2014 James Beard Foundation Awards

© Romas Foord. From Historic Heston.

© Romas Foord. From Historic Heston.

The James Beard Foundation announced the winners of its annual Books, Broadcast and Journalism awards on May 2, and two cookbooks shared the prize for best photography. Historic Heston, by chef Heston Blumenthal, features historic English recipes photographed by Romas Foord in the style of Old Master still-life paintings. Historic Heston also won the top award for Cookbook of the Year.

The other winner in the photography category is Rene Redzepi: A Work in Progress, which encompasses three volumes: a journal by the chef and author of Noma: Time and Place in Nordic Cuisine (published in 2010); a book of 100 recipes, photographed by Ditte Isager; and a collection of iPhone photos shot by the staff of the restaurant Noma.

Food & Wine magazine won the award for Visual Storytelling, which recognizes excellence in photography and graphic design.  The magazine’s winning submission included three stories published last year. The award was shared by Food & Wine‘s art directors James Maikowski and Patricia Sanchez, creative director Stephen Scoble, and director of photography Fredrika Stjarne.

The James Beard Foundation is a non-profit based in New York City that organizes lectures, workshops, events, and other educational initiatives around the country to promote the exploration of American culinary history and culture. All the James Beard Foundation honorees can be found at JamesBeard.org.

The year’s nominees can be found at www.jamesbeard.org/blog/complete-2014-jbf-award-nominees.

Related articles
Katie Quinn Davies and Gather Journal Win 2013 James Beard Awards for Food Photography

Ditte Isager: Traveling Light

May 2nd, 2014

Bon Appétit, W, National Geographic, Glamour Win National Magazine Awards for Visuals

bon appetit cover2Bon Appétit, National Geographic, W, and Glamour were the winners of the photography, multimedia and video category awards in the 2014 the National Magazine Awards competition, the American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME) has announced. The winners were honored at a ceremony last night in New York.

Bon Appétit won the Photography award for overall excellence in print magazine photography. The magazine also won the Style and Design award for fashion, decorating, design and travel coverage.  Alex Grossman and Alex Pollack serve as the magazine’s creative director and photo director, respectively.

W magazine won the Feature Photography award for a May 2013 feature titled “Stranger Than Paradise” with a series of fanciful photographs of Tilda Swinton by Tim Walker.

National Geographic won the Mulitmedia award for “The Last Chase” by Robert Draper, a story about storm chaser Tim Samaras’s death last May 31 in a tornado near El Reno, Oklahoma.

National Geographic also won the Tablet Magazine award for its August, October and November iPad editions.

Glamour won the Video award for three videos from its “Screw You Cancer” series: “Confronting Cancer: BRCA1 & BRCA2 Gene Mutations,”  “Recovery: Meds. And Love,” and “Life Post-Surgery: Back on Stage.” All were posted on Glamour.com last October.

According to ASME, which sponsors the awards, sixty-six magazines were honored as finalists in 24 categories, and 17 magazines won awards. Among the other winners were Fast Company, which won Magazine of the Year; New York magazine, which won the General Interest, Design, and Website awards; and TIME magazine, which won the Public Interest award. The Magazine Editors’ Hall of Fame Award went to Graydon Carter, the editor of Vanity Fair since 1992.

A complete list of winners and finalists is posted on the ASME website.