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November 4th, 2015

Microsoft’s Broken Promise


When we canvased some of the best hard drive and cloud solutions for archiving your images in June (subscriber link) we singled out Microsoft’s OneDrive for praise, noting that it was one of the best deals around. For the price of a Microsoft Office 365 subscription ($99/year), you could enjoy unlimited file storage on the OneDrive cloud.

Well, evidently the folks in Redmond have had a change of heart about that “unlimited” thing.

According to a company blog post, Microsoft is reneging on its offer of unlimited storage for Microsoft 365 subscribers because some users were storing a lot of files on OneDrive:

Since we started to roll out unlimited cloud storage to Office 365 consumer subscribers, a small number of users backed up numerous PCs and stored entire movie collections and DVR recordings. In some instances, this exceeded 75 TB per user or 14,000 times the average. Instead of focusing on extreme backup scenarios, we want to remain focused on delivering high-value productivity and collaboration experiences that benefit the majority of OneDrive users.

This serves as a useful reminder that not only is Microsoft  limiting your storage, they’re peering into the contents of your cloud drive, too. (They’ve made no secret that they do this.)

Microsoft is doing more than just capping storage limits for Office 365 subscribers, they’re also dramatically scaling back their free storage tier. Here’s what you can expect:

  • Starting now, Microsoft 365 subscriptions will include 1 TB of OneDrive storage.
  • 100 GB and 200 GB paid plans are going away as an option for new users and will be replaced with a 50 GB plan for $1.99 per month in early 2016.
  • Free OneDrive storage will decrease from 15 GB to 5 GB for all users, current and new. The 15 GB camera roll storage bonus will also be discontinued. These changes will start rolling out in early 2016.
  • If you are an Office 365 consumer subscriber and have stored in excess of 1 TB, you will be notified of this change and will be able to keep your increased storage for at least 12 months.
  • If you are using more than 5 GB of free storage, you will continue to have access to all files for at least 12 months after these changes go into effect in early 2016. In addition, you can redeem a free one-year Office 365 Personal subscription (credit card required), which includes 1 TB of OneDrive storage.
  • Current customers of standalone OneDrive storage plans (such as a 100 or 200 GB plans) are not affected by these changes.

While it’s certainly understandable from a financial aspect, any photographer or videographer who took Microsoft at their word is now faced with the unpleasant prospect of paying more than they anticipated or migrating their files to another cloud server.

This is also cautionary tale about the perils of cloud storage. Files stored on a third party’s servers are ultimately subject to that party’s terms of service and as Microsoft has just usefully demonstrated, those terms can change to your detriment. Cloud storage has many benefits and can be a useful option for your files. Until it isn’t. 

See Also:

How Apple Could Build the Greatest Cloud Service Ever

In the Digital Age, Longevity Is No Sure Thing

Burned by the Cloud? Try These High Capacity Hard Drives Instead


October 28th, 2015

Keeping Your Photo Business Profitable During the Holidays


Sponsored by Zenfolio

The holidays can be a stressful time when you may find yourself spending more money than you’re making. But if you’re a photographer, fear not! You can turn the holidays into a very profitable season. The experts at Zenfolio provide five easy ways to market your photography business during the holidays, because let’s face it: what says “personal” more than giving a photo gift to loved ones?


Here, Zenfolio provides five ways to advertise your site (and how to host a sale) during the busiest shopping season of the year:

  1. Offer Coupons and Gift Certificates

Everyone loves a good deal. Offer clients a coupon during the holiday season for an incentive to buy. Zenfolio offers three types of coupons: amount-based, percentage-based and base cost. Amount-based coupons subtract the discount amount from the order total, percentage coupons subtract discounts as a percentage of order total (sales tax excluded) and, lastly, base-cost coupons allow customers to order products at their base cost, bypassing any markup you may have added. You also have the option with Zenfolio to create a huge batch of coupons all at once.

Gift certificates are foolproof: they allow the gift recipient to pick exactly what they want for the holidays. Zenfolio offers gift certificates that act as a credit where the photographer creates the code to share with clients, and can be a form of payment during checkout to make the process simpler.

  1. Banner Advertisement

What’s better than advertising your sale front and center on your homepage? Zenfolio allows users to display banners in several different ways: photo, video, slideshow or a horizontal photo strip. It’s easy to display a sale you’re having, and you can even link it directly to the products offered for sale.


  1. Expiring Galleries

A different approach to getting customers to act is to set a deadline on their galleries. This means you can put an expiration date on when their photos will be available for viewing online. This will give them a gentle nudge to buy before their photos disappear. Zenfolio gives the option to set expiration dates on galleries, and after that date it is only seen as private. A notification email is sent to clients to remind them of this date.

  1. Visitor Sign-In

A great way to build clients is to have a visitor sign-in page, so you can market to your visitors later. Think of it as a modern day guest book for your website. With Zenfolio, you can apply a sign-in page to a group or gallery to gather information from those interested in your photography. This will be a helpful list to have on hand when you have sales so you can share the sale details to your entire list.


  1. Email Campaigns

Once you have that list of followers (even if it’s a small group, at first), Zenfolio allows you to send emails to your entire list, or to a selected tagged group of contacts. You can send out promotional emails for your sale with coupon code information inside, and push it with an expiration date (for example: two-day sale!). If it’s a previous client, it may be wise to direct them to a specific gallery. For example, you can entice them to buy framed prints from an old portrait that they can give to a loved one.

For more detailed information about how to advertise during the holidays, watch this free Zenfolio webinar. Get started on your own website with the two-week free trial today.

October 6th, 2015

500px Redesign: New Profile Pages, Discovery Features


500px pulled back the curtain on a major redesign of its profile pages, photo pages and the search experience.

A user profile page (pictured above) will no longer display square cropped thumbnails. Instead, thumbnails will retain their original aspect ratio. Profile images have been moved to the middle to make them more prominent, as has bio text.

The company also made the Follow and Share buttons more prominent.


Photo pages will now display larger photos. According to 500px, portraits will be 12 percent larger while landscape images will be 15 percent larger than before. A modal design displays images as pop-ups so that visitors can keep their place in the background. Information about the photo has been consolidated into a sidebar. All of the details, except for comments, can be collapses into a Details tab. If you frequently collapse the Details tab, 500px will remember your selection and begin to automatically collapse the tab for you.

Below an image, 500px will display the set it was a part of to help visitors find additional images. They’ve also improved how quickly images load by allowing a low-resolution version of the image to pre-load to enable those with slower connections to view something while the full resolution images finishes its journey from cyberspace to browser.

Finally, the Discover section of 500px has a new design that features full aspect ratio images that load smoothly as you scroll. Pages will scroll continuously now, too with no more pagination. The Fresh page will continue to support bulk uploads, but will only display the first three images in any bulk upload to preserve existing images on the fresh page.



September 3rd, 2015

The Future of Storage: Portable, Durable Solid-State Drives

Sponsored by SanDisk


Photographer Cliff Mautner shoots over 50 weddings per year. It’s high-stress, demanding work that means he’s always on the run. One weekend, he’s hopping a plane to San Francisco to shoot a wedding in a Federal-Bank-turned-wedding-hall. The next weekend, he’s photographing a couple in front of a New York sunset on a TriBeCa rooftop. Everywhere he goes, he brings his SanDisk Extreme 500 Portable SSD, which he says is “perfect for the wedding photographer.”

Indian Weddings at The Palace at Somerset Park

Mautner photographed a multi-day wedding in Sommerset Park, New Jersey, backing up the images from each day to the SanDisk Extreme Portable 500 SSD. / © Cliff Mautner

“When I shoot weddings, I need a portable, durable, fast drive that I can trust,” Mautner says. “The Extreme 500 is as light as a feather and fits into my front pocket. I can bring it anywhere.”

The Extreme 500 has completely changed Mautner’s workflow. It’s size, speed, portability and storage capacity (ranging from 120GB to 480GB) means that he can edit his images whether he’s shooting an Indian Sangeet ceremony in Philadelphia, driving to upstate New York’s beautiful Hudson Valley or flying to Northern California. When he returns to his studio, he can easily hand off the Extreme 500 to his studio manager for processing.


SanDisk Extreme 500

The Extreme 500 is a solid-state drive and connects to your computer via super-fast USB 3.0, making it four times faster than traditional external hard drives. Between the drive’s lack of moving parts and its rugged shock and vibration-resistant exterior, it is exponentially more reliable too. That means that when Mautner does want to outsource processing for a special event, he can ship the Extreme 500 without any fear that it will break under the rigors of shipping. It’s built to take a beating.

The SanDisk Extreme 500 makes it easy for Mautner to do his job without having to worry about failed hard drives or slow transfer speeds. When you are running at his speed, that makes a huge difference.


As the CEO of Stargate Studios, a state-of-the-art visual effects production house, Sam Nicholson is something like the conductor of an orchestra. On any given day, he’s managing ten different cameras from RED Epics down to GoPros, as they capture terabytes of footage from hit TV shows like The Walking Dead and Revenge. The footage is then transferred, copied, chopped up and shipped out to Nicholson and to offices in places like Berlin, Dubai and Malta where production staff create breathtaking visual effects.


Stargate Studios produced visual effects for the Globo telenovela, Os Dez Mandamentos (The Ten Commandments), in Brazil. / © Stargate Studios

To move that mass of data around, Nicholson relies on the SanDisk Extreme 900 to make sure that the footage gets to its destination quickly and reliably.

“The SanDisk Extreme Portable SSD is the future. There’s no doubt about it,” Nicholson says. “It’s incredibly reliable and fast, which saves you time and money.”

Today, Stargate’s workflow consists of a combination of solid-state cards in his cameras, a footage trailer on set outfitted with 30 terabytes of slower spinning hard drives and SanDisk Extreme 900 drives for transferring between editorial staff, Nicholson and Stargate’s multiple production facilities. Nicholson is itching to “future-proof” his production pipeline by using the Extreme 900 throughout because of their speed, size of up to 1.9TBs and durability. He likened his current situation to a six-lane freeway that unexpectedly closes down to a two-lane highway when data reaches the spinning drives.

“Until we use solid-state drives like the Extreme 900 through the entire pipeline, it’s like a traffic jam of data,” Nicholson explains.


SanDisk Extreme 900

In addition to the speed advantages, the Extreme 900 adds a layer of reliability that traditional spinning drives can’t match. In Stargate’s current workflow, Nicholson and his team have to back up all footage multiple times to protect from failing spinning hard drives—which he estimates occur 30 percent of the time. When he uses the Extreme 900, he doesn’t even bother backing up because he knows the drives won’t fail.

“Future-proofing” Stargate’s workflow doesn’t just save Nicholson time, it saves his entire staff time. That means less time transferring, copying and backing up data and more time doing what he and his team loves—crafting compelling stories and mind-blowing visual effects.

“No one pays attention to all the time that gets wasted managing your data,” Nicholson says. “When you realize how much time you can save, you understand why drives like the Extreme 900 are so important.”

June 24th, 2015

Uber for Drones: Fly4Me Connects Pilots with Clients

A photo posted by ( on

For all the popularity of drones, they’re far from a mass market product. Many users, even many photographers, may be leery of sending a flying robot into the air, lest it wind up on the White House lawn or on someone’s face.

That’s where Fly4Me comes in. It’s a new service that promises to link trained drone operators with paying clients–kind of like Uber for drones.

Drone owners use Fly4Me to create personalized profiles and bid on drone-related job offers, including aerial mapping, disaster surveillance but also photography and videography. Operators bring their own drone and get to keep 80 percent of any money earned. Any drone owner that wants to create a profile on Fly4Me has to undergo a safety certification process by the company first.

Fly4Me’s co-founder Adam Kersnoski told PDN that the company had obtained its 333 exemption from the FAA allowing commercial drone operations and that drone pilots using the service would be covered under that exemption.

The current exemption restricts the service to only using drone operators that fly a DJI Phantom 2, however Kersnoski told us the company’s lawyers were “already in the process of modifying [the FAA exemption] to exclude this restriction and add additional platforms.”


Fly4Me is based in Boston and is signing up drone operators throughout the country.

The company is planning to offer some interesting technology to customers who hire operators through the platform, including the ability to view flight results uploaded by the pilot, live-streaming from a drone’s camera, private communication between pilot and customer during flight and the ability for customers to select flight locations by pointing a pin on Google Maps.

(Lead image from left to right: Adam Kersnowski, co-founder; David Amatuni, designer; Dmitry Sharshunskiy, co-founder; Karina Dodor, attorney.)

May 29th, 2015

Google Photos Puts Dropbox, Box on Notice with Unlimited Photo Storage, Pushes Deeper into VR

slide8a_framedGoogle is rapidly pushing cloud storage into commodity territory with a new Photos app that gives users unlimited photo storage for images with a resolution of 16-megapixels and under. The app was announced at Google’s I/O developer conference.

Photographers shooting images at higher resolutions can opt to have Google automatically resize their images to stay in the free tier or to use Google’s existing paid storage plans for their digital negatives. Google plans start at $2/month for 100GB and $10/month for 1TB.

Videos can also be stored on the photos app. The free tier supports video resolutions up to 1080p. Videos recorded at a higher resolution will either be down-converted by Google to stay in the free tier, or you can opt to store the original file in Google’s fee-based storage service.

The new Photos app is largely aimed at consumers who have photos dispersed chaotically among a growing number of devices. The app will automatically and, Google claims, intelligently, organize images based on their contents. It will also synchronize images across devices.

Several photo features from Google+, like automatic image enhancement and collage creation, are also available in Photos.

Google Photos is available now for iOS and Android devices. It’s also available through web browsers. For more insights into Google Photos, check out Steven Levy’s interview with Bradley Horowitz, Google’s head of Streams, Photos and Sharing.

Google is also pushing its Cardboard virtual reality solution to Apple devices. Cardboard is an inexpensive, open-source virtual reality headset (literally made from cardboard) that uses mobile phones as the display. It’s a lower-cost alternative to high-powered gaming headsets like the Oculus Rift and Google told I/O attendees that more than 1 million Cardboard headsets were currently in consumer’s hands (or is that heads?).

To achieve an immersive effect, videos need to be played in an specialized app. Besides bringing its Cardboard-ready apps to iOS, Google said that 360-degree YouTube videos would also be playable in Cardboard headsets.

To jumpstart 360-degree video creation, Google is partnering with GoPro on a 16-camera rig called the Jump (which is different than the virtual reality rig that GoPro revealed earlier this week). Using the rig and the Jump Assembler software, videographers will be able to capture and stitch together video that can be viewable in any Google Cardboard app, including YouTube. The Jump VR rig is due in the fall.

May 19th, 2015

A Website As a Calling Card: Robert Gallagher Dishes on His Online Tools

Sponsored by Clickbooq

Robert Gallagher’s photography career is dynamic: One day he’s shooting a travel feature in Bora Bora for The Guardian; another day it’s the cofounder and CEO of the dating app, Tinder, for the cover of Forbes. When we connect over the phone, he’s brimming with excitement over a shoot in Los Angeles with singer, songwriter and musician John Lydon, who is best known by his former stage name as the Sex Pistols’ front man, Johnny Rotten. The shoot was a treat for the photographer, who having grown up in England in the 1970s, notes that it was “Margaret Thatcher vs. the Sex Pistols” in the spectrum of cultural iconography. He had the opportunity to get to know the family-man side of the infamous English punk rock singer when he gave him a ride home from the shoot. “That’s why I love my job,” he says. “You never know who you’re going to meet from one day to the next—I love those little vignettes of life.” But what really struck him about Lydon was that he showed up to the set with only a simple plastic bag full of his belongings. “He still a little bit anti-establishment,” Gallagher laughs.

Screen Shot 2015-05-14 at 12.13.32 PM

John Lydon, aka Johnny Rotten, on / Photo by Robert Gallagher

Gallagher has a no-nonsense approach both in front of the camera and behind the scenes. In marketing his work, he believes his images should do the talking. That means he wants a website design “without all the unnecessary bells and whistles.” His site, he explains, is his “calling card” and a “marketing piece in itself,” so a clean design and a gallery that displays his images edge-to-edge is what gives the photographer’s work the most impact. “I have to get out of my own way and let the images do the selling for me,” he explains.


Billy Idol, photographed for Der Spiegel / Photo by Robert Gallagher

And sell his images do. Gallagher’s celebrity portraiture, travel editorial and personal surfing images have landed him jobs with top clients: from Vogue, Forbes and TIME to MTV, Apple and Nike. When the photographer isn’t on the road, he’s running the day-to-day aspects of his business. He doesn’t have a web designer, but having started his photography business before the digital era, he’s no stranger to adaptation. “I’ve had to learn how to think like a computer but I don’t want to spend all of my time learning a new program,” he explains.

Bora Bora with Andrew O'Hagan. Travel feature for The Guardian W

Bora Bora with Andrew O’Hagan. Travel feature for The Guardian / Photo by Robert Gallagher


Tinder cofounders Jonathan Badeen, Sean Rad and Justin Mateen. / Photo by Robert Gallagher

This is why he turned to Clickbooq when he wanted to build a website: The templates are user-friendly and intuitive so he doesn’t have to spend his time learning new technologies, and the new HTML5 sites are search engine optimized and fully responsive so he knows he’s on the cutting-edge of web design. Further, the highly-customizable Moderna template displays his portfolio in a grid-style that gives an overview of his work, but can also be expanded edge-to-edge, allowing portraits of icons like Lydon to shine. “I personally think [the grid] is what people look at—they want to see the general [portfolio] overview. I love how it repopulates based on the browser size,” he says. “It kicks butt.” He also notes his delight over the full-screen images that “show off” his web page. “I know it will have an impact.”

Screen Shot 2015-05-14 at 12.14.55 PM

“Tearsheets” thumbnail view on

Gallagher is also enthusiastic about the possibilities of integrating his more recent motion work into his website; he recently added a video page in just a few minutes, describing the “user-friendly” process of embedding “video playboxes” as “genius.” Over the phone he asks me to refresh my screen to see if I prefer his videos in a larger format. “I just made that change while we’ve been talking,” he laughs. But on a more serious note, he says, “Clickbooq is genuine about wanting to make their websites better for photographers.” And for a photographer who is as forthright as Gallagher, that makes all the difference.

Ready to launch a new website? Sign up for a free 14-day trial and take 15% off any new plan with promotion code, PDNNATIVE.

May 15th, 2015

An Apple Camera Makes No Sense, But This Does

iCloud_Photos_iPhone4s_iPad_MBP15inch_PRINT Over on LinkedIn, Sean White argues that with the Watch, Apple is now in the business of disaggregating pieces of the iPhone so it only makes sense for Apple to launch a standalone digital camera next.

“The watch is an obvious step for Apple because it’s a familiar device that benefits from ensemble integration…. An Apple Camera would benefit from the same integration and design,” White writes.

Color me skeptical. Wearable technology is a growing category, so Apple’s decision to dip its toe (or is that wrist?) into that market makes sense. The standalone digital cameras business, on the other hand, isn’t growing (you can thank the iPhone for that).

But that’s not to say there isn’t a significant photo-related opportunity for Apple to capitalize on, one that would speak to both the casual snap-shooter and the professional: iCloud.

Apple has taken a relatively cautious and slow-moving approach to the cloud. iCloud originally debuted as a means of syncing files between Apple devices and only recently evolved into a proper file storage system. Nonetheless, iCloud remains immature and costly relative to its competitors. But Apple has something many of its cloud competitors don’t have: profit. A lot of it.

Let’s back up.

In our piece surveying long-term storage options for photographers, one theme came up again and again: the cloud had a lot of promise as a long-term archive, but the costs and risks associated with a cloud provider going out of business makes many users reluctant to entrust their archives to the cloud.

While cloud storage is definitely here to stay, picking the right cloud provider is still an exercise in stock-picking. Dropbox and Box, for instance, are both flush with venture capital, but Box isn’t profitable and Dropbox’s financials are a mystery. Google is profitable, but a business model built on data-mining isn’t exactly a welcoming home for important creative assets.

Apple, on the other hand, has more cash lying around than some nation states. With that money they could not simply build a better cloud storage service, they could guarantee a long-lasting one. What if Apple used a portion of this towering mountain of cash to back a “lifetime guarantee” for iCloud–a kind of financial promissory note to reassure users that images stored in Apple’s servers will remain accessible for generations? You could argue that this guarantee is implicit in iCloud today given that Apple is so wildly profitable, but this promise could be made explicit and indeed, be the principle differentiator for Apple versus its other cloud rivals.

Just how they could structure and back such a promise is beyond the scope of this post, but it seems like a challenge worth tackling.

So a standalone Apple camera sounds like a dead-end. A lifetime or more of secure cloud storage, on the other hand, sounds like the future.


In the Digital Age, Longevity Is No Sure Thing

High Capacity Storage for Your Photo Archive

January 16th, 2015

Martyna Galla Makes Her Mark with a Online Portfolio

Sponsored by Format


At just 22 years old, fashion photographer Martyna Galla is a force to be reckoned with. She’s amassed a list of clients that includes Avon, Universal Music and Elle; success she credits to her insatiable enthusiasm for creating imagery. Raised in a small town near Warsaw, the burgeoning teen’s discovery of the medium began when she was given her first camera at 14. Galla began photographing her sister and “the prettiest girls at school,” and within just two years, landed her first paid job shooting model tests at Warsaw modeling agency D’vision Models.

The professional opportunity solidified Galla’s aspirations to build a career as a photographer and propelled her to enroll film school in Łódź, Poland, where she was further trained in photography.  Now out of school, constantly shooting tests, regularly investing in gear and studio space, and expanding her contacts to include a wider range of models, make-up artists and stylists have all contributed to her growth.

© Martyna Galla

Just as crucial to her development as a professional photographer, however, has been the ability to market her online portfolio. “People must see your work,” Galla says. “Potential clients, friends, agents, models—you never know who will like it and recommend your work.” But not all websites are created equal, as Galla has learned. Out of all the options available, Galla rates, a portfolio website platform for creative professionals, above the rest. “Format was not the first platform I used to share my photography, but it is the most professional. My work is available in high quality and is viewable on any browser or mobile device,” she says. “My portfolio is the one I continue to share with clients. Its professional design lets my work shine.”

© Martyna Galla

Format’s online portfolio website offer photographers all the advantages they desire when showcasing their work online. Its elegant, professionally-designed themes enable photographers to create a stunning presentation of their work in an instant—all without any knowledge of coding. Format’s websites are also fully customizable, including a custom domain: photographers can choose from a wide variety of specially-designed page templates or build their own from scratch using Format’s advanced code editor. In addition, Format’s websites are mobile- and tablet-ready, and include built-in, powerful, image-based blogging, seamless linking to social networks, unlimited bandwidth, automatic and fast image resizing, continual fast speed image loading, password-protected pages, search engine optimization, video capability, and 24/7 around-the-clock reliable service and support no matter the time zone.

Work as strong and as unique as Marytna Galla’s demands a presentation that only has been able to deliver—and quite effortlessly so. Interestingly, when asked to describe her photographic style, some of the words Galla uses are “easy,” “sensible,” and “calm,” adjectives that could also be used to describe the experience. “I like to keep things simple,” she continued. “When I find the person in front of my camera to be charismatic and interesting, I let them have the advantage while shooting. It always brings something new and unexpected.”

Visit and create your very own online portfolio.

See a short video on Galla and her work below.


December 19th, 2014

Creative Cloud Photography Plan–3 Myths Debunked

Sponsored by Adobe

Screen Shot 2014-12-19 at 12.37.18 PM
Photos © David Guenther

When the subscription model was first announced for the Adobe Creative Cloud in 2011, many photographers were concerned about the implications of “renting” software. Adobe, recognizing that most photographers don’t need the entire suite of applications they offer, responded with a special version this summer that includes Photoshop CC and Lightroom–the two tools most important to a photographer’s digital workflow, and widely considered the standard for post-production.

David Guenther (, a respected wedding and portrait photographer based in Lethbridge, Alberta, uses Lightroom and Photoshop CC extensively– they are, as he puts it, his “jam”. Guenther does his photo processing in Lightroom before sending them over to Photoshop CC for final tuning and output. In his opinion, the subscription model of $9.99 per month is a great value. “I’d rather pay a low monthly cost than buy the software outright at a huge price, and then have to upgrade every time a new version comes out,” he explains.

While the cost efficiency is a plus, the subscription-only model has been a big change for photographers who were used to a one-time purchase and basic access from their personal computers. Three years after Adobe Creative Cloud’s first release, we still hear common misconceptions about its features and functionality. With the release of the Creative Cloud Photography plan, it’s time to clear the air.

David Guenther Adobe CC

The Myth: The Creative Cloud Photography plan is more expensive in the long run.

The Truth: When compared to the traditional model of purchasing and upgrading, the Creative Cloud Photography subscription saves hundreds of dollars and spreads out the costs over time. When you add in the mobile applications that can handle powerful photography editing (photo editing in Lightroom mobile, for example) and other services like Lightroom web for sharing and receiving feedback, the value of Creative Cloud becomes very clear. And, as an added bonus, photographers of all levels will find value in Adobe’s extensive video tutorials that are available with the plan.

The Myth: All of your images will be stored in the Cloud.

The Truth: It’s not necessary to store your images in the Cloud (nor will you lose them if you have a lapse in your subscription), and all of your files can easily be stored locally. The Cloud is a just a very cool bonus–for many photographers, like Guenther, access to mobile apps like Lightroom mobile and Photoshop Mix let him edit and organize his photos while away from the computer. He says, “I use the Adobe Creative Cloud quite a bit. It’s important for me to have access to images and shoots I’m working on, because I’m often collaborating on a project and need to discuss work when I’m away from my computer. In that way, it’s been a huge help. I always have access to my work. All that, combined with Smart Previews in Lightroom, means I can work pretty much anywhere at any time. That’s essential for me.”


The Myth: All Creative Cloud applications are Cloud-based.

The Truth: One of the biggest misconceptions about Creative Cloud subscriptions is that you need to be connected to the Internet in order to use the applications. All of the desktop applications live on your computer. There is no requirement to have a full-time Internet connection­–Creative Cloud checks once a month to validate the subscription, taking only a few seconds. And with the mobile applications, this means you can work anywhere: remote locations, at the client’s office, or wherever you travel to.

Guenther says, “For me, Creative Cloud Photography has allowed me to be more mobile and work while I travel or while I’m away from the office. The Adobe tools I use operate just the same, but I have more flexibility.”

You can read more about the Adobe Creative Cloud Photography plan at And, as always, you can download a free 30-day trial of Lightroom or Photoshop CC–desktop or mobile–to try it out for yourself.