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May 21st, 2013

The Highs and Lows of Photographing an Italian Cycling Competition

© Manual For Speed

© Manual For Speed

Manual for Speed (MFS), a website covering professional cycling created by writer/photographer Daniel Wakefield Pasley and photographer Emiliano Granado, is currently featuring daily reports from the Giro d’Italia, a cycling race through Italy that dips into neighboring European countries.

Granado and Pasley created MFS in 2011 with sponsorship from Castelli, a cycling apparel company. Pasley’s reporting on the Giro d’Italia has included access to two cycling teams that Castelli sponsors: Garmin-Sharp and Team Colombia, the Colombian national team.

MFS’s coverage of the Giro d’Italia is unique not only for the quality of photography—action, landscapes, crowd portraits, and a typology of cycling team buses, among other goodies—but also for its diaristic tone. Pasley’s account of the highs and lows of photographing a month-long sporting event is honest and highly entertaining.

If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to persevere through maddening daily logistical challenges, to “lite-stalk” professional athletes, to be heckled by spectators, to drop one’s expensive camera in a puddle, or to see Italian children cursing in English at a race helicopter, the daily reports by Pasley are worth a read.

Or you can just look at the pictures.

September 14th, 2012

PDN Video Pick: Chasing The Light (With the New Nikon D600)

Wildlife photographer Florian Schulz, who we profiled in the August 2012 issue of PDN, was asked by Nikon to put the recently released D600 through its paces. Schulz was the first photographer to test the camera in the field. He and his brother, filmmaker Salomon Schulz, produced this short film, titled “Chasing the Light.”

NIKON – CHASING THE LIGHT from Florian Schulz on Vimeo.

Related: Photokina 2012: Nikon Debuts Smaller, 24.3MP Full-Frame D600 DSLR for Photo Enthusiasts

December 20th, 2011

Dragonfly Photo Wins $10k National Geographic Photo Contest

© Shikhei Goh

A close-up photograph of a dragonfly weathering a rain storm in Indonesia’s Riau Islands earned photographer Shikhei Goh the $10,000 grand prize in the 2011 National Geographic Photography Contest.

In a statement, National Geographic magazine photographer Tim Laman, who was one of three judges for the competition, celebrated the photograph’s “beautiful light, rare action in a close-up image, as well as its technical perfection.” Goh’s photograph also won first prize in the “Nature” category.

A photograph by Izabelle Nordfjell of a Sami reindeer hunter preparing to take a shot while his son covers his ears won first prize in the “People” category, while George Tapan’s image of
a rainbow stretching out over the ocean off of the Philippines’ Onuk Island received first prize in the “Places” category.

These photographs were selected from more than 20,000 images submitted by professional and amateur photographers from more than 130 countries.

Galleries of the winning images and honorable mentions are online here.

The other judges were National Geographic magazine photographers Amy Toensing, and Peter Essick.

August 31st, 2011

PDN Video Pick: On Assignment with Jimmy Chin in Yosemite

Adventure photographer Jimmy Chin recently shot a feature story for National Geographic about the derring-do of modern day rock climbing, and Renan Ozturk of camp4collective.com made this behind-the-scenes video of Chin at work. It’s full of spectacular views, sweaty palm moments, and insight about how Chin works while dangling from a climbing rope on El Capitan and other Yosemite cliffs.

August 1st, 2011

PDN Video Pick: KI: Michael Levin, by Brad Kremer

Fine-art photographer Michael Levin says he first came across filmmaker Brad Kremer’s video work in late 2010 and was immediately engaged. “His video “Hayaku” is like a poem told through time-lapse photography. I felt moved along by the kinetic energy in the piece and he had me hooked,” says Levin, who needed some video footage shot in Japan for a separate project. He contacted Kremer with a basic pitch. The resulting video shown here reveals Levin’s personal experience of witnessing Japan as he worked in different locations. “I wanted to show the process, the journey, the adventure in a way that would give the viewer an emotional connection to Michael and his photography,” Kremer explains.

February 1st, 2011

PDN Video Pick: Winter In Hell

Winter in Hell from Enrique Pacheco on Vimeo.

Enrique Pacheco’s short film “Winter In Hell” (not a reference to the regular severe weather warnings afflicting areas of the United States this season), was created from footage shot in Iceland over the course of a year. It tells the story of a peaceful arctic winter interrupted by the explosion of the Eyjafjallajokull volcano.

The photographer and filmmaker used the Canon 7D and 5D Mark II, and Canon and Carl Zeiss lenses to shoot the footage. We recommend utilizing the full screen mode.

January 25th, 2011

PDN Video Pick: It’s Better In The Wind, by Scott Toepfer

Photographer Scott Toepfer‘s 2011 Trailer 2 video hypes his photo project and upcoming short film called, “It’s Better In The Wind,” which was shot on location throughout the western U.S. (The project re-imagines the long distance motorcycle treks of the 1960s/1970s.) Trailer 1, launched ten months ago, was a teaser for Toepfer’s photo book and exhibit that debuted in L.A. this past August. The stills for both were shot using 35mm film, and Toepfer solicited funds and support for the book on Kickstarter. The video trailers are comprised of Canon 5D Mark II footage, and the 15 minute short film due out this summer is a mix of Super 8 and Canon 5D Mark II footage. (Toepfer says that by using a combination of video teaser/slideshows, Web 2.0 social marketing, blogger/Web interviews/features, he’s managed to increase his Web site traffic by 500 percent.)

August 3rd, 2010

Steve McCurry Marks End of Kodachrome Era with Global Trip

Last summer when Kodak announced it was discontinuing its once popular Kodachrome film, Steve McCurry requested the last 36-frame roll manufactured by the company.

For nine months he planned a nostalgic journey to places he shot in the past. Followed closely by a National Geographic Channel TV crew, McCurry ventured this past June on a six-week global trip that brought him from Brooklyn to southern Asia, Italy and Turkey, and finally to Parsons, Kansas, where Dwayne’s Photo, the only Kodachrome-friendly film processing facility left in the world, processed McCurry’s roll.

Those who still have unused and/or unprocessed Kodachrome should take note: Dwayne’s will quit processing the film at the end of this year.

National Geographic Channel is planning on broadcasting a documentary about McCurry’s journey sometime in 2011

—Cameron Handley

Related: Kodachrome Culture of PDN Photo Of The Day

Via: http://www.dailynews.com/ci_15660092

May 18th, 2010

Eyjafjallajökull Timelapse Video Shot With 5D Mark II


Flush with cash from recent jobs and looking at ten days off in late April/early May, photographer and filmmaker Sean Stiegemeierdecided to head to Iceland to create a stop-motion video of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano as “a fun thing to show my friends,” he says.

“I’m somewhat weird like that. When I see something I want to do, I typically just go do it and worry about it later,” Steigemeier toldPDN via email. “It drives my girlfriend crazy.”

Using Canon’s 5D Mark II and 2.8 L series Zoom lenses, and a motorized timelapse dolly prototype loaned to him by MiLapse, Stiegemeier made use of the day-and-a-half window of decent weather he got while on location to create the above video, shot from pulled-back vantage points around the base of the volcano.
 
The trip took Stiegemeier from Seattle to Detroit (where he picked up the dolly and got a tutorial on how to use it on the floor of the airport), back to Seattle (flight to Reykjavik canceled), then to New York, Glasgow, the wrong part of Iceland and then, a six-hour bus ride later, to Reykjavik. 

After waiting out four days of bad weather, Stiegemeier got a window of decent conditions right before he was about to leave Iceland, during which time he shot the roughly 7000 stills that went into creating his video.  

Stiegemeier, who says he is “a firm believer in using technology to color correct and create the best looking images,” used HDR (high dynamic range) processing for some of the shots. He says it took four days for his computer to render the video, but he didn’t spend very much time choosing images, color correcting or editing because he didn’t expect many people to see it.

The video, posted to Vimeo seven days ago, has generated 600 comments and nearly 10,000 “likes” from viewers.