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February 3rd, 2011

Thomas Hoeffgen Photographs Thierry Henry & the NY Red Bulls 2011 (Video)

Last year, we shared some behind-the-scenes video of photographer Thomas Hoeffgen capturing Rafa Marquez of the New York Red Bulls soccer club as part of our How I Got that Shot feature.

Well, a new season of MLS soccer is almost here and Hoeffgen and his Hasselblad were back in the studio recently to shoot a whole herd of Red Bulls including French superstar Thierry Henry.

Check out the video of the 2011 shoot below. Get Microsoft Silverlight

January 24th, 2011

Green Bay Packers QB Aaron Rodgers Breaks Scott Kelby’s Monopod

©Scott Kelby

“Hey Aaron Rodgers, you owe me $250!” That’s what Photoshop guru and photographer Scott Kelby was saying — with tongue planted firmly in cheek — after the Green Bay Packers quarterback crashed into Kelby on the sidelines of Sunday’s NFC Championship game and broke his Gitzo monopod.

And then I see it—-the bottom half of my monopod is gone!! Ripped off at the stem. So I’m right in front of Rodgers, and I yell, “Hey…..Rodgers….you broke my monopod!” And he looks at me, and I guess he sees my Bears earmuffs, and says “Too bad, Bears fan!” And I said “Hey, you’re buying me a new Monopod!” And he looks at me says, “Yeah, right.” and I’m all “Yeah, we’ll just see pretty boy.” (from Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider.)

While the incident with Rodgers did happen — the Packers QB was sprinting for the end zone in the first quarter when he slid into Kelby on the sidelines — the above conversation is, of course, fictitious. Though’s Kelby’s monopod snapped in half, his more expensive gear — Nikkor 400mm f/2.8, 24-70mm f/2.8, and Nikon D3 — got muddied but survived.

Read more about Kelby’s scrape with the Super Bowl-bound QB here.

©Scott Kelby

January 21st, 2011

PDN Video Pick: Night Surfing a Gargantuan Wave

As Jeff Spicoli of Fast Times at Ridgemont High might say: “Awesome! Totally awesome!”

That’s the reaction we had when we saw this short video clip of big wave surfer Mark Visser dropping in on a massive 15-foot swell in near total darkness in Maui last night. Visser had specially designed LED lights built into his surfboard and life vest and was towed into the wave by a jet ski. Other than that though, he was on his own in the dark while facing treacherous surf that’s known locally as “Jaws.” (Yikes!)

The stunt was part of a documentary series Visser is working on called “9 Lives.” Luckily he didn’t lose one of those lives during this spine-tingling night ride. (More details at Transworld Surf.)

January 3rd, 2011

Photographers Discuss Best Sports Photos of 2010

©Mail on Sunday/ZUMApress

In mid-December we postulated that this Morry Gash AP photo of Lebron James unleashing a tomahawk jam while Dwayne Wade soars underneath like an airplane might be the best sports photo of 2010.

Now, The Wall Street Journal is weighing in with its list of the five top sports images of 2010 and along with including Gash’s photo it includes commentary from the photographers on the stories behind the shots.

According to photographer Mark Pain, who captured the comical shot of Tiger Woods driving the ball right into his lens, the Cigar Guy in the image who become an Internet cult figure, was nearly edited out of the picture.

“The ball came straight toward me, hit the camera in the lens, bounced onto my chest and landed between my feet,” said Mark Pain, a Mail on Sunday photographer. “One of the loveliest things about the photo is the expression of the spectators. It’s, like, ‘Wow, that guy’s gonna get hit!’” As for Cigar Guy? He was almost cropped out. “He very nearly didn’t get his moment of fame,” he said.

December 16th, 2010

Lebron Dunks; Wade Soars…Sports Photo of the Year?

©Morry Gash, AP

Some are calling it the sports photo of the year and it was captured, like many great images, partially by chance.

AP photographer Morry Gash’s photo of Lebron James dunking while his partner in crime on the Miami Heat, Dwayne Wade, soars underneath like a pterodactyl, was shot early on during a December 6th match-up against the Milwaukee Bucks. The Heat would go on to win 88-78 in an otherwise uneventful game.

Even when you look at the video of the dunk, shown below, it seems like a rather nonchalant, if commanding, sequence by the Heat. Gash’s image though shows the swagger and the domination of two of the Heat’s controversial superstars.

So how’d Gash get the wide-angle shot? Well, he was actually just focusing his Canon 1D Mark IV on Lebron at the time.

(more…)

November 11th, 2010

Photographer’s $11K Nikon Rig Trashed in Drag Race Mishap (VIDEO)

This’ll bring a tear to the eye of any photographer. Mark J. Rebilas recently lost his Nikon D700, 400mm f/2.8 lens, and Pocket Wizard set-up to an out-of-control dragster speeding along at 250 miles an hour.

Luckily for Rebilas, the camera rig was set up remotely so he was nowhere near it when the race car went sideways.

Unluckily for him, $11,000 worth of gear was scattered in pieces all over the track.

(Via PetaPixel from f stoppers.)

August 26th, 2010

Canon Lens Mug Guy Gets a Nikon DSLR Birthday Cake

To paraphrase George Costanza, worlds have collided!

Nikon-cake Microsoftie Josh Weisberg, the guy we wrote about earlier this year who rose to fame when he secured a coveted Canon lens mug at the Vancouver Olympics (sorry, that original post was destroyed when our blog went down), recently celebrated his 40th birthday with, get this, a birthday cake in the shape of a giant Nikon digital SLR.

Josh’s friend Mia made it for him, basing it on an old D200 he loaned her. (Ok, so maybe he’s not a Canon guy, after all.)

Josh reports that the entire cake is edible, including the printed labels which are made of edible ink; the plastic on the LCD panels; the lens; and the back cover which are made of sugar.

Happy birthday Josh! And maybe for your next one Mia can make a cake shaped like a Canon lens mug. Talk about worlds colliding.

Nikon-bday-cake-2

August 16th, 2010

Leica Limited Edition X1 “Le Mans” Camera? We’ll Pass

We're a fan of the classic 24 Hours of Le Mans car race and classic Leica cameras, so add the two together and you should have a winner, right? Um…no.

Leica-X1-lemans Leica's special limited edition Le Mans version of its X1 digital camera — reviewed here last February — is underwhelming to say the least. Basically it's a Leica X1 with what looks like a sticker placed on top.

The Le Mans X1 was released back in June to commemorate the race and has a limited edition run of 50.

Not clear if all 50 have sold out yet but it's still up for sale at the Leica Store Paris.

On the bright side, the mark-up for the Le Mans version of the X1 is pretty slight. It's selling for 1590 Euros which converts to about $2035. So, in other words, that Le Mans sticker adds about $35 to the list price. Oh, there's also a version sold with a leather case for 1690 Euros or approximately $2163.

We say skip it and save up your pennies for something more extravagant like this gold-plated Leica MP.

(Via Leica Rumors.)

Leica-x1-limited-edition-le-mans 

Leica-X1-case

July 20th, 2010

Photographer Cut by Getty for Altered Golf Photo Offers Explanation

Golfer-before The freelance photographer we told you about yesterday who was dropped by Getty after one of his images of a golf tournament was found to have been digitally altered has offered an explanation of what happened.

Marc Feldman, whose freelance status with Getty was terminated over the altered photo, told the Dallas Morning News he made "a fatal mistake."

"There was absolutely no intent to pass this off as a real image," Feldman explained to Dallas Morning News photo editor Guy Reynolds for the paper's Photography Blog. "Only a moron would have sent both."

A photo Feldman captured of golfer Matt Bettencort was distributed by
Getty Images even though a caddie had been digitally removed from the
background. Getty, which has a strict policy against altering its news
images, later put out a "mandatory kill" notice on the photo after Reynolds alerted them to it, and dropped
Feldman from its roster.

Feldman, 61, told Reynolds that he was in the press tent processing the images when Bettencort and his caddie stopped by to look at the photos. The caddie then suggested the photo would look better without him in it.

Matt Bettencourt 2 copy-thumb-300x190-86601 "So I showed them how easy I could do that," Feldman told Reynolds. "I thought I just saved it to the desktop not to the send folder. I certainly did not mean to send both of them to Getty."

What do you think about Feldman's explanation? Does it sound like a plausible, honest mistake? Have you ever done anything similar? Please leave your thoughts in the comments below.

July 19th, 2010

Getty Photographer Dropped Over Altered Golf Photo

Photo-kill Getty Images has severed ties with a freelance photographer after an image he captured of a golf tournament was determined to have been altered with software.

The photographer, Marc Feldman, was cut by Getty after the manipulated image was discovered by a photo editor at the Dallas Morning News.

"Getty Images actively advocates and upholds strict guidelines pertaining to the capture and dissemination of its editorial content," Getty's public relations manager Jodi Einhorn wrote PDN in an email.

Golfer-before "As such, when Getty Images was made aware of (the) altered image in our coverage of this event, it was immediately removed…from our website and a mandatory 'kill' request was sent to our feed-based subscribers. In adherence with our zero tolerance policy on photo manipulation, we terminated our relationship with freelance photographer Marc Feldman."

The story broke when photo editor Guy Reynolds of the Dallas Morning News stumbled on the altered image while perusing photos of the Reno-Tahoe golf tournament. Reynolds found two Getty images of golfer Matt Bettencourt, one showing him with a caddy behind him, the other with just trees.

At first Reynolds thought the images were shot by two different photographers from slightly different angles but, as it turns out, both were credited to Marc Feldman, a Getty freelancer.

After inspecting the images more closely, Reynolds discovered they were the same shot but "one had been doctored with software to remove the other man."

Reynolds contacted Getty's picture desk in New York about the images and a "Mandatory Kill" advisory (to the right, above) was sent out shortly thereafter.

(Via Dallas Morning News' Photography Blog.)