You are currently browsing the archives for the PhotoPlus Expo 2012 category.

October 31st, 2012

PPE 2012: What Photo Editors Want

At the PhotoPlus panel “Your Picture Here: How to Get Published in The New York Times, Time, GQ and Wired” photo editors from all four publications spoke candidly about what photographers can do to get their attention. There were, of course, things specific to each publication. Carrie Levy of Wired, for example, noted that it’s difficult for her to hire photographers who shoot exclusively in natural light because the magazine has a look that demands poppy and highly produced images. Meanwhile, Krista Prestek said GQ likes photographers who have a fine-art sensibility and a strong body of work that demonstrates their ability to successfully fulfill assignments.

But on a number of topics, they all seemed to agree. One was promos. Almost all of the panelists preferred printed promos to mass e-mails or cold calling. Paul Moakley of Time compared the promo process to courting: Only after a few introductory mailers is it OK to call or e-mail him to request a meeting. Prestek noted that since her first priority is the magazine, hard copy promos are better because they let her see what the work looks like on the printed page. She also suggested photographers pick an image that is in line with the magazine to use on their promo. Levy doesn’t mind e-mails, but noted a few things photographers shouldn’t do: send e-mails first thing in the morning (when she has the most e-mails in her inbox); compose mass e-mails instead of personalized ones; and embed images in the body of the e-mails because they don’t show up. Finally, The New York Times Magazine’s Clinton Cargill noted that sometimes years go by between the first time he first sees a photographer’s work and when he gives the photographer an assignment, so it’s always good to keep the photo editor up to date via mail or e-mail in terms of what you’ve been working on.

Personal work was also something that the photo editors like to see. All four pretty much agreed that a personal project is more interesting to look at and speaks to the photographer’s originality and personality better than assignment work. But when you do include assignment work in your portfolio, Prestek and Levy preferred seeing the actual image to the tearsheet. Other portfolio tips: Moakley noted that the images in your portfolio should relate to the magazine; Levy said some people aren’t interested in seeing the work on an iPad or laptop, so be sure to bring prints as well (preferably a box of prints rather than in a portfolio case); Prestek said a portfolio should demonstrate that your images will look good in print; and Cargill added that if you’re doing the work you want to be doing, then that’s the work that should be in your portfolio.

During the seminar, all four panelists answered questions from audience members. The following were mentioned as places where they found new photographers: The Wall Street Journal, Connections by Le Book, galleries, Paris Photo, The New York Times, The New Yorker, self-published books, agency e-mails, competition annuals, through colleagues and other photo editors, portfolio reviews, drop-offs, Eddie Adams Workshop, Review Santa Fe, Les Rencontres d’Arles, PhotoNOLA, Aperture, Photolucida’s Critical Mass, Foam magazine and W. Eugene Smith Awards.

Their parting advice: Apply for everything.

October 30th, 2012

PPE 2012: 8 Dos and Don’ts for Crowd-Funding Campaigns

It seems like nowadays every photographer is launching a crowd-funding campaign to raise money for a book or to shoot personal work. But how many of those photographers are actually meeting or surpassing their fundraising goals? At the PhotoPlus seminar “Crowd-Funding Your Photography Project,” five panelists shared their thoughts on how to raise money using two crowd-funding platforms, Kickstarter and Emphas.is.

Gerd Ludwig moderated the panel. He used Kickstarter in 2011 to raise funds for his long-term series on Chernobyl, because traditional media outlets weren’t interested in commissioning the work. Ludwig raised over $23,000, which he used to travel to Chernobyl, and publish a book and iPad app of the work.

The panelists were Karim Ben Khelifa, co-founder of Emphas.is; Aaron Huey, a photojournalist who used Emphas.is to raise over $26,000 for a billboard and information campaign surrounding his work on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation; Justin Jensen, a photographer who used Kickstarter to raise over $485,000 for his product CineSkates, which are wheels that snap onto the bottom of a Gorilla tripod; and Jon Pack, who used Kickstarter to raise over $65,000 for his photography project “The Olympic City” and the resulting book. Below, some campaign dos and don’ts they learned along the way.

1. Do make a video for your Kickstarter or Emphas.is page, which tells visitors about the project. Ludwig noted that a video provides an opportunity to address your audience personally as well as to give your credentials and background so people feel comfortable investing in your work. Huey added that the video is essentially the elevator pitch for your project, so it’s important to make it as professional as possible. Meanwhile, Ben Khelifa advised photographers to avoid the words “help” and “support” in their videos since Emphas.is sees the relationship as more of an exchange between the photographer and his or her audience.

2. Do create a reward structure that awards every donor regardless of the amount of money they give. Huey said some of his rewards had a dollar value that was worth more than the donation amount, which was a good incentive for people to give. Ludwig noted that he had a reward for every size pocketbook.

3. Don’t only think of rewards that cost money. Ben Khelifa said some of the most successful rewards offered on Emphas.is only cost the photographer time, such as one-on-one photography workshops or portfolio reviews. Ludwig added that every person who donated to his campaign was included on a donors’ list, which is posted at the exhibitions of the work.

4. Do collaborate with the people who donate to your project. Park and his partner, filmmaker Gary Hustwit, agreed to let backers vote on one of the former Olympic hosting cities that would be included in their project. He also noted that when he and Hustwit were traveling to the various cities, backers would sometimes e-mail them with recommendations about where to shoot. Jensen had some backers help with the testing of the initial CineSkates product. He also made additional product lines based on suggestions given by backers.

5. Don’t forget to communicate with backers during and after the campaign. Emphas.is was started because Ben Khelifa believes that people are interested in the experiences of photographers and photojournalists, which is why the “Making of Zone” is such a crucial part of the site. Pack said many people were into “collaborating” on his project, so he would answer e-mails throughout the campaign and then launched a website afterward so donors could stay up to date on the status of the project. He also posts updates on his Facebook page and e-mails backers regularly.

6. Do try to get funds from people outside of your personal and/or professional networks. Huey said he didn’t even ask for money from his personal networks. Instead, he appealed to the street art world, since Shepard Fairey created some of the posters, and to Native American rights groups, because his work focused on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. By identifying influential bloggers in both worlds, he was able to spread the word about his campaign to people who are passionate about these two things. Ludwig noted that you get your backers’ e-mail addresses to contact them about future campaigns, but Ben Khelifa added that this only works if you’re good at communicating during the first campaign (see above).

7. Don’t underestimate shipping costs. One of Ludwig’s rewards was a copy of his book Broken Empire: After the Fall of the USSR. Over 25 percent of the donations at this $100 reward level were from overseas, and it cost him $31 (not including packaging) to ship each book internationally. Jensen also made this mistake, by offering all backers in the U.S. free shipping once the product came out; international backers were charged an extra $20 for shipping. The problem was that shipping overseas ended up costing more than $20 and many backers in the U.S. wanted their products shipped overnight.

8. Don’t assume that all you have to do is launch the campaign and you’re done. All the panelists agreed that crowd funding is very time consuming. Huey even went so far as to say he couldn’t do another crowd-funding campaign anytime soon because the billboard campaign took over his life for two months and he just doesn’t have that kind of time right now. Ludwig noted that his studio manager was a crucial part of his campaign, while Jensen said he ended up hiring a staff of five to help once it looked like they were going to get enough money through Kickstarter to fully launch the product.

Related Articles:

Helping Communities Speak for Themselves: Aaron Huey’s Pine Ridge Community Storytelling Project
Crowd-Funding Success Story: Gerd Ludwig
Object of Desire: CineSkates

October 30th, 2012

PPE 2012: Ed Kashi and Julie Winokur on Cross-Platform Storytelling

For the PhotoPlus seminar “How to Evolve Projects Across Media Platforms,” partners and spouses Ed Kashi and Julie Winokur took the audience through some of the multimedia projects they’ve worked on together. Kashi, a photojournalist with VII, and Winokur, a writer and filmmaker, first collaborated on magazine articles. But as they noted numerous times throughout the discussion, it’s important to think about all of the different outlets where you can show your work, and focusing just on print is not sustainable because commissions from magazines are dwindling. They added that being a single skillset photographer is an idea that is starting to fade away.

Winokur began the seminar by taking us through “Bring It To The Table,” her current project. This personal documentary video follows Winokur around the country as she asks people to literally “sit at her table” to discuss politics. She started the project by raising $30,000 on Kickstarter, which Winokur said helped build an audience of about 280 people who are now invested in its success. She has since recorded a number of conversations between herself and different people on the political spectrum. She is now at the point where she’s trying to find distribution for the Web-based series. Social media has played a crucial role in getting the word out: Winokur has been posting short clips of footage on Facebook and Twitter in order to draw people back to the site bringit2thetable.org. Her strategy is to repurpose the material and post it where people are already interacting with content. The challenges remaining are figuring how to get people to see the series and how to monetize it. Winokur noted that “Bring It To The Table” has received a lot of “earned media” with many publications writing about the project itself, but no media outlets have been willing to show the final Web series in its entirety.

So how did Winokur evolve from a print journalist to a filmmaker? We discovered the answer when she and Kashi took us through their first multimedia project, “Aging in America.” The series, which they began around 17 years ago, was initially conceived as a book and exhibition. They financed the first four years of the project themselves, and later got assignments and commissions for the work; they also licensed some of the images and received grants. About halfway through the seven-year project, they met Brian Storm, who was then working at MSNBC. He offered to do a multimedia piece about the series, which consisted of stills and audio. This sparked the idea of recording Winokur’s interviews with their subjects on video. This resulted in over 100 hours of footage, which also included some b-roll. They turned all of the material into a one-hour documentary, which aired on PBS and is still used at universities across the country as a teaching tool in programs like nursing, medicine and psychology.

The Sandwich Generation,” which focused on Winokur’s father, who was suffering from dementia, was a natural next step for the duo. They partnered with Storm again, who by this time had formed MediaStorm. It would be the first time that Kashi and Winokur turned the camera on themselves as they documented caring for the elderly man. It was also the first time Kashi would shoot still and moving imagery with a cross-platform project in mind. The final result was a multimedia work consisting of still photos, video and audio.

Other projects discussed during the seminar were “Curse of the Black Gold,” a stills and audio project about oil in the Niger Delta; “India’s Fast Lane to the Future,” a stills, video and audio project done as a five-part series while on assignment for National Geographic; “The Leaves Keep Falling,” a project about the effects of Agent Orange in Vietnam that consists of stills, video and audio, and was done on commission for an NGO; and “Three” and “Photojournalisms,” which are multimedia extensions for two books that Kashi published.

Some of the tips given by Kashi and Winokur about multimedia work were:

• Always think about the end goal when shooting stills and moving imagery for multimedia work. They recommend being aware of the narrative you’re trying to tell when capturing both.
• As print resources continue to shrink, consider partnering with NGOs and other organizations as a way to disseminate work you are passionate about.
• Consider how publications want to extend printed articles via their websites and tablet editions when pitching ideas.
• Conduct your audio interviews first in order to get to know your subjects and establish the narrative that the multimedia component will follow. It’s also the fastest way to get educated about the topic.
• Don’t try to shoot all of the video and still imagery yourself. Kashi noted, for example, that on the National Geographic assignment he focused on the still images while his fixer recorded the video footage.

Related Article:

Ed Kashi and Julie Winokur on the Work-Home Balance

October 29th, 2012

PPE 2012: Facing The Lack of Diversity in Photography and The Arts

To provide some context for the PhotoPlus Expo panel discussion on “(Mis)representation: The Underrepresentation of Non-Whites and Women in the Arts,” moderator Charles Guice, an independent photo dealer, noted some statistics about the changing demographics of the United States. According to recent census data, whites in the US will no longer make up the majority of the country within a few years. Yet, he noted, whites still make up 91 percent of all museum goers, and white artists are represented in 91 percent of all museum and gallery exhibitions. “If the arts are to remain relevant who’s responsible for changing the status quo?” he asked. Guice asked his panel to look both at how women and artists of color are underrepresented in the arts, and what needs to change. His panelists were Manjari Sharma, a photographer born and raised in Mumbai and now based in Brooklyn; John Edwin Mason, a writer on photography and associate chair of history at the University of Virginia; Rocio Aranda-Alvarado, curator at El Museo del Barrio in New York; and Miriam Romais, executive director of En Foco, a non-profit devoted to supporting US-based photographers of Latino, African, Asian and Native-American descent and the editor of Nueva Luz, the photographic journal produced by En Foco.

Guice quoted the oft-cited statistic used by the feminist arts group Guerilla Grrls in its slogans: Less than 3 percent of the artists represented in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art are women, but women represent 83 percent of the nudes. Women also make up a tiny percentage of any “power list” of influential curators or gallerists. Sharma noted that the struggle for equality “begins at an early age”; she cited studies showing that girls talk less in class, get less attention from teachers, and tend to undervalue their performance.“The female gaze isn’t given the same attention,” she noted, and later added, “Women don’t recognize their own voices.” Aranda-Alvarado observed that throughout history, “The Academy was the training ground for male artists,” and tended to set the standard by which later art was judged. Sharma noted that the problem is compounded by the dominance of white males among the decision-makers and gatekeepers. “We need more diversity among the jurying panels.”

Mason offered two anecdotes about occasions when pointing out the blinkered view of certain jurors and gatekeepers helped raise awareness about the lack of diversity among the photographers they promoted. When a group of photo bloggers recently teamed up to name photographers who are moving the medium forward Mason noted on Twitter that the absence of photographers of color on the list was “stunning.” Mason said at least two of the contributing bloggers (all of whom were white and “overwhelmingly male”) responded with embarrassment and regret. “I think they were being honest … that we work with these kind of blinkers,” he said.

“The problem with lists is that whoever is compiling them should say, ‘This is according to me.’ No one can know everything. You can work real hard, but if you’re in New York or London or Charlottesville, Virginia, most of the names on the list are going to be American or European because that’s what we know.” He added that today, bloggers have gained the kind of authority and influence that mainstream media and arts institutions once had and, like magazine editors, they “have to learn to look inclusively.”

Mason noted that the Look3 Festival of the Photograph, which has taken place annually in Mason’s hometown of Charlottesville, was similarly limited in its choices of speakers and workshop leaders. However, once the festival grew from a private event in photographer Nick Nichols’ backyard to a large event that receives public funding from the city of Charlottesville, many people on the faculty of the University of Virginia and in the city wanted it to expand its list of featured speakers to a more inclusive list of photographers. The organizers responded, and its speakers in the last two years have included LaToya Ruby Frazier, Hank Willis Thomas and Stanley Greene. Mason said, “I think that the people at Look3 sincerely see that leaving out three-quarters of the world, or 30 percent of the American population, is a bad thing. They understood the rightness of what we were saying.”

He noted that such openness does more than bring additional perspectives to the festival’s educational programs. “We’re talking about photographers’ lives and careers here,” he said. “Sometimes if you’re not inviting them [photographers of color] then they’re not getting that networking opportunity and meeting those people and getting those mentors.”

Mentors, Romais said, are essential to help photographers build networks and contacts. En Foco offers many portfolio reviews and juried shows devised to give more photographers exposure, but she also noted that she has sometimes found it “heartbreaking” to see talented photographers who lack training in presentation, editing or preparing for portfolio reviews. Mentors, she said, can help new photographers understand the importance of being able “to talk eloquently about their work and without self consciousness,” and to present their work confidently to jurors and reviewers “without compromising their own vision.” Sharma, who said she was fortunate to have “strong female instructors” when she was a student, asked, “Should we feel an obligation to lift up other females?”

At this point, an African-American photographer in the audience said that he’d heard discussions like this, “identifying the problem” for years, but has heard few solutions. He noted that, as a member of ASMP, he is typically the only African-American at meetings, but he added, “I keep showing up,” in hopes that he’ll encourage other photographers to follow. Audience member Shawn Walker, a member of Kamoinge, the photographic collective, has supported African-American photographers since its founding in 1963.

In a discussion of the pros and cons of culturally specific institutions, Aranda-Alvarado said she worries whether, after photographers “make the rounds” of artists-in-residency programs aoffered by the Studio Museum of Harlem, the Bronx Museum of Arts and other organizations devoted to supporting photographers of color, they are also given opportunities to be seen by curators at larger institutions. “Not often,” she said. When El Museo holds its biennial, they invite curators from the Whitney Museum of Art and other large museums to view the featured work. Romais noted that En Foco changes the jury for its contests and portfolio reviews each year in order to help photographers get wide exposure. En Foco’s printed showcase of photographers, Nueva Luz, is also distributed for free to thousands of editors and curators.

The questions and comments from audience members made it clear that there are numerous barriers for photographers of color to be recognized by arts institutions as well as gatekeepers in media. An Arizona-based photographer and professor who is Native-American said, “The people who buy photography and the people who hire photographers for magazines—I could never reach them. I had to do powwows and Monument Valley.” An African-American woman who credits her uncle, a photographer, with mentoring her early in her career, said she tries to make her own opportunities. “I don’t wait for anyone to open the door for me because I open the door.”

Guice noted that photographers like Roy deCarava who questioned the status quo were sometimes labeled “difficult” or “trouble makers.” Mason said that during the push to diversify Look3, “I didn’t expect the young photographers to speak up.” The fight, he said, was largely lead by academics with tenured positions. However, he said, “There’s an issue of personal responsibility. If you reach a position where you have the juice, you have to use it.”

Near the end of the panel, Guice asked the panelists again: Who is responsible for challenging the status quo?” Romais replied, “Everyone in this room.”

Note:

Audience members were provided with a hand out of articles referenced by panelists, and a lit of the following organizations providing education and outreach in support of diversity:

http://www.elmuseo.org

http://www.enfoco.org

http://womenintheartsfoundation.org/index.cfm/fa/c.about

http://www.nmwa.org

October 29th, 2012

PPE 2012: James Balog on Using Art to Alter Perception About the Environment

As the Northeast braces for Hurricane Sandy to make landfall this evening, with schools and offices—including PDN‘s—closed in preparation, it seems an appropriate time to recap photographer James Balog‘s keynote address this past Saturday at Photo Plus Conference + Expo. Balog’s talk covered his Extreme Ice Survey (EIS) project, which shows through time-lapse video the recession of 27 glaciers around the northern hemisphere, from Greenland to Iceland to Alaska to Montana and Nepal. The time-lapses are remarkable: viewers the recent spike in the earth’s temperature manifested in the shrinking of massive glaciers over the course of just a few years. Balog also introduced and screened a documentary about the EIS project, called “Chasing Ice” (see the trailer here).

Balog has dedicated his life and career to photographing the environment and nature, and his talk was more focused on how humans are changing the planet than on photography. But it did present the photographers in the audience with some insights into how photographic tools can be used to change public opinion and into how one photographer is accomplishing that task.

“Art in combination with science has proven to be effective” in shifting the public understanding, Balog noted in explaining his methods and thinking. “We are visual witnesses. [Cameras] are not just tools, they are vital parts of the sensory apparatus of the human race.” Indeed the EIS time lapses, enabled by digital camera technology, have allowed Balog and his team to show us something we could never have otherwise seen.

Balog was a budding scientist when he decided he was more interested in photography than in statistics and crunching numbers, he recalled. As a young adult he “realized that one of the pivotal issues of our era is the intersection of humans and nature,” and his work has focused on “probing that boundary,” he explained.

The EIS project grew from assignments from National Geographic and the New Yorker to photograph glaciers. Through those assignments Balog discovered a way to visualize the idea that humans “are changing the basic operating system of the earth” by burning hydrocarbons, and that that reality could be understood through looking at the planet’s ice. Glaciers serve as barometers and thermometers for the planet, Balog noted, and “everyone knows what happens when ice melts.”

When he launched the EIS project five years ago, Balog and his team created digital camera systems with custom-made timers and solar panels that would capture an image of a glacier every 1/2 hour during daylight hours. Those systems were mounted in modified Pelican cases and trekked into remote areas around the planet to record the changes to some of the most massive glaciers in the world. The results of the project address the “need to introduce more understanding of the truth” of how humans are changing the basic functioning of the earth.

During his talk Balog noted that “Chasing Ice” has been sent several times to President Obama, and to every member of Congress. The film will open in 24 theaters nationwide in November, expanding to more theaters if the public response is positive. Balog also said the EIS group is engaging with the Evangelical Creation Care movement to spread the word about the project and film among that group, which is dedicated to preserving the environment. A book of Balog’s glacier photographs, Ice: Portraits of Vanishing Glaciers, was also released last month from Rizzoli.

Balog envisions the EIS project going on indefinitely, he noted. He also spoke about a new non-profit organization he is establishing called Earth Vision Trust, which will look to fund other people’s environmental projects through fellowships.

October 29th, 2012

PPE 2012: On Making Compelling Portraits

In the seminar “The Art and Business of Portraiture,” held during PhotoPlus Expo, portrait photographers Lydia Panas, Chris Buck, and Charlotte Dumas showed their work, primarily focusing on their fine art images, and described how they interact with their subjects to make compelling portraits. Gallerist Michael Foley of the Foley Gallery in New York moderated the discussion.

Panas, a fine artist whose portraits reveal much about character and relationships, showed work from her Mark of Abel and Falling from Grace projects. She explained that she doesn’t direct her subjects; in fact, she talks very little, and works without assistants when she’s shooting fine-art portraits. “I recognize what is happening between myself and the model, and I don’t force anything,” she said. “It’s amazing what you can see just by staring at someone.” (more…)

October 26th, 2012

PPE 2012: David LaChapelle Gets Personal

David LaChapelle began making photographs in the early Eighties in New York City while around him friends were dying of AIDS. His early black and white photos, shot by window light and manipulated in the darkroom through bleaching, burning or collaging, explored “metaphysical themes” of mortality and transcendence through religious imagery – winged figures, crosses and bodies bathed in a celestial light. After a hugely successful career as a commercial photographer, video director and documentary filmmaker, LaChapelle has recently returned to “metaphysical themes that still interest me.” In his keynote at PhotoPlus Expo, he showed the work he’s recently shown in galleries and museums:  images using religious iconography, images of transcendence, and vintage work that was rarely seen. Since 2005, he has not shot a fashion assignment. “I didn’t burn out, as some people have written. I walked away.”

While showing the audience an early photo he made as a memorial to a friend who died of AIDS at the age of 24, LaChapelle explained, “I didn’t think I’d be around very long. I wanted to give the world something of beauty.”

(more…)

October 26th, 2012

PhotoPlus Expo 2012: Canon EOS Remote App Wirelessly Connects 6D DSLR to Smartphones

The full-frame 20.2-megapixel Canon EOS 6D digital SLR won’t go on sale until November but we got a look at a very handy new free app that will let you connect the camera wirelessly to smartphones.

Canon’s Chuck Westfall demoed the app for us, which is called Canon EOS Remote, at PhotoPlus Expo this week. At the time of this writing, Canon EOS Remote was only available for Android smartphones but an iOS version for iPhones was on its way. (There was no word on whether an iPad or Android tablet version of the app was in the pipeline too but it seems likely.)

With the Canon 6D’s built-in WiFi turned on, the app lets you review images wirelessly from the DSLR’s SD memory card on your smartphone, rate them and even delete them right from your phone. You can also zap images from the 6D and save them on your Android or iOS smartphone at a reduced size.

(more…)

October 26th, 2012

PhotoPlus Expo 2012: CineMoco Motorized Camera Dolly Gives You Hands-Free Movement Shots for Video and Time-Lapse Photography

Fresh off the success of his popular CineSkates HD-DSLR dolly system from last year, inventor Justin Jensen of Cinetics was at PhotoPlus Expo this week showing off his latest product: CineMoco, which is a compact, motorized dolly and slider for shooting video and time-lapse photography.

Think of it as CineSkates with a brain.

Like CineSkates, CineMoco started as a Kickstarter project and easily blew past its pledge goal. The Kickstarter goal for CineMoco was $50,000 but, at the time of this writing (with just eight hours left in the Kickstarter campaign), the product had received nearly $103,000 in pledges.

While the appeal of CineSkates was it simplicity (three skate-like wheels that attach to a tripod to turn it into a dolly), the modular CineMoco system is a much more sophisticated product.

(more…)

October 26th, 2012

PhotoPlus Expo 2012: Kodak Professional Film App Connects Photographers to Pro Film Resources

Here’s an interesting new app for your iPhone launched at PhotoPlus Expo by none other than Kodak. Called the Kodak Professional Film app and available now for free from the iTunes store, the app helps photographers locate where they can buy their favorite (remaining) Kodak films and where they can get them developed.

The app also offers tips on how best to shoot certain types of Kodak films. Some of the film stocks supported by the Kodak app include BW400CN, Ektar 100, Portra 160, T-Max 400, Tri-X 400 and others.

Sadly for film (and film grain) lovers, one of the films not included in the app is Kodak T-Max P3200, which was discontinued by the company earlier this month.

News of the new app also comes on the heels of a Kodak announcement in August that the company plans to sell off its film and photo paper business in an effort to pull itself out of bankruptcy.

Despite the tough times for Kodak’s film business, the company attempted to put a positive spin on the app and on Kodak pro film at the PhotoPlus show.

“We wanted to give photographers of all levels a resource, literally right at their fingertips, that helps them find film and recommendations about how to maximize each film’s performance,” Dennis Olbrich, Eastman Kodak’s general manager of Film, Paper & Output Systems said in a statement.

“In addition, this app also provides information where customers can find film development services, so that no matter where photographers are, they can find a lab that uses Kodak Chemicals and Paper to bring their photography to life.”

(more…)